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The Sous Vide temp was at 136 and I left a waterproof probe in the bag and it took quite a while for it to hit 136 internal temp. From the look of it no one could tell and this really did melt in your mouth. You could cut with a fork off the roast if you wanted to but I sliced thick slices for those that wanted them. It went fast. 

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5 hours ago, bbqboss84601 said:

The Sous Vide temp was at 136 and I left a waterproof probe in the bag and it took quite a while for it to hit 136 internal temp. From the look of it no one could tell and this really did melt in your mouth. You could cut with a fork off the roast if you wanted to but I sliced thick slices for those that wanted them. It went fast. 

 

Again, great job on that succulent looking slab of meaty goodness.

 

Couple of questions:

Interesting idea leaving the probe in the bag - how did you vac seal it with the probe in place?

How long did you leave it at temp before you yanked it out and threw it onto your version of Mt Vesuvius?

 

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If you do a bone piece, I suggest 133 for 24 hours.  Its the perfect medium rare without being too raw.  With prime ribs or fattier cuts, you don't want things too rare.  The texture is too chewy with the meat being too raw.  The trick with prime rib is to cook to a tender mouth feel while maintaining the color and juiciness. 

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