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Marty

WOK COKING ON THE BIG GREEN EGG

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i would have added to the original post but can not. This reminds me of watching people cooking on huge woks in take out places.with a raging gas fire below.They also got flash fires in their woks because of the extreme heat.

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Since I have never done this kind of cooking.Why? Do you think it is too hot or is the kamado in danger of being cracked?  I used to stand watching 6 foot directly behind them cooking in the take out places and they left the flames full on and got flash fires in the wok. Only when they finished cooking did they use their knee to lower the flame. But it did seem to me a bit too hot when the oil  instantly vaporized and caught on fire. As I said , know nothing about this style of cooking. I have read that the wok has to be very hot to get Wok Hei.

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For my recent Pollo Saltado wok cook, I did most of it with the dome open, with the bottom vents full open.  I only closed the dome intermittently to help add a little smoke to the chicken.

 

By the way; I really enjoyed the process of seasoning the wok and cooking that first dish.  It tasted awesome and I can't wait to try something else!  I'm thinking bulgogi next!  Here is my first wok cook in pictures: 

 

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The cook looked a little hot to meat. Meat seemed in the wok for a long time given the temp. The green beans had some scorching.

I know because I've done it this way and the dark bitter scorched bits of food seemed to overpower the total flavor.

I end up doing a dance with the wok on and off the coals to get a happy medium with a great high temp sear. The wok cooks

are a great way to expand the dinner lineup.

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On 3/6/2018 at 9:49 PM, Smoke and Awe said:

Yes, always a good idea when you're cooking with an open dome.  I do that when I make paella, etc.

 I    made paella on the kamado and went by a guide on the naked whiz that said that the coals should be all red. On that particular cook I have no doubt that it was WAY too hot.  When I added the liquid for the rice  all of it boiled instantly and gave off a cloud of fog.. It came out great but I ended up dumping a lot more liquid in probably double. That cook was beyond my comfort zone. Some how I have not got around to doing it again. With that cook I do not have any doubt that the bottom vent should have been closed. the longer it cooked the hotter it got. But as I said it came out awesome

On 3/7/2018 at 9:27 PM, BBQMako said:

The cook looked a little hot to meat. Meat seemed in the wok for a long time given the temp. The green beans had some scorching.

I know because I've done it this way and the dark bitter scorched bits of food seemed to overpower the total flavor.

I end up doing a dance with the wok on and off the coals to get a happy medium with a great high temp sear. The wok cooks

are a great way to expand the dinner lineup.

Thanks for the pointers. I will go back and look for the scorching. My instinct said that it was too hot when the oil vaporized and caught fire..I have blackened a steak and as you say bitter, my motto became brown and crusty not burned.

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