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I know there has been some debate on cooking on a cast iron gate vs stainless steel, but I've come to dislike the cast iron. I'm sort of a lazy griller in that when I'm done grilling I just want to shut it down and come back a couple hours later to throw the cover on and I do a lot of pizza so I'm constantly burning the seasoning off. So I ordered this stainless grate off of Amazon and for $42, it's a really good investment for me. Much sturdier than I expected, very well made fits like OEM.   I'll still use the CI for some things, but this stainless will be my everyday grate. https://www.amazon.com/Stainless-Inches-Cooking-Kamado-Ceramic/dp/B075T3BL29/ref=redir_mobile_desktop?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&ref=yo_pop_d_pd

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23 hours ago, Red River Smoke said:

For me with all the pizza I do, lots, constantly reseasoning that CI. Oh and I didn't intend to include it but you can see the busted center section of my CI grate in the one picture. 

Gotcha. I think I'm too much of a carnivore to have ventured into pizza territory yet!

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RRS that's a really nice looking grate.  I'd like to have the option of SS or C/I.  I remove my cooking grate when doing pizza opting for a 2 stone method but everyone has their own way doing things.  Seems like a good buy to me.

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1 hour ago, K'man said:

RRS that's a really nice looking grate.  I'd like to have the option of SS or C/I.  I remove my cooking grate when doing pizza opting for a 2 stone method but everyone has their own way doing things.  Seems like a good buy to me.

 

Do you have a pic of your "2 stone method" for the Akorn? I want to do pizza frequently and I like CI for most other cooks so...

PS...I have the smoking stone. Will your two stone method work with it?

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54 minutes ago, DWFII said:

 

Do you have a pic of your "2 stone method" for the Akorn? I want to do pizza frequently and I like CI for most other cooks so...

PS...I have the smoking stone. Will your two stone method work with it?

Oddly I don't have a picture of my 2 stone method, but I've been putting the Smokin' Stone on top of my main grate and then I found a pizza stone that fits the warming rack perfectly (it is a little small for a large pizza) and that gives a nice air gap while also getting the pizza high enough to get the top and bottom done at the same time, sometimes I have to turn the pizza 90 degrees or something. This is the pizza stone I bought: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01G7WILD2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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1 hour ago, DWFII said:

 

Do you have a pic of your "2 stone method" for the Akorn? I want to do pizza frequently and I like CI for most other cooks so...

PS...I have the smoking stone. Will your two stone method work with it?

 

I have two Jr's and a Keg so my set-up for the Keg may or may not adapt to the standard Akorn.  See the attached video.  The drip pan they use is quite heavy and porcelain coated.  I know this option of the kit would sit easily on a smoking stone for LNS cooks allowing you to catch drippings.

As for the pizza set-up look at the diffuser rack when it is inverted.  I suspect it would either rest on the Akorn bowl or the tabs or bottom out against the sidewalls of the fire bowl.  Then it's just a matter of arranging two stones one above the other with spacers in between.  The advantage to a rack of this design is that it gets your pizza elevated into the dome and evens out the top and bottom cooking.

 

https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0ahUKEwiHmrC0mNDYAhVH62MKHRzXDaoQtwIIPDAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.broilkingbbq.com%2Fvideos%2Fkeg_accessories%2Fdiffuser&usg=AOvVaw2RmdtjHE9_Rt2v4uSfSKlH

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At what temp are you guys cooking pizza at that you're running into problems with the cast iron grate? I've done pizza cooks as well as high temp sears for steaks and have never had to re-season my grate from those cooks, I just spray the grate down with oil after the cook and shut the vents, letting the oil soak in while the grill comes down in temp. It's really not much work at all and leaves me with a nice shiny, non stick grate the next time I fire it up to cook. The one time I did have to re-season was because the wife was going to cook burgers, lit the grill and walked away. By the time I caught on that she wasn't tending to the grill it was already well past the 700 degrees that the thermometer reads.

 

For what it's worth though that is a pretty nice looking grate and as others mentioned before, go with what works for you. I'm just curious about the kind of temps you all are cooking pizza and such at, or if maybe it's an issue that the grate needed a little more seasoning before such a high temp cook. I've made it a habit of lightly spraying my grate after most cooks, it only takes a few seconds and the results are great.

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I'm normally doing pizza at 500+ on the top stone which is closer to 600+ on the main grate.  I know I could shut is down for a while and then go spray the grate when it gets back to a more reasonable temp, but like I said, I'm kind of lazy in that when I'm done cooking I just want to shut it down and not think about the grill after that.  If the cast iron is working for people that's great, I just am not a big fan on a grill grate, but I do like my CI pans.

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7 hours ago, Red River Smoke said:

I'm normally doing pizza at 500+ on the top stone which is closer to 600+ on the main grate.  I know I could shut is down for a while and then go spray the grate when it gets back to a more reasonable temp, but like I said, I'm kind of lazy in that when I'm done cooking I just want to shut it down and not think about the grill after that.  If the cast iron is working for people that's great, I just am not a big fan on a grill grate, but I do like my CI pans.

 

Completely understandable. There are times where I don't get around to spraying mine as well, or even putting the cover on for that matter on late night cooks. It seems like every time I don't get around to covering it, it rains. That's eventually going to cause my lower bowl to rust out, but it is what it is, I'm not going to be complaining when it happens as it's my fault.

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