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    • By Tarnation
      Dumped in the last of my Cowboy lump for a Saturday night pork butt. If you've seen any of the negative comments on Cowboy I didn't have any problems with the bag I had.  It was definitely a lot smokier start than my old KJ Big Block, but produced good food. See you smoke Cowboy! Up next is a bag of RO XL cut should be fun.  For now I've got a pork butt to cook.


    • By JeffieBoy
      My daughter grabbed up some fresh, wild Sockeye filets at Costco a few weeks ago.  She dropped them into our freezer since she didn't have room in hers.  Yesterday, she asked us to pull two out to defrost for a dinner.  They were just around a pound each. They sat in the sink for three hours at which point she called and advised that she cancelled dinner due to a sudden stomach ailment.  We put them into the fridge then decided today that we should cook them up to prevent spoilage.  This afternoon, I made a brown sugar and kosher salt brine and soaked the fillets for just under two hours.
       
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      More photos to follow as we finish up.
       

    • By Tarnation
      Smoke rolls early in the morning for this rack of ribs and a prime brisket.  Binder is mustard, rub for the ribs is a Traeger rub I poached from dad, rub for the brisket is Thundering Longhorn beef rub. I'll keep you updated.



    • By Burgy12
      First time posting here and I need some help- this year the torch has been passed to me to cook Christmas dinner for my family (10 people). I purchased my KJ Classic II 3 weeks ago and thought I’d give Prime Rib a shot. I’m new to smoking/grilling but I’ve loved my KJ so far and cooked some killer dinners already. Confidence was high, did my research, purchased 11lbs of Prime Rib From a local butcher and took it home. 
       
      First mistake: I thought I had ordered boneless PR - nope, bone-in... butcher had already cut the bones and retied to the meat. I thought I should just cut it off and proceed as planned. Well I cut the bones off and saw some thick chucks of fat (fat cap?) and took those off as well. trimmed a lot of fat off the back as well because it seemed too thick. Tied back up with butcher twine and now it’s sitting in the fridge seasoned with salt,pepper, garlic powder and wrapped in plastic. 
       
      After watching numerous YouTube videos of people cooking with the bones attaching & properly trimming their PR - I’m terrified that I butchered (no pun intended) this meat and took out all the flavor removing the bone rack & fat cap. Im also worried that the meat will sit in the fridge seasoned too long and the meat will dry out as a result.  The cook will be tomorrow around noon which means it will sit about 36 hours seasoned. 
       
      Any ideas to help this rookie save this cook is much appreciated!
      I’d love Malcom Reed or John Setlzer to just give me a pat on the back and tell me it’s going to be ok haha
       
      P.S. I’m planning on adding a wet rub over the PR about an hour or two before throwing it on the Joe tomorrow: cooking low&slow over indirect heat around 225-250 until internal temp hits about 120 - removing and letting rest while I crank up the Joe to 500 for a quick reverse sear. I also still have the bone rack and not sure what to do with it. 

    • By pmillen
      I smoke-roasted this in a Karubecue C-60 stick burner but previous cooks were done in a Cookshack Fast Eddy PG500 pellet pit.  I think it would cook up well in a kamado.  It's the best thing I've ever cooked.
       
      I doubled the recipe for a dinner party.
       
       
      Ingredients
      One bone-in pork loin roast
      2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
      2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves
      2 teaspoons dried sage leaves
      1 teaspoon garlic powder
      Salt and pepper to taste
       
      Optional Pan Sauce 
      ¾ cup dry vermouth or white wine
      1 cup water
      Salt and pepper to taste
       
      Instructions

      1.  Trim off unneeded fat and silverskin to expose the meat to the rub.
       

      2.  Rub the roast all over with mustard.  Sprinkle it with the thyme, sage, garlic, salt and pepper, patting so the seasonings will adhere.
       
      3.  Put the loin back in the refrigerator for a couple of hours.
      4.  Preheat pit to 350° F.
      5.  Place the loin in the pit, bones down, until it reaches an internal temperature of 145° to 150° F.
       

      6.  Remove the roast from the oven, place it on a cutting board, tent it with foil, and let it rest for 20 minutes.
       
      Meanwhile, if desired, make a pan sauce
      7.  Place roasting pan over high heat. 
      8.  Add the vermouth and water. 
      9.  Bring to a boil, scraping up all the browned bits. 
      10.  Continue to boil until reduced by about half.
      11.  Slice the pork into chops and serve, drizzling each serving with the pan juices.
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