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Random Sous Vide Question...

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Whats up guys, lately (winter) Sous Vide has became my favorite way to cook.  I have to tell you, I have gotten pretty damn good at it as well.  Learned a lot about times and temp... etc...

 

Recently I have done some really long cooks.  24 hr Prime Rib... and some Venison.  My question revolves around these long "roast" cooks.  Typically when I am cooking 24hr+, I see a lot of juices in the bag.  This also causes air into the bag as well...  The more juice the more air.  

 

Whats the thoughts on this... leave the bag the way it is with the meat in the juice, or remove all air, all juice and reseal?

 

Looking forward to thoughts and opinions.  Also, looking for reason for your preference.

 

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I just leave it. Add some extra weight to keep it submerged and not worry about it until 24 hours is up.

 

I did 2 pork butts a few weeks back - 6/7 pounders - and got about 3 cups of liquid out of each bag. It was crazy. It's amazing they could lose that much and still be juicy and super tender.

 

What would be the argument for removing the liquid from the bag and re-sealing?

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45 minutes ago, cschaaf said:

I just leave it. Add some extra weight to keep it submerged and not worry about it until 24 hours is up.

 

I did 2 pork butts a few weeks back - 6/7 pounders - and got about 3 cups of liquid out of each bag. It was crazy. It's amazing they could lose that much and still be juicy and super tender.

 

What would be the argument for removing the liquid from the bag and re-sealing?

 

I don’t have any specific reason... The reason I ask though,  is because with air, the bag obviously gets “blown up”... that causes  the water around the bag to now not touching the meat... it’s also sitting in juices (not a bad thing),   For me, there is a reason we originally vacuum seal or take all air out.  Just was curious on this is all!

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I am looking at this same issue on a cook today.  I am doing a pastrami brisket flat segment that weighs about 3 pounds.  I cold smoked it for a few hours then seasoned it and sealed it in a bag (all after an 8 day cure).  The fat and collagen renders out of the meat causing the meat to shrink during the process.  It's OK though. You are experiencing a 'confit' cooking process or a braise of sorts.... I would not drain that until the cook is complete.   With this brisket, I am trying to decide if I even want to drain the bag before I chill it in the fridge.  I haven't made up my mind yet.  I am going for 36 hours at 150°F.

 

20180122_Pastrami04.thumb.jpg.612d6ce3496277210d538761ba89d77b.jpg

 

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45 minutes ago, John Setzler said:

I am looking at this same issue on a cook today.  I am doing a pastrami brisket flat segment that weighs about 3 pounds.  I cold smoked it for a few hours then seasoned it and sealed it in a bag (all after an 8 day cure).  The fat and collagen renders out of the meat causing the meat to shrink during the process.  It's OK though. You are experiencing a 'confit' cooking process or a braise of sorts.... I would not drain that until the cook is complete.   With this brisket, I am trying to decide if I even want to drain the bag before I chill it in the fridge.  I haven't made up my mind yet.  I am going for 36 hours at 150°F.

 

20180122_Pastrami04.thumb.jpg.612d6ce3496277210d538761ba89d77b.jpg

 

 

Thanks @John Setzler... I’ll leave it as is and see how it comes out:)

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5 hours ago, face5535 said:

 

I don’t have any specific reason... The reason I ask though,  is because with air, the bag obviously gets “blown up”... that causes  the water around the bag to now not touching the meat... it’s also sitting in juices (not a bad thing),   For me, there is a reason we originally vacuum seal or take all air out.  Just was curious on this is all!

Ah, I see what you mean.

 

I've never heard of anyone draining and re-sealing mid-cook, but it's an interesting question. 

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I've done sous vide cooks up to and including 72 hours and have never noticed excessive air or juices in the bag to interfere with whatever I'm cooking. Are you vacuum sealing the bag or using zip lock type bags and removing air by the submersive method. It probably doesn't matter much either way. I say leave well enough alone and cook on.

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8 hours ago, aljoseph said:

I've done sous vide cooks up to and including 72 hours and have never noticed excessive air or juices in the bag to interfere with whatever I'm cooking. Are you vacuum sealing the bag or using zip lock type bags and removing air by the submersive method. It probably doesn't matter much either way. I say leave well enough alone and cook on.

 

I use a sealer, not ziplock...  Its literally totally compressed with as little air in the bag as possible.

 

In saying that, I left it alone...  The cook came out amazing!  Ill be posting a separate thread shortly!

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I make the bags extra long and leave room for any air or released gasses to float up away from the meat which usually means I don’t need extra weight to hold it down.  After the first hour or two, you are not transferring any significant heat to the meat, you are just holding it at temp waiting for the connective tissue to break down so no need to worry about the air interfering with the cooking process. Water, air, meat juices arc should all be at the same temp. Especially if you use a covered cooler. 

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I just picked up the Sams unit on close out for $35 and noticed the same thing on my first cook this weekend.  It was a pork butt and the juices and air had me puzzled.   I thought I had a leak in the bag at first.   I did mine in a cooler that I made a Styrofoam insert to put at water level.  I shoved the Styrofoam deeper in cooler to sink the bag in the water once I saw all the air making it float.       I do have another question to add though.   My butt was frozen and had no idea what I was doing, so I added time to the cook.  It did it at 165 degrees for 30 hours which was a mistake.  The meat was a bit dry compared to what I achieve on the Akorn.   Since then I've read that for long cooks, don't bother adding time if starting with a frozen piece.   It was about an 8-9# butt.  What time would y'all suggest for that if frozen.  I've seen 18-24 hours at 165 suggested as a ball park for a butt that is not frozen.  

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20 hours ago, keastman said:

I just picked up the Sams unit on close out for $35 and noticed the same thing on my first cook this weekend.  It was a pork butt and the juices and air had me puzzled.   I thought I had a leak in the bag at first.   I did mine in a cooler that I made a Styrofoam insert to put at water level.  I shoved the Styrofoam deeper in cooler to sink the bag in the water once I saw all the air making it float.       I do have another question to add though.   My butt was frozen and had no idea what I was doing, so I added time to the cook.  It did it at 165 degrees for 30 hours which was a mistake.  The meat was a bit dry compared to what I achieve on the Akorn.   Since then I've read that for long cooks, don't bother adding time if starting with a frozen piece.   It was about an 8-9# butt.  What time would y'all suggest for that if frozen.  I've seen 18-24 hours at 165 suggested as a ball park for a butt that is not frozen.  

I haven't tried a pork butt from frozen. I wouldn't think the extra time would have dried it out. Extra time usually impacts the texture of the meat.

 

Did you salt the butt? I've read that using salt on long cooks can cause a 'jerky' effect. I have some salt in my rub, but not a ton. 

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yeah, I used a rub that has a decent amount of salt, sugar, and pepper in it.  Perhaps that drew more water out of it, but recipes I've seen for SV pork butts seem to call for it.  Butt had been in freezer for 8 months or more so  that had something to do with it too.   I till have one more frozen from same time period and will cook that less time and see what happens, if dry too, then maybe it's been in freezer too long.  I know some say 6 mo is limit for pork.  

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