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ratherBgrillin

24 inch carbon steel griddle!!!

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So.... I made a new toy this weekend!

 

1/4 inch-thick

carbon steel

24 inch diameter

weighs  almost 50 pounds

 

Being 1/4 inch thick,  this thing is able to hold a stable temperature better than any griddle I've used.. Was able to  hold  a surface temperature of 350° for over an hour. Then  450° for over an hour.   I even cranked it to  650° for 30  minutes ( just because I could). 

fullsizeoutput_5094.jpeg

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How long does it take to get up to temp?  Looks like the airflow is rather restricted sorta like having a heat deflector in the low position on the rack.  That design might greatly benefit from having a 2 or 3 inch diameter hole right in the center.... thoughts?  I bet it would be equally effective at 3/16" thickness and cut the weight down a lot.  I'd love to try something like this myself but I don't have the skills to fabricate any metal.   I may visit a welding shop close to here and see if they can make something similar...

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6 minutes ago, John Setzler said:

  I'd love to try something like this myself but I don't have the skills to fabricate any metal.   I may visit a welding shop close to here and see if they can make something similar...

you read my mind...

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21 minutes ago, ratherBgrillin said:

So.... I made a new toy this weekend!

 

1/4 inch-thick

carbon steel

24 inch diameter

weighs  almost 50 pounds

 

Being 1/4 inch thick,  this thing is able to hold a stable temperature better than any griddle I've used.. Was able to  hold  a surface temperature of 350° for over an hour. Then  450° for over an hour.   I even cranked it to  650° for 30  minutes ( just because I could). 

 

 

Looks great,  and at 50 pounds wow.   not sure I would want to lift it.   I was thinking slightly smaller for more air flow, or as John mentioned, a hole in the middle

 

any idea how this vs stainless would compare?

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I just ordered something similar to this, but with a big donut hole in the center... 3/8 thick, not sure how big the center hole is... Got it in BigJoe size, with the grill-grate insert for $170 shipped.  They've got a 25% off coupon thru the 22nd.  Weekend breakfasts here I come!  

 

https://www.arteflame.com/product-page/arteflame-18-kamado-style-cooktop

 

 

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Looks to me like there is plenty of area for air flow.

 

I use one of these on my KJ Jr.:

 

Screen Shot 2017-09-21 at 2.45.07 AM.png

 

It is 12.5" diameter which leave a bit more than 1/4" all around the griddle.

 

Here is a thermal pix I took and posted in another thread here a year or so ago:

 

post-8287-0-14454600-1459451420.png

 

The center hot spot was about 550°F.  The bright ring around the circumference of the griddle was a constant stream of very hot air. It was so hot I need to wear a long bbq glove to prevent my arm from getting scalded when flipping burgers.

 

On the Big Joe I'm guesstimating that even with a 24" steel plate the surface area available for airflow around the circumference of the plate is greater than the surface area of the hole in the top of the dome.

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With so little airflow my concern would be super heating the firebox and outer shell below it. Fireboxes are there to shield the extra heat from the outer shell. You have effectively made the entire bottom of the kamado (firebox and outer shell) a firebox. I would worry about thermal stress on the outer shell. 

 

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Hey guys, thanks for the replies, and suggestions.

 

 John:  Takes about as long as my cast-iron griddle to hit temp.    As for airflow, my initial idea was to purposefully  restrict it.  Was hoping  to avoid temperature spikes while cooking with the lid open for extended periods of time.   The other day, I  held a surface temperature between 350, and 375 for almost an hour with the lid open.   Perfect for cooking pancakes, eggs, hash browns,  etc..   I am considering extending the holes I cut on the sides.   Initially the holes  were  to lift the griddle out of the grill.   Extending these by a few inches on either side might increase airflow slightly,  but more importantly, give me a  place to push grease and  other food into the fire.   Also considering cutting the entire thing in two,  which would leave one long gap down the middle.   Could push the two sides together to restrict airflow,  or spread them apart to leave a three-quarter inch gap down the middle. 

 

John / In2fish :   Full disclosure.  I to lack the necessary metal  fabricating skills/equipment  to have pulled this off alone.  I do however, have friends with plasma cutters.

