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Hopefully life will start settling back down soon so I can get back on here and start cooking more often!  I decided I needed to at least get back into the swing of the monthly competitions just to get the muscles flexed again.  As this month's challenge is Salad for Dinner, so I had to give it a crack.

 

With me working in Atlanta, I've fallen in love with Korean and Asian food in general.  One of my favorite new flavors is Bulgogi!  If you've never had anything marinated or glazed with a Bulgogi marinade or sauce, you don't know what you are missing.  For those that don't know, Bulgogi is a sweet and tangy sauce mainly flavored with pear juice.  It works with any meat, but I favor it with any cut of beef you can find.  I'm believe it would even make shoe leather quite palatable!

 

Sadly, in my rush to get this done by tonight's deadline, I didn't take many photos of the process, not that there are a lot of steps to this one. 

 

First, I marinated the steak overnight with a bottled bulgogi marinade, and threw in a little fresh garlic and ginger to punch up the flavor a bit more.  All I had in the fridge was a london broil, so that got the overnight bulgogi bath.

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Next it went on to a ripping hot grill to get some of that great grill flavor.  After a few minutes on each side, she was ready to take off the grill.

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While that was grilling, we cut up the lettuce, cucumbers, bell peppers and made up some homemade Asian ginger dressing.  During that time, I also reduced the bulgogi marinade into a nice thick glaze by adding a bit of honey and cooking it down.  Doesn't it look amazing?!? ;)

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In the rush to get this into my pie hole, I forgot to get pics of the sliced meat, oh well.  Anyways, here is the final product!  

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Again, I highly suggest if you've not yet tried bulgogi, give it a shot.  It's great as a dip with asian foods as well.

 

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After one bulgogi cook I bought a new knife and "enthusiastically" asked our local Korean BBQ place about their sauce. I can imagine the pieces being amazing on a salad. 

 

I would recommend thinly slicing the beef so the marinade can really coat everything. The taste when we did it was amazing. We are planning another bulgogi cook this weekend with "the sauce". 

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38 minutes ago, KismetKamado said:

Great looking cook and entry!  Love the plated shot with the peppers taunting you on the edge. Lol on the bulgogi reduction pic. :)

 

 

I was the only one brave enough in the family to try the raw thai chili peppers.  they were quite tasty and had a nice sting!

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1 minute ago, gotzero said:

After one bulgogi cook I bought a new knife and "enthusiastically" asked our local Korean BBQ place about their sauce. I can imagine the pieces being amazing on a salad. 

 

I would recommend thinly slicing the beef so the marinade can really coat everything. The taste when we did it was amazing. We are planning another bulgogi cook this weekend with "the sauce". 

I ususally do pre-slice and marinade but my brother had gotten me one of these beasts for Christmas so I wanted to try it out.  81KaFd7agrL._SL1500_.jpg.0af924435f635e8157ec89499da46dc1.jpgIf you look closely in the marinated meat pic, you can see all the little holes.  Besides, once the camera went off and it was eating time, you better believe I doused that salad in the bulgogi glaze! haha

 

Bulgogi is so addicting!

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4 minutes ago, CheeseMcGee said:

If you look closely in the marinated meat pic, you can see all the little holes.  Besides, once the camera went off and it was eating time, you better believe I doused that salad in the bulgogi glaze! haha

 

Bulgogi is so addicting!

 

I see it now.

 

Our local Korean BBQ has a weekday lunch bento box with bulgogi or spicy bulgogi in a bento box with a half dozen other things and then another half dozen complimentary appetizers for the table. I go there too often. It is $10.99 per person and I feel like I am stealing from them. 

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2 minutes ago, daninpd said:

That looks like a good cook.  Are the 2 little red guys on the left "friends" or "look-outs"?

They were definitely my "friends" that night, but the rest of the family were looking out! :)

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