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2 hours ago, John Setzler said:

 

.  My next video coming out is a rotisserie cook of a 20 pound turkey with the lid open for the entire cook.

 

Thats a video I can't wait to see! Did my first roti turkey Thursday. I have spun birds and meat before but not a turkey. It was delish. Did a spatchy too. And a prime rib. 

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Turkey 101   What you need to know about preparing and cooking your turkey   By: John Setzler December 5th, 2017   Choosing a Turkey:   Size:  

Well, Thanksgiving is over and the 38.4# turkey got rave reviews from our dinner guests!! As I noted earlier, I did not expect that the fresh turkey I ordered would be anywhere this size. I was hoping

@Panchango @brandon78   I updated the original post to accommodate your suggestions...    

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This is an excellent post! The only thing I might add, and it's a minor quibble at that, would be a drip, or roasting pan under the bird to catch the drippings to both prevent flareups and save for gravy.

 

My spatchcocked turkey on the big Joe was awesome. Although cutting out the backbone was a bear. I need new shears. As per usual, I forgot to take a picture of the finished product.

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  • 11 months later...
6 hours ago, NickM said:

Thanks for the great guide. If I'm going indirect heat with the stone deflector, should I still spatchcock the turkey? Does spatchcocking the turkey add more smoke flavor than not? Thanks! 

 

I would not worry about adding 'more' smoke flavor to a turkey.  If you are not careful you will over smoke the turkey and it will taste horrible :)  As for spatchcocking or not, it's up to you.  

 

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John, I’m a bit concerned about the cooking temp you are talking about here. I have a 21lb turkey I’m going to cook and based off the article your linked if I cook that turkey at 350 for 4ish hours and it gets up 140-150 degrees in the breast, then the legs would be in the 160 range and it should be safe for everyone to eat? 

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17 hours ago, Plaid Palace said:

John, I’m a bit concerned about the cooking temp you are talking about here. I have a 21lb turkey I’m going to cook and based off the article your linked if I cook that turkey at 350 for 4ish hours and it gets up 140-150 degrees in the breast, then the legs would be in the 160 range and it should be safe for everyone to eat? 

 

If you have any concerns about safety you should cook your turkey to 165°F in the breast.  In the article, I tell you what the USDA guidelines are and then tell you how I cook mine.  140 is not anywhere near high enough.  I never mentioned 140.  I make sure i get to 150.

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On 11/24/2017 at 2:50 AM, John Setzler said:

What would you add or take away from this as a document for beginners?

 

Hi John,

 

This is a fantastic and helpful read like all of your content. A bit late to the party as a new joiner to the forum however I have a question about stuffing. Traditionally (for my family at least) is we brine the bird and stuff it with a giblet, pork mince, aromatics and bread stuffing and cook it in a regular oven.

 
I want to attempt a Kamado Turkey this year and I have an air cooled, fresh never frozen 13 lb bird on order. 

 

With all the videos/recipes I have found online so far, they either go without stuffing, just use aromatics (large onion and apple portions for example), or butterfly/spatchcock the bird. Is there something I am missing as to why I have not seen a traditionally stuffed bird cooked in a Kamado style cooker?

 

I don't have a JoeTisserie and so was planning on an indirect whole bird stuffed or failing that, the spatchcock approach.

 

Thanks for the help!

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On 11/23/2017 at 10:50 AM, John Setzler said:

What would you add or take away from this as a document for beginners?

John, I have smoked turkeys on my grill for years. I became a Kamado Joe Classic user about 4 years ago and love the turkeys I have done on the KJ. I have a new challenge this year. The fresh turkey that we got ended up being 38#!! Did not want or expect that, but it is the last one they had. We have a dozen people for Thanksgiving, so it will more than suffice. However, can I do it on the Classic? I did not think it would fit, but when we got it home, I tried it and it will just fit with the lid closed. However, it takes up almost all the grill space. Will that be a problem? I will brine it for 24 hours and then plan to grill it at 350 degrees. How long do you think I should plan on for grill time? Any advice will be appreciated.

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46 minutes ago, cmandsager said:

John, I have smoked turkeys on my grill for years. I became a Kamado Joe Classic user about 4 years ago and love the turkeys I have done on the KJ. I have a new challenge this year. The fresh turkey that we got ended up being 38#!! Did not want or expect that, but it is the last one they had. We have a dozen people for Thanksgiving, so it will more than suffice. However, can I do it on the Classic? I did not think it would fit, but when we got it home, I tried it and it will just fit with the lid closed. However, it takes up almost all the grill space. Will that be a problem? I will brine it for 24 hours and then plan to grill it at 350 degrees. How long do you think I should plan on for grill time? Any advice will be appreciated.

 

 

I am surprised it fit.  I could not close the dome on my big joe on a 41 pounder without the thermometer probe poking into the turkey.  I have no idea how long that will take to cook.  It's twice the size of anything I have ever cooked.  It's a lot larger than I would ever attempt on a classic so, unfortunately, you are on your own here.   Let us know how it goes!

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I am going to go for it (like I got a choice now). I did not notice a problem with the temperature probe when I tried it, but will position it so the breast of the turkey (high point) is in the back of the grill away from the probe. Wish me luck :roll:  I will let you know how it goes.

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Great guide to Kamado turkey cooking. I found a nine pound all natural (but frozen) turkey. Should be plenty for my three person Thanksgiving meal. Going to Spatchcock it and cook it in the WFO in my handmade Caserole pan from Portugal. Wish me luck - I'll probably need it - LOL. 

 

It's only Mrs skreef and Hawke. If I totally screw it up we still have a 1/4 bone in Honey Baked Ham :)

 

 

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On 11/20/2018 at 9:45 PM, ckreef said:

Great guide to Kamado turkey cooking. I found a nine pound all natural (but frozen) turkey. Should be plenty for my three person Thanksgiving meal. Going to Spatchcock it and cook it in the WFO in my handmade Caserole pan from Portugal. Wish me luck - I'll probably need it - LOL. 

 

It's only Mrs skreef and Hawke. If I totally screw it up we still have a 1/4 bone in Honey Baked Ham :)

 

 

@ckreef Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours! Also good to see you post I haven't read much lately.

 

Scott

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2 hours ago, Scott Roberts said:

@ckreef Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours! Also good to see you post I haven't read much lately.

 

Scott

 

TY Scott, happy Thanksgiving to you too. Been busy with work and the game room. Haven't done a lot of post worthy cooks lately. 

 

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