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Those of us who cook for few in number may not want to pay for a huge brisket, let alone cook one, so that means we need to know how to cook a brisket flat when they can be found.  I did just that when I found a 2+ pounder this week.  Of course it has to be brined or marinated, and I did the Montreal Steak marinade packet for 24 hours in the fridge.  Used pecan smoke, cooked at 300 degrees to 205 degrees temp, and then rested.  As usual, I cooked in a vessel to catch the juices and fat.  It is very tender, pulls beautifully, and just the right size for dinner tonight!  Pretty yummy.

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I've only done one and it was so chewed I threw it out.  Always been afraid to cook another one.  Maybe this is the impetus to try another.

 

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There were some small briskets on the store last week and I avoided them because of hearing they are hard to cook right.  I may have to go for it now.

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The trick to tender brisket is how long it cooks.

Remember, you can take it out of the cooker when it hits 196/203 and put it in a holding oven at 160 for 14 more hours and it just gets more and more tender, that's what Franklin does.

You an also line a cooler with newspaper and towels (both under and over a foiled brisket), and it will stay near cook temp for a LONG time.

Tinkering with cooking meat for that amount of time is a bit of a chore but the rewards are worth it.

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7 minutes ago, Chasdev said:

The trick to tender brisket is how long it cooks.

Remember, you can take it out of the cooker when it hits 196/203 and put it in a holding oven at 160 for 14 more hours and it just gets more and more tender, that's what Franklin does.

You an also line a cooler with newspaper and towels (both under and over a foiled brisket), and it will stay near cook temp for a LONG time.

Tinkering with cooking meat for that amount of time is a bit of a chore but the rewards are worth it.

 

I read Franklin's book and loved it.  Does he really hold it in an oven like that?  I tried wrapping in butcher paper like he does, but I struggled knowing when it was finished.  But I guess if I did that, I would not have the issue I had with tenderness!  

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Yup that's one of the things he left out of the book..which I agree is outstanding as a starting point for stick burner newbies..

He has to BTW, otherwise he would run out of meat even faster than he does now.

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