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face5535

Sous Vide Chuck Roast!

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Decided to do a Sous Vide Chuck Roast!  I had the wife grab one on sale last week..:)
 
Did this one at 133 for 60 hours... As always, Naked (no seasoning in the bag).  The next one I will do is going to be 131 for 72hr)! Took it out, drained the juice into a small pot and brought it to a boil.  I then strained then boiled juice through a coffee filter and seasoned with salt and pepper.  For the meat, I torched it, then sprinkled with a homemade rub I like to use on Prime Rib
Rub Recipe:
2 tablespoon fennel seed
2 tablespoon whole coriander seed
3 tablespoon granulated garlic
1/2 tablespoon minced fresh garlic
1 tablespoon caraway seed
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
2 tablespoon coarse sea salt
 
Note, you don't need to go crazy with the rub.  I then finished the protein in the broiler at 400 for 10 mins!
 
Pretty damn good!
 
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Very nice!  This has become my favorite cut of beef.  I season mine with Montreal Steak seasoning and pre-sear in cast iron, then into the bag with fresh rosemary and thyme 132 degrees, 72 hours, remove, dry and sear again, remove meat, add bag juices and herbs, reduce briefly with red wine, pour reduction over meat, eat without a spoken word, just occasional soft moans...

 

Texture of the best tenderloin ever, but MUCH beefier flavor.

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y4mKmKilnh37Dk-6pgZPuovm4yS1sJ2uAzJRmSFF

     Raw and seasoned.

 

Last summer was the last chuck I SVd.  Two were cooked at 140°F for 30 hours and they were pretty darn good.  There was a soup bowl of jus available for those who wanted it over their beef.  The remainder could've been made into sauce.  I didn't feel the need to sear them, they were plenty dark and looked appetizing.

 

Here's the downside to that cook—the beef came out of the water oven at 140°.  It was sliced and served family style under a ceiling fan gently blowing down.  It was soon much cooler than 140°, cooler than I care to eat.  My guests didn't comment on it, but I think they were too polite to do so.

 

How do you sous-vide users keep food at the table at a good serving temperature?  Do you employ some type of hot plate or chafing dish?

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I do these at lower temps, but my last step is always a fast sear in a 550 degree oven or on the grill.  That heats it up.

 

When I have guests, I heat up the dinner plates before serving - either using the dishwasher, oven warming drawer etc.  I've found that having a "hot" protein to me isn't as important as having a very warm plate to put it on and hot gravy.  

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On 1/11/2019 at 3:53 AM, pmillen said:

How do you sous-vide users keep food at the table at a good serving temperature?  Do you employ some type of hot plate or chafing dish?

 

I feel ya.

Oops, now I have "Ophilia" in my head...

 

 

 

 

 

But back to your question, I pretty much never serve anything straight out of the sous vide (apart from fish bc who cares if that isn't hot, it's fish).  Any meat (beef, pork, lamb, chicken) gets either pan fried, KJ'd or some other sort of high-heat hit.

 

If there's a gap, Thermomix makes fantastic bowls that keep stuff hot until the other stuff is ready:

https://www.thermomix.com.au/shop/kitchenware/thermoserver-round-1l/

 

Great for sides, chips, soups, and pretty much anything that needs to maintain a temp.

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On 3/24/2018 at 6:07 AM, m-fine said:

Why no seasoning in the bag?  

 

Sorry its been a while since I was over here...  The reason that the meat goes in with no seasoning is fairly simple...

 

The first is that based on studies the only thing that can penetrate meat protein is smoke and salt.  Knowing that, when you season before cooking sous vide, most of that seasoning is washed off by the juices that come out of the meat (and mostly dumped out/down the drain). 

 

If you season after, those seasonings get "chared" into the meat/a "crust" is formed, giving it flavor!

 

If you want to try an experiment, cook a pierce of meat... season it up...  cut all the ends off/crust off and see what you actually taste.  If you are cooking on a Kamado, you will get the smoke and salt if it was there.  You will not get any other seasoning that were on the meat... esp if you ensure that the meat does not touch anything other than a clean fork and knife.

 

Many people will not and do not buy it, and in all honesty its not anything I care to debate.  IMO spices are pricey...  I choose to use them after and get the benefits I believe it gives.  If you think that the spices and seasonings give the meat flavor, then go nuts!!

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1 hour ago, face5535 said:

The first is that based on studies the only thing that can penetrate meat protein is smoke and salt.  Knowing that, when you season before cooking sous vide, most of that seasoning is washed off by the juices that come out of the meat (and mostly dumped out/down the drain). 

 

Please help me find a study that shows that smoke penetrates to an appreciable extent.

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26 minutes ago, pmillen said:

 

Please help me find a study that shows that smoke penetrates to an appreciable extent.

 

 

As mentioned, I am not here to debate what your or my beliefs are.  A question was asked and I gave my thoughts... Additionally, I misspoke about the smoke comment.  

 

As for where I come up with my thoughts, read this and it becomes clear (at least to me).

 

https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/marinades-and-brinerades/marinade-for-seafood-and-veggies

 

https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/grill-and-smoker-setup-and-firing/what-you-need-know-about-wood-smoke-an

 

 

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Seasonings don’t behave the same with Sous Vide as they do on a smoker. 

 

I can’t say how deep it penetrates, but the flavor of herbs and garlic definitely doesn’t wash off or stay in the liquid. If anything, it is easy to over herb poultry and pork with Sous Vide. 

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