Jump to content

Rotisserie turkey question


Shortyque
 Share

Recommended Posts

tDid the obligatory turkey for thanksgiving, but this was the first time on the Joetisserie.  Truth be told, this was only the third time I ever used the Joetisserie.  My setup was, coals  banked to each side, with an old metal bread loaf pan in the middle.  I filled the pan with water, mainly because I was afraid of grease hitting hot metal and making greasy smoke.  I had air dried the bird for about 15 hours in the fridge, then rubbed it with olive oil.  We sprinkled rub on the outside, and also worked some up under the skin. Also, we injected the breast with garlic butter.  The turkey really turned out tasty and juicy, but the skin was not crisp, in fact, we threw most of the skin away.  Did the water pan cause the rubbery skin?  The water was pretty much boiling, and maybe the vapor wasn't good?  I just can't imaging letting all that grease run into my grill, nor can I imaging the grease dripping into a screaming hot metal pan with no liquid.  Suggestions, comments, criticisms, etc........

DSC00712.2.jpg

DSC00713.2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like a good cook to me. as we seldom eat poultry skin at our house. I would much prefer a turkey that tastes good then one with a so so taste and crisp skin.  However, I would guess your water pan and moisture on and under the turkeys skin pre cook is the culpret in creating moist skin post cook. To stop the contents of your drip pan from frying create a sufficent (at least 1 inch sir space between the bottom of your pan dn your stone) I always try to set my drip pan on a grate with plenty of space below that above the stone. No real need for a water pan in a kamado (Water pans are for the dry er cooking environment of the  smoker genre) Also if you let your turkey or any poltury sit uncovered in the fridge for anywher from 2 to 4 hours to over night, you will get dry crisp skin post cook. 

 

Happy Cooking. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Sounds like a good cook to me. as we seldom eat poultry skin at our house. I would much prefer a turkey that tastes good then one with a so so taste and crisp skin.  However, I would guess your water pan and moisture on and under the turkeys skin pre cook is the culpret in creating moist skin post cook. To stop the contents of your drip pan from frying create a sufficent (at least 1 inch sir space between the bottom of your pan dn your stone) I always try to set my drip pan on a grate with plenty of space below that above the stone. No real need for a water pan in a kamado (Water pans are for the dry er cooking environment of the  smoker genre) Also if you let your turkey or any poltury sit uncovered in the fridge for anywher from 2 to 4 hours to over night, you will get dry crisp skin post cook. 

 

Happy Cooking. re

Thanks.  I agree about not needing moisture, but wasn't sure what else to do.  I really like the sand idea posted above, think i will try that next time.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Shortyque said:

Thanks.  I agree about not needing moisture, but wasn't sure what else to do.  I really like the sand idea posted above, think i will try that next time.  

Sand will stop the splater, but it won't allow you to use the drippings later in the cook. I think you will pleased with what the air space can do for you. I use a drip pan almost every cook and pretty much always collect the drippings. If you have to set your drip pan on top of your stone, you can use 1/2'" or  3/4'' copper elbows as spacers between the stone and the pan bottom.  3 or 4 elbows will make a steady pan base. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Sand will stop the splater, but it won't allow you to use the drippings later in the cook. I think you will pleased with what the air space can do for you. I use a drip pan almost every cook and pretty much always collect the drippings. If you have to set your drip pan on top of your stone, you can use 1/2'" or  3/4'' copper elbows as spacers between the stone and the pan bottom.  3 or 4 elbows will make a steady pan base. 

 

You're right. And while I personally don't save drippings very often (a lot of fat),  for a turkey it makes sense.

 

All that said, the sand serves the same purpose as the ceramic in a kamado--it acts as a heat sink and helps to maintain constant temps.

 

Water will actually prevent the temp from rising much above the 250° mark because when the water hits 212° it turns to steam. As long as there is  water in the pan you'll have a hard time getting temps up to 350°.

 

Such is the wisdom that was imparted to me by the same person who told me about the sand. I have never used water in my smokers...even when doing low and slow. So...if someone disagrees I'm not really in a position to say one way or the other. Just passing on collective wisdom. FWIW...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, DWFII said:

 

You're right. And while I personally don't save drippings very often (a lot of fat),  for a turkey it makes sense.

 

All that said, the sand serves the same purpose as the ceramic in a kamado--it acts as a heat sink and helps to maintain constant temps.

