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moloch16

First Cook: Tandoori Chicken

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After several glitches with Wal-Mart shipping of my new Akorn, I finally broke it in on some tandoori chicken.  Was going to do ribs but we harvested a ton of tomatoes from the garden and need to do something with them and my first choice is one of my all time favorite dishes - butter chicken.  If you aren't familiar with butter chicken its chicken cooked tandoori style coated with an indian tomato sauce (gravy).  So we had tandoori chicken for dinner and then later this week we'll make butter chicken with the rest.  YES!

 

One of the main reasons I went with the Akorn is I can cook low and slow or high and fast.  Tandoori ovens are traditionally crazy hot (900+ degrees) but I can't get that hot!  I pre-heated the Akorn up to 450 and threw the chicken on.  Had the vents closed to maintain the 450 temp but lesson learned - once the chicken is on just open the vents all the way and crank it up good and hot as the temps dropped down to 300 once the chicken was on.  I opened the vents all the way about 15 minutes into the cook should have done that from the beginning to get some better caramelization on the chicken. Turned out yummy can't wait for the butter chicken.

 

 

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Looks and sounds good.  Did you let the Akorn stabilize at the 450 for a little while before putting the chicken on?   Once stabilized you shouldn't have to fiddle with your vents too much if at all.

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Yes it was at 450 for about ten minutes, I think the combo of opening the lid and throwing a bunch of cold chicken on the grill took the temp down.  It would have climbed back up just not as fast I as I wanted.

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Looks great! I've never done Tandoori chicken and didn't know it was cooked at such a high temp. I wouldn't recommend 900+ temps on the Akorn but you can safely run it at 700 if that would help with the Tandoori. You'll need to reseason your cast iron after the cook though.

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Walk us through the process.   Did a little research and found the yogurt protects the skinless chicken so the internals can get up to temp.  Also, need to flatten the chicken as much as possible and cut slit in it lengthwise for more marinade coating.

 

450 for about how long?

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I cooked the chicken for about 25 minutes after preheating the Akorn to 450, I was using my quick read thermometer to check for doneness.  When I do it again I will do two things differently and see how it works out.

  1. Don't use my smoking stone - use direct heat
  2. When I put the chicken on, open the vents to keep the heat coming strong

I followed the recipe seen in the following video.  Note the subtitle amounts are wrong, it says like "1 teaspoon" and he's throwing in a couple of tablespoons.  He says "2 tablespoons of oil" and dumps in like 1/2 cup, so ignore those subtitles and guesstimate along with the chef :)  I did two whole chickens cutup and needed 2 cups of plain greek yogurt, you can buy two of the individual yogurt cup thingies and that's about right amount of yogurt.  We have a large indian population where I live so I was able to get the kashmiri chili powder, garlic/ginger paste, and garam masala at our local india market.  He uses mustard oil which looks very interesting, couldn't find that so I just used some mustard powder I already had in the spice cabinet and used olive oil for the oil.

 

 

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I used this guys recipe today  ( Harpal singh sookie )  to make chicken tikka, see my post from today Sept 10.  I added a little cardamom, methi, and coriander powder as well but followed the recipe instructions for the rest of it.  tasted just like the restaurant.   

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