Jump to content

Turkey 101


Recommended Posts

On 10/27/2021 at 8:28 AM, A.O. said:

Alrighty then.. Been looking and no one has been stocking turkeys yet... then finally they showed up so the wife procured a pair of matching ten pounders, great for the experiment!! This weekend I'll be out of town so next weekend will be my practice weekend!!

I am planning on spatchcocking this bird and then brining it. I've wet brined a lot of birds but never tried dry brining and I'm not sure which way I will go wet or dry... any ideas/ arguments on this aspect of it?

Also.. thawing.. I've always "known" to thaw in a ice water bath but I'm seeing in this thread the idea of refrigerator thawing , that would work out great as I could thaw it over the weekend, then brine it for 2-3 days and cook it on Thursday which would be the perfect scenario... sound like a good plan or no???????

 

Cant wait to give a go to my first Kamado turkey!

 

I have done multiple day brines and have not liked the texture of the meat post cook. I use an apple cider, honey, salt, brine and leave my bird  in over night Wednesday and wash it off Thursday morning. The idea behind brining, as I understand it,  is to let the salt pull liquid into the birds flesh. I am thinking over night is plenty for that to happen.  I dress it with olive oil, kosher salt,  and  Simon and Garfunkel herbs, and let it air dry uncovered in the fridge for a couple hours before the cook. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So these are a couple butterballs, it says no hormones or steroids and an 8% of fluids(I forget what right now, maybe just water) and spices. Yep $1.48 a pound but I'm anxious to do a test run so we got them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:

I have done multiple day brines and have not liked the texture of the meat post cook. I use an apple cider, honey, salt, brine and leave my bird  in over night Wednesday and wash it off Thursday morning. The idea behind brining, as I understand it,  is to let the salt pull liquid into the birds flesh. I am thinking over night is plenty for that to happen.  I dress it with olive oil, and  Simon and Garfunkel herbs, and let it air dry uncovered in the fridge for a couple hours before the cook. 

I have only ever done a salt and water brine and like the results, I'll probably stick with that. EVERYBODY loves my chickens, hope this does as well.

Have your multiple day brines been wet or dry?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, A.O. said:

no hormones or steroids and an 8% of fluids

Haven't done a turkey on a kamado, but my concern with moisture is that there will be too much of it, rather than not enough.  The chickens I've done have all been much moister than the BBQ I did over a more conventional grill, or an oven.  So they add fluids to a turkey to make it moist enough for other methods of cooking, that seems superfluous for kamado cooking. 

 

So my planned approach wass KISS - dry it, then oil, salt, garlic salt and black pepper a couple hours before it goes on the rotisserie.  Someone let me know if their experience says I'm going down the wrong path.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Boater said:

Haven't done a turkey on a kamado, but my concern with moisture is that there will be too much of it, rather than not enough.  The chickens I've done have all been much moister than the BBQ I did over a more conventional grill, or an oven.  So they add fluids to a turkey to make it moist enough for other methods of cooking, that seems superfluous for kamado cooking. 

 

So my planned approach wass KISS - dry it, then oil, salt, garlic salt and black pepper a couple hours before it goes on the rotisserie.  Someone let me know if their experience says I'm going down the wrong path.

So you have a joetisserie for a classic? I'm curious how it fits. How big a bird? I debated getting a joetisserie but decided against it.. so expensive and I probably wouldn't use it that much, but then again...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, A.O. said:

How big a bird?

About a 14 lb bird. Eyeballing it, it will be tight (considering you want good circulation around it, and spinning will make it more interesting) but think it will fit.  

 

Fallback spatchcock, or oven if both fail.  But I'm an optimist.

 

Yeah, it was pricey.  Especially compared to generic rotisserie setups.  Got the Atlanta Grill Store deal, but still....

 

But it was the rotisserie chicken and the reverse-seared steak that made Mrs. Boater say the grill was worth it.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, A.O. said:

So these are a couple butterballs, it says no hormones or steroids and an 8% of fluids(I forget what right now, maybe just water) and spices. Yep $1.48 a pound but I'm anxious to do a test run so we got them.