 

In2Fish:   Stainless vs.  carbon steel.  Went with carbon steel for its ability to be  “seasoned”, and become virtually nonstick.   Cooking pancakes, eggs, hash browns on stainless steel  can be done,  but isn't nearly as much fun.    Also, the crust you can achieve on burgers, steak, etc. .. is.....well...... yummy.  Oh, and stainless steel is expensive. 

 

Ckreef:  Never once thought about “ super heating the firebox”.  I will definitely look into this further.   I’m thinking about placing the  grate  thermometer in between the  firebox and outer shell to see what temperatures are reached in that compartment.   Do you have any idea what temperature range would be acceptable? 

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15 minutes ago, ratherBgrillin said:

... Ckreef:  Never once thought about “ super heating the firebox”.  ...

This was my first thought when I saw this thread. I then saw your implementation photo, and my concerns were allayed. 

 

I'm new to Kamados, but understand air flow control. If I leave the lid open, my Akorn becomes a blazing fire very quickly, regardless the bottom vent setting, because fresh air is drawn in around the perimeter. Your griddle design fits close to the perimeter, making the griddle itself a "lid," with the holes and gap around the perimeter acting as the top vent.  You may retain some temperature control capability with the bottom vent. 

 

And so my only add is an adjustable vent on the griddle,.

 

Have fun,

Frank

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1 hour ago, Stile 88 said:

too bad it wasnt cut in half excellent idea very nicely done my concern would be what ck said as well super heating the firebox

 

At this point I have seen a number of people running double D&C griddles.  That concern has been proven less of an issue. 

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5 hours ago, ratherBgrillin said:

Hey guys, thanks for the replies, and suggestions.

 

 John:  Takes about as long as my cast-iron griddle to hit temp.    As for airflow, my initial idea was to purposefully  restrict it.  Was hoping  to avoid temperature spikes while cooking with the lid open for extended periods of time.   The other day, I  held a surface temperature between 350, and 375 for almost an hour with the lid open.   Perfect for cooking pancakes, eggs, hash browns,  etc..   I am considering extending the holes I cut on the sides.   Initially the holes  were  to lift the griddle out of the grill.   Extending these by a few inches on either side might increase airflow slightly,  but more importantly, give me a  place to push grease and  other food into the fire.   Also considering cutting the entire thing in two,  which would leave one long gap down the middle.   Could push the two sides together to restrict airflow,  or spread them apart to leave a three-quarter inch gap down the middle. 

 

John / In2fish :   Full disclosure.  I to lack the necessary metal  fabricating skills/equipment  to have pulled this off alone.  I do however, have friends with plasma cutters.

 

In2Fish:   Stainless vs.  carbon steel.  Went with carbon steel for its ability to be  “seasoned”, and become virtually nonstick.   Cooking pancakes, eggs, hash browns on stainless steel  can be done,  but isn't nearly as much fun.    Also, the crust you can achieve on burgers, steak, etc. .. is.....well...... yummy.  Oh, and stainless steel is expensive. 

 

Ckreef:  Never once thought about “ super heating the firebox”.  I will definitely look into this further.   I’m thinking about placing the  grate  thermometer in between the  firebox and outer shell to see what temperatures are reached in that compartment.   Do you have any idea what temperature range would be acceptable? 

 

I would still consider adding a 3-4 more holes at the edge to allow heat to escape.  You don’t want to trap too much heat down below since you would increase the odds for cracking your base or firebox.

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Really neat! I am enjoying my blackstone very much, and if I did not have it I would consider doing something similar. I am very happy to have the kamado to heat up salt blocks for similar searing.

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I am in love! I think I would want something a little thinner and smaller, 50 lbs is a bit over the top for me. I'm looking for something similar with a lip for wetter foods. I wholeheartedly agree on the use of carbon steel. Lodge makes a massive 17" camp skillet that I am lusting after. But this, this is amazing! Very nice!

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On 9/21/2017 at 6:41 PM, Charcoal Addict said:

 

I would still consider adding a 3-4 more holes at the edge to allow heat to escape.  You don’t want to trap too much heat down below since you would increase the odds for cracking your base or firebox.

I can only hope the OP realizes that putting more holes in the plate will increase air flow to the fire, causing the calamity you seek to avoid. 

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