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Slicing knife


Cavman
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I have decided I need a new knife. I have a couple of yellow plastic handled Henckels made in Spain. An eleven inch bread knife an 10 inch Chef. I bought them new in the early 90's I have several Old Hickory's, 2 butchers, 7 & 10" a 8" cooks knife, and a 6" boning knife. I have re-profiled them to 20 degrees that are all like scalpels and a couple of Thai made Kiwi veggie cleavers I really like. I am pretty fussy about blade steel and heat treating and keep all my knifes very sharp. I want to add a slicing knife to my arsenal. While I am open to suggestions, I have it narrowed down to 3 knives, all Forschners, all fibrox handles. A 12 inch Granton, 12 inch plain edge, or a 14 inch plain edge. So first decision is plain edge or Granton, then if plain edge, 12" or 14", I am not going to pony up for a 14" Forschner Granton. Most cutting duty will be smoked pork loin, smoked chuck roast and a couple times a year brisket. Of course the occasional turkey breast too. I want to make thinner slices easily than I can now. I can cut thin enough with the Kiwi cleavers but they are to small on big roasts. Do you think the Granton edge makes that much difference? I am inclined toward the 14 inch plain edge, but is it going to be awkward on a pork loin or turkey breast. Seems like overkill for most duty. Is the 12" adequate for brisket. Thanks in advance for opinions. $60 is max budget for this knife. I have read some good things about the Tuo 12" Granton but have seen to many comments about soft blade steel.

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Of my Victorinox knives I have the 12 Granton edge slicer and have used it for larger cuts where my 8" Zwilling slicer just wasn't big enough. 20161003_091334.thumb.jpg.8f1bc4b236f548e07c21fd2239361add.jpg

It does a nice job for thin slices. 

20030995919_4ccbfe44f2_c.jpg

 

I know this is more than what you want to spend but lately I've been using my Miyab 9" bread knife to do my slicing on smaller cuts. 

24815528638_3cff6d0213_c.jpg

It slices through meat like a hot knife through butter.

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I have the 12" Victorinox Granton edge slicer with fibrox handle.  I definitely think the Granton helps with slicing thinly.  The Victorinox knife seems to hold its edge well.  I'd buy it again without hesitation.  

 

 

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8 hours ago, DerHusker said:

Of my Victorinox knives I have the 12 Granton edge slicer and have used it for larger cuts where my 8" Zwilling slicer just wasn't big enough. 20161003_091334.thumb.jpg.8f1bc4b236f548e07c21fd2239361add.jpg

It does a nice job for thin slices. 

20030995919_4ccbfe44f2_c.jpg

 

I know this is more than what you want to spend but lately I've been using my Miyab 9" bread knife to do my slicing on smaller cuts. 

24815528638_3cff6d0213_c.jpg

It slices through meat like a hot knife through butter.

Ive been wanting to get a slicing knife for large cuts. Looked at the Vic before... you like it? Ive been contemplating it or the Mercer 14"

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I also have the Victorinox 12 inch slicing knife. It works great for brisket and other flat slicing jobs. I wouldn't recommend it for anything like a turkey, or anything requiring close in work. I recently added a Yexell Dragon slicing knife for these tasks and I love it.

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2 hours ago, 01lowbird said:

Ive been wanting to get a slicing knife for large cuts. Looked at the Vic before... you like it? Ive been contemplating it or the Mercer 14"

Yes I like it for larger (boneless) cuts. Am I wrong in thinking the Victorinox and Forschner are the same company?

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I actually use my boning knife to remove the breast from the turkey then slice. but thanks for the input. I really didn't expect the Granton edge to make that much difference. And yes it is the same company, not sure of the differences, probably mostly marketing.

 

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18 hours ago, retfr8flyr said:

I also have the Victorinox 12 inch slicing knife. It works great for brisket and other flat slicing jobs. I wouldn't recommend it for anything like a turkey, or anything requiring close in work. I recently added a Yexell Dragon slicing knife for these tasks and I love it.

Correct; I use a boning knife or similar for removing the turkey breast from the rib cage, then the slicing knife to effect clean slices of the turkey breast.  

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I went to order the Victorinox 12" Graton edge knife and they jacked the price $10. I punted and decided to order the Mercer 11" Granton edge for a lot less. It is very high rated. I am sure it will suffice with my sharpening skills. I will give you guys a review once I have some experience with it.

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Bailed on the Mercer as well. Went to Cash & Carry this morning to pick up a clod heart and pork belly. They had a serrated first street slicing knife with very shallow serrations for $16 and change. They are German made steel made in China as well. I have sharpend and gifted other style First Street knives, they all took a good edge. I didn't want a serrated slicing knife, however, I didn't want to spend $40 on a chinese made knife either. I will see how it works, I can return it if I don't like it. Will update post after some use.

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A lot of steak knives are serrated for a reason. Like I said above, "I've been using my Miyab 9" bread knife to do my slicing on smaller cuts. It slices through meat like a hot knife through butter." The only problem is that they are hard to sharpen once they become dull. If you use it only on meat, and have a good cutting board, they won't become dull for a long time.

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Actually, the Spyderco sharpmaker does an amazing job sharpening serrated knives. I was planning on touching this one up before use although it came quite sharp. Also, I think the shallow rounded serrations would qualify more as scallops. Even though the package says serrated. They are far milder than the serrations on my Henckles bread knife.

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Update on the First Street roast slicer. It came reasonably sharp but would tear when cutting a post it note sheet. I touched it up on the 15 degree side of the Sharpmaker. It now cuts the sheet without tearing. First job was a small roast cut from a pork butt and cooked in a NuWave oven. Not much difference between slicing the roast hot or chilled. Big improvement over slicing with any of my cleavers, chef, or butcher knives. Was able to easily cut consistent slices slightly thicker than a nickel. As thin or thinner than the $70 box store electric slicer I had 5 years ago. I am not going to try to make comparisons or speculation about performance to the Victorinox or Mercer slicers. What I can say is, for $17 this knife is certainly meeting my needs making thin clean looking slices.

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