The 8% fluid is probably a salt solution, hard to avoid and there are fresh turkeys with no added solutions,  but you will probably have better results wet brining if you had a bird with no added salt solutions.  I have both wet and dry brined my turkeys, spatchcocked and rotisserie.  All were good, but I have to say my favorite is fresh turkey, wet brined using Alton Brown's recipe, and then cooked on the rotisserie.  I have a KJ classic, and usually look for a 16 lb bird, fits well on the rotisserie or spread out on the grates.  There are usually three turkeys at the table (not including my FIL), one oven roasted, one either smoked or fried, and my grilled turkey, seems the grilled turkey always disappears first. No matter how you prepare it, chances are it will be one of the best you've ever cooked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, GrillnBrew said:

The 8% fluid is probably a salt solution, hard to avoid

I like Alton's formula. There is a popular blend available at BB&B. That mix recommends reducing the concentration by half for a bird that has the solution pre injected. I have had good results following this method. You could do the same with any brine (Alton's).

Re: kamado turkey, technique , fancy brine....lets face it , no matter how you prepare it, turkey is more alike  than not. Roasted, fried, spatchcocked, rotisserie, as long as you don't burn it up, it's still just another turkey.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Getting close.. turkey is in fridge thawed, I ordered a pair of poultry shears that should be here tomorrow.. tired of spatchcocking with your basic kitchen scissors so I thought I'd give these a try. I'm going to cook the bird on Saturday So I can Spatchcock it on Friday and get it into the brine for the Saturday cook.

Now I have to do a little looking and see what temp I want to do it at and for how long. I do my chickens at about 400 degrees for an hour and they are PERFECT.. at least everyone eating them thinks so ;-) , so I'm thinking keeping that same temp but extending the time.. whatcha think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You’ll love those kitchen scissors - life altering tool! Ok, maybe that’s a little over the top…

 

I cook turkey in the 300°-350° range, which is low enough to allow all the fat to render and keep breasts moist, but high enough to get the skin crispy, especially with a butter baste.

 

Enjoy and please post your cook!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, A.O. said:

Now I have to do a little looking and see what temp I want to do it at and for how long. I do my chickens at about 400 degrees for an hour and they are PERFECT.. at least everyone eating them thinks so ;-) , so I'm thinking keeping that same temp but extending the time.. whatcha think?

 

I spatch and cook at 425.  I also separate the white/dark quarters as I cook them to different temps.  I pull and start to rest the breasts when they hit about 150, and dark quarters not before 180 (cause that is the way we like em).  Ballpark for me is about 90 minutes, and longer for the dark quarters.  I rest my turkey for AT LEAST an hour in my cooler before serving...sometimes longer.  Incredibly moist, tender and juicy.  I don't even consider worrying about crispy skin and no one gets anything much larger than a small slice of it after slicing up the meat anyways.

 

We do our gravy the day before (or earlier in the day) with the neck/back/parts taken when we spatched it up along with roasted veggies etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, jark87 said:

You’ll love those kitchen scissors - life altering tool! Ok, maybe that’s a little over the top…

 

I cook turkey in the 300°-350° range, which is low enough to allow all the fat to render and keep breasts moist, but high enough to get the skin crispy, especially with a butter baste.

 

Enjoy and please post your cook!

I will post it, from the time I'm spatching it.. is that a word? Need to show off my new scissors.:-D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, SmallBBQr said:

 

I spatch and cook at 425.  I also separate the white/dark quarters as I cook them to different temps.  I pull and start to rest the breasts when they hit about 150, and dark quarters not before 180 (cause that is the way we like em).  Ballpark for me is about 90 minutes, and longer for the dark quarters.  I rest my turkey for AT LEAST an hour in my cooler before serving...sometimes longer.  Incredibly moist, tender and juicy.  I don't even consider worrying about crispy skin and no one gets anything much larger than a small slice of it after slicing up the meat anyways.

 

We do our gravy the day before (or earlier in the day) with the neck/back/parts taken when we spatched it up along with roasted veggies etc.

So sounds like you quarter yours/part it out, more than just spatching it...

 

I like the gravy the day before idea.. any tips? I usually just wait for the drippings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...