 

Water will actually prevent the temp from rising much above the 250° mark because when the water hits 212° it turns to steam. As long as there is  water in the pan you'll have a hard time getting temps up to 350°.

 

Such is the wisdom that was imparted to me by the same person who told me about the sand. I have never used water in my smokers...even when doing low and slow. So...if someone disagrees I'm not really in a position to say one way or the other. Just passing on collective wisdom. FWIW...

Interesting.  I was totally baffled why temps wouldn't go over 270, even with all vents wide open.  Now I know why!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Sand will stop the splater, but it won't allow you to use the drippings later in the cook. I think you will pleased with what the air space can do for you. I use a drip pan almost every cook and pretty much always collect the drippings. If you have to set your drip pan on top of your stone, you can use 1/2'" or  3/4'' copper elbows as spacers between the stone and the pan bottom.  3 or 4 elbows will make a steady pan base. 

Thanks, I never tried that.  I have some pieces of a broken heat deflector (don't ask) that I could use for spacing between pan and stone.  I don't think that will work for a rotisserie set up though, because there is no stone to put the drip pan on.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/30/2017 at 2:36 PM, Shortyque said:

Thanks, I never tried that.  I have some pieces of a broken heat deflector (don't ask) that I could use for spacing between pan and stone.  I don't think that will work for a rotisserie set up though, because there is no stone to put the drip pan on.  

When I have a set up which does not use a stone, I use a spider to hold a drip pan, if I need one. (Think, a circle of grill rod in the middle with rod legs sticking out to rest on your fire ring, your stone or pan sits supported on the ring suspended in the middle of your kamado by the legs.). Some meats can drip into the fire and not present a major problem. However, chicken and most polutry drippings seem to produce an oily smoke that creates an acrid taste. That combined with the fact chicken and other polutry is a flavor sponge that picks up and retains all flavors, good and bad. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 months later...

I spun one last weekend as well. Your X-rack will fit on the firebowl ring. I put a piece of HD foil on it to try to shunt the drippings into the fire slowly, and it worked pretty well. I may try a metal pie pan that fits in the xrack hole, because there isnt much space between the xrack and the 15lb bird. I had some areas of SERIOUSLY AWESOME crispy skin, and some of regular eh skin. FIrst photo is 2 hours in, second is done (2.5 hours) the blackening is you see is from a BIT OF A FLARE UP that we had doing the final temp, a bunch of fat ran off the foil and WHOMP

 

didnt make it taste bad though.

 

IMG_3781.thumb.jpg.58f8aafe6d14b3dddee688f56dce5e39.jpgIMG_3782.thumb.jpg.584ad054a9a5685081edbda9ed26bfec.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Mac
      I needed to find a way to use my Joetisserie without letting too much fat/juice drip onto the coals (my wife likes rotisserie but without the strong BBQ smoke from cooking).  I found a cheap stainless steel terrine mould which is exactly the right length to fit across the cast iron fire base in my Classic II.  Then I got some 25mm thick vermiculite fire board to fit either side of the terrine mould.  It’s easy to cut & shape but strong enough to withstand regular use in the Kamado Joe.  This left just enough area on the fire base with free holes to let air through from below on both sides.  It was finished off with a little single use aluminium foil to widen the catchment area for dripping cooking juices and protect the top of the vermiculite board.  It’s a bit over engineered, but works perfectly.  There’s plenty space for charcoal and I had no problem maintaining roasting temperature for a good-sized chicken.   For turkey I expect the charcoal will need occasional topping up.  See pictures.



    • By HokieOC
      Finally pulled the trigger on a Joetisserie and can’t wait to start using it. First up want to do a chicken as that seems simple and easy, but given the two pack Costco sells has anyone done two birds at the same time on a KJ Classic? I’ve searched but haven’t found much Info with people cooking two, other than a picture which seems to be a Big Joe. Seems like it might be tight but should make it as long as they aren’t over 5lbs each. Also wondering if that affects cooking time. 
    • By JohnnyAppetizer
      Shelter in place turkey
       

       



       


       

       
    • By Smokingdadbbq
      If you haven't tried dry brined spatchcocked turkey before you're missing out... created a quick how to for those unfamiliar with any of the techniques.
       
      Still working out how to make videos so appreciate your candid feedback.... but not too candid lol jk 
       
       
       
    • By Tarnation
      1 hour in to my first turkey on the Akorn.  I let it smoke @ 250 then upped the temperature to 325 to cook and crisp. More updates to come.

×
×
  • Create New...