Jump to content

brandon78

Wood chunks & Smoke

Recommended Posts

I think I answered my own question tonight, but still would like to get some feedback. I am a novice to using wood chunks in my Primos, but really want to gain the benefit of wood smoke. My concern has been how to balance waiting until the white, billowing smoke is gone versus still capturing the smoke flavor. I decided to experiment tonight with food that wasn't a big loss if things went south (in preparation to smoke a 9 lb. pork belly in the next week). I used Maple wood, as it is what I want to use with the pork belly. What I noticed tonight was once the billowing smoke stopped, I still could smell the Maple wood, leading me to the conclusion that the wood continues to emit it's unique smoke flavor even after the initial burn is done. I guess this conclusion makes sense, since charcoal lumps are nothing more than burnt wood, and they still emit a distinct smell. For some reason, I have assumed I needed to capture the wood smoke early, but I know I need to avoid putting the food in when the smoke is still white and billowing. 

 

Any thoughts or insights would be appreciated. Thanks for your feedback!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely need to wait for the thick white billowy smoke to clear.  You will continue to have smoke throughout your cook if you have several chunks in different spots. However your food will stop taking on the smoke once it reaches a certain temperature. I think.... but there are lots of people much more educated in this matter than myself. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good general rule is to always cook on a mature fire. Another is to avoid open flame, so watch how long the lid's open. 

 

And it's not the smoking-wood smoke you're avoiding, it's white smoke from charcoal. Add chunks of dry smoking wood on top of a mature fire and all you get is good smoke taste. Leave the lid open so that wood flames and you're in trouble.

 

Have fun,

Frank 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This works great:

From CeramicChef

 

I use a 2 Qt lodge cast iron Dutch oven with 4 holes drilled in the BOTTOM.  I fill the smoke pot with wood and then fill in the insticial spaces with pellets.  I embed the smoke pot into the lump pile directly over the fire.  This arrangement injects raw smoke directly down into the fire where all the nasties in the raw smoke are burned and what you end up with is thin blue smoke from the first minute of the smoke.  Note that I have a really big kamado.  That 2 Qt smoke pot fits just fine but may not fit yours.  Try a 1 Qt instead.  I've posted the particulars of this smoke pot several times here and using the search box at upper right hand corner of ever page should get you a picture of the pot, how I load it, and what happens to the wood inside over the course of a cook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/15/2017 at 5:49 PM, brandon78 said:

John421 - Forgive my ignorance, but could you achieve the same thing with wrapping the wood chunks in aluminum foil? 

Yes you can. But what found is that sometimes  the aluminum foil will not hold up. Since I have the room in the Big Joe I started using the 2 qt Dutch oven smoker that Ceramic Chef laid out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...