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I have read a couple obscure threads on other forums where the cooks were talking about how when using a Kamodo grill, cooking a full packer brisket at 300F yields a better product for some reason, and also gets done slightly quicker. Is this true? And, if so, how long would one expect to cook a full pack 14lbs brisket at 300F?

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I cook mine at 275° all the time, and I've seen others do 300° with great results. You don't want a rub with any sugar, and at 300° or better, wrapping may be beneficial. Your cook time will decrease dramatically, as there won't be much of, if any stall. I don't like to guess times, but some insist on it, so I'll say roughly 30 mins/lb. 

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OK, so may a good guess for 275-300F may be about 8 hrs then?

 

That would seem about right to me. Besides, if I wrap and let it stand in an insulated bag/cooler for a good 3hrs, that should stabilize and finish any last render it needs, I would think.

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2 hours ago, Condor1970 said:

OK, so may a good guess for 275-300F may be about 8 hrs then?

 

That would seem about right to me. Besides, if I wrap and let it stand in an insulated bag/cooler for a good 3hrs, that should stabilize and finish any last render it needs, I would think.

Every brisket is going to take different amount of time.  They can vary drastically.

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I'm a 275 kinda guy. Just make sure you use temp probes or you can torch brisket real quick. Agree with the no sugar rubs at that temperature and for wrapping at 160.

 

I'm same temp with ribs and my 3-2-1 is more of 1-1-1 for baby backs and 1-1.5-1 for spares, maybe longer. 

 

Practice and figure what works best for you. All Q is good Q. 

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Oh trust me on this. When it comes to times, I'm well aware each cut of meat can vary greatly. However, I guess I just need to get the best "Guestimate" I can, since we are having friends over today, and I am hoping to have a decent piece of meat done by about 5-6pm. I got it on the grill at 5:30am, and still was a bit low around 225F. I got it up to 250F at 6am and slowly to 270 in the next few mins.

 I will be probing it in about 4hrs, and watching to see when hits 160F, then wrap with foil. I think I have enough time to keep it down around 270-275F and still have plenty of rest time before we eat tonight.

 Anyway, just to let you know, I gave it a nice moderate Jack Daniels beef rub. I really like that particular rub for some reason. Pretty cheap and common at Wally World here.

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I've done quite a few at 300+ it works great.

There's some pretty famous pitmasters who only cook hot and fast, they mop with sauce quite a bit to keep the juices in FWIW.

IMHO if you plan on serving on time, you better foil it and turn it up.

Remember, it needs to rest at least an hour before slicing.

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13 hours ago, 5698k said:

I cook mine at 275° all the time, and I've seen others do 300° with great results. You don't want a rub with any sugar, and at 300° or better, wrapping may be beneficial. Your cook time will decrease dramatically, as there won't be much of, if any stall. I don't like to guess times, but some insist on it, so I'll say roughly 30 mins/lb. 

 

Yes, I don't do over-night cooks.  Brisket turns out great @ 275F & nobody be the wiser!  I use simple dry rub & never wrap, though I do monitor it closely near the end of cook, as it can get over-cooked easier than one would think.  Not true over-cook, but the bark can get rather burnt, so you need to get it off the cooker as soon as it probes tender.

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Well, I actually wrapped at the stall around 162F, but wasn't too happy with the bark. It had a light mahogany, but not dark yet. I like it a little darker. So, I decided to open the foil back up to absorb a bit more smoke and bark up a little more til 175F.

 

One thing irked me a bit. I pulled it at 162F to wrap, and while I was taking it out, the coals took off on me, and when I put it back in, it shot up to 320F. It wouldn't even come down with dampers closed. I have a small side pan of water in there, but it wasn't helping. So, I dumped a cup of water directly onto the drip pan underneath, and shut the lid. It immediately boiled off, and the steam knocked down the coals enough to get things under control within just a few minutes. Amazing how steam can put out a fire. LOL

 

As of right now, I just closed the foiled back up at 175F, and the grill is at a steady 275F. I think I may start probing and checking tenderness at about 192-194F.

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