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Marbling is good. This is fat that runs throughout the fibers, the exterior fat is irrelevant, unless you like to eat fat. Wherever you buy your steaks, ask your butcher for prime, you’ll be in good shape. 

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Lots of good advice. Certainly the quality and grade of the steak is significant but, the cut is just as important. A bottom round, sirloin, at least in my experience, is never going to approach the tenderness of a T-Bone, Ribeye, Porterhouse or a filet. Cutting against the grain as @bosco suggested is critical regardless of which steak you choose. My wife also did not like red but it was due in large part to the continuing ignorance many of us possess that that red is blood when in fact it is myoglobin. So I walk her through a little biology class and she resists until she sees me chewing effortlessly on my just medium steak while she is wearing out her jaws chewing chunks of well done flesh. Anyway, I converted her on one of our anniversaries eating $40+ steaks which was a lot back then. She actually tried to take the remainder of my steak but I wasn't having it. :-D

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1 hour ago, CentralTexBBQ said:

 Anyway, I converted her on one of our anniversaries eating $40+ steaks which was a lot back then. 

 

Ummm... isn't this a lot right now, too???? :)

 

Or was your "back then" last week? ;)

 

We don't eat out much, in case it wasn't obvious from the above....  

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1 hour ago, KismetKamado said:

 

Ummm... isn't this a lot right now, too???? :)

 

Or was your "back then" last week? ;)

 

We don't eat out much, in case it wasn't obvious from the above....  

 

Ummm, a lot? A matter of perspective, I guess. Let me do the math in my head for a moment– one komodo kamado divided by one $40 steak– carry the five and– :-D

 

It was a very fine restaurant, perhaps ten or so years ago. Their menu says $69 bucks for the ribeye now. Can't remember if the sides were extra :-D

 

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4 minutes ago, CentralTexBBQ said:

 

Ummm, a lot? A matter of perspective, I guess. Let me do the math in my head for a moment– one komodo kamado divided by one $40 steak– carry the five and– :-D

 

 

LOL!  You got me there!!!!!  Touche’

I’ve got nothing to counter that