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The blue flame you saw is caused by the off gas from the charcoal.  When wood burns including charcoal it emits gas. The gases ignite much the same as natural gas, propane or methane.  That is not unusual.  It's just not as obvious with small fires.

Maybe light your Kamado in a couple of spots next time and catch your temps on the way up before they get out of control.

I found it easier to cook pizza with a laser thermometer.  I use it to read the surface temp of my pizza stone, that way I know where I am.

You can't count on your pizza stone being the same temp as your dome thermometer in fact it likely won't be.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Rip said:

I am now having second thoughts when I think about peeping through the top vent...

 

I've done that before (not with the afterburners engaged).

 

I heard a crackling noise and smelled burning hair...  Leapt back screaming :-D 

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On 9/25/2017 at 1:15 PM, Dub said:

Dayum.

 

I'd say you pushed the envelope on that cook.  

 

Full blown nuclear.

 

Rocket Man has nothing on you......the kamado flash from that could have been enough to leave a crater.

 

I used to run my Akorn and my BigJoe fairly hot on some cooks.  I adopted the use of the Smokeware's rain vent.   I could never really get the grill superhot with that thing on.  As a result, I discovered that for the cooks I do it wasn't really necessary to do so.   Even on pizza....I tend to use dough bought in the bakery section of the supermarket.  It cooks fine at 400-500.   

 

If I ever get into making my own dough.....I may have to start running hotter and get accustomed to the blue flame of peace.

 

That reminds me....I need to do a higher temp burnoff on my BigJoe....and load it down with every single grate from all grills in there and let it ride.  I think I'll get around to doing that later this afternoon.

 

Glad you had a backup pizza.

 

 

 

 

Two points to consider  on a "burn off" - 1) anything put  in there with a powder coat finish (like the top vent) will lose the powder coat.  2) extra high temps may kill the stainless steel characteristics and it may then rust and might not recover.

 

Here is an article on that regards stainless  https://www.polymersolutions.com/blog/why-does-stainless-steel-rust/ 

 

And an excerpt from the article:

 

.....A less common form of rusting in stainless steel is after the stainless has been exposed to very high temperatures, often in the 750-1550°F range (400-850°C)1. This type of corrosion is often seen in welding applications in which stainless is heated and then cooled. If this happens, “sensitization” can occur which is where the carbon and the chromium bond together in the stainless steel and form carbides. These carbides situate themselves at the stainless steel grain boundaries, and the grain boundaries become deficient of chromium. With lower chromium concentrations at the grain boundaries, the chromium oxide protective layer can become discontinuous and rusting becomes possible. “Sensitization” can ruin stainless steel forever; however the damage can sometimes be mitigated with complex heat treating....

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23 minutes ago, Smokehowze said:

 

Two points to consider  on a "burn off" - 1) anything put  in there with a powder coat finish (like the top vent) will lose the powder coat.  2) extra high temps may kill the stainless steel characteristics and it may then rust and might not recover.

 

Here is an article on that regards stainless  https://www.polymersolutions.com/blog/why-does-stainless-steel-rust/ 

 

And an excerpt from the article:

 

.....A less common form of rusting in stainless steel is after the stainless has been exposed to very high temperatures, often in the 750-1550°F range (400-850°C)1. This type of corrosion is often seen in welding applications in which stainless is heated and then cooled. If this happens, “sensitization” can occur which is where the carbon and the chromium bond together in the stainless steel and form carbides. These carbides situate themselves at the stainless steel grain boundaries, and the grain boundaries become deficient of chromium. With lower chromium concentrations at the grain boundaries, the chromium oxide protective layer can become discontinuous and rusting becomes possible. “Sensitization” can ruin stainless steel forever; however the damage can sometimes be mitigated with complex heat treating....

 

Good post. That is why SS grates rust. It's just light surface rust but rust none the less. 

 

Most people don't know that. 

 

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On 28/09/2017 at 8:30 AM, Smokehowze said:

Just wait till you do that again (hopefully only accidentally) and the color of the red ceramic changes.  That is the point where shut the vents with a stick (bottom first) and run is an appropriate  response.  I tell ya you only go there once! 

I don't think i've ever been to the place where my red went to orange...  hopefully i'll keep my red bits red

 

 

On 28/09/2017 at 8:39 AM, Smokehowze said:

 

Two points to consider  on a "burn off" - 1) anything put  in there with a powder coat finish (like the top vent) will lose the powder coat.  2) extra hig

Everything you have said there:

a) I don't understand

b ) terrifies me

 

I therefore shall pull an ostritch and stick my head in the sand until such time as my KJ ####s itself and i have to face reality

 

On 28/09/2017 at 9:04 AM, ckreef said:

 

Good post. That is why SS grates rust. It's just light surface rust but rust none the less. 

 

Most people don't know that. 

 

I am among most people

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