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Regular baking pizza stone vs KJ stone


HokieOC
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With my birthday coming up, I've asked for a few accessories for my new Kamado Joe, one of which is the pizza stone.

 

My wife pointed out that we have a pizza stone we use in the oven, which after looking around a bit it seems some people do use.  Does anyone know what the difference is, if any in a KJ/BGE pizza stone vs one of the "regular" ones from a bake shop?  Is there any advantage to getting the kamado specific ones?

 

If not, that will free me up to put another accessory on the wish list!

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@hokiOC - Welcome to the forum, you're just up the road from me.

Consider using a kiln shelf made of cordierite.   I've did a fair amount of research on pizza stones.  Cordierite is a great material for pizza stones.  Check out your local Pottery/Ceramic supplier (Manassas Clay) and buy a Kiln Shelf (Thorley is a brand name you can research) and use it as your pizza stone, 16" rounds are common sizes you can find.  They are typically cheaper in cost,thicker in material than 'typical' oven pizza stones and withstand thermal shock much much better.   My stone (20") was dropped by the ceramic store when they took delivery and it really stuffed up the sides (looked like an animal chewed it), got it for $34, and I've cook pizzas up to 700-750F, it's still going strong. Mostly cooking pizzas in the 500-550F range.

Welcome to the forum, be sure to post pics of your cooks!

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On 9/5/2017 at 10:49 PM, In2Fish said:

@hokiOC - Welcome to the forum, you're just up the road from me.

Consider using a kiln shelf made of cordierite.   I've did a fair amount of research on pizza stones.  Cordierite is a great material for pizza stones.  Check out your local Pottery/Ceramic supplier (Manassas Clay) and buy a Kiln Shelf (Thorley is a brand name you can research) and use it as your pizza stone, 16" rounds are common sizes you can find.  They are typically cheaper in cost,thicker in material than 'typical' oven pizza stones and withstand thermal shock much much better.   My stone (20") was dropped by the ceramic store when they took delivery and it really stuffed up the sides (looked like an animal chewed it), got it for $34, and I've cook pizzas up to 700-750F, it's still going strong. Mostly cooking pizzas in the 500-550F range.

 

Welcome to the forum, be sure to post pics of your cooks!

 

 

Yeah not too far from me at all.  I'll check out the kiln shelf, thanks for the suggestion!

 

And unfortunately forgot to get pix of my first two cooks Fri (carne asada) and Sun (two 9.5 lb pork shoulders) last weekend--was too caught up in getting the food right and by the time I realized I didn't get "after" pictures it was too late.  But I'll be sure to post some future ones.

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Most likely will have to try the stone I have as I'm getting antsy to try a pizza and the bday is a few weeks away.

 

Also can't hurt to get the kiln shelf also and have the two-at-a-time option on the table!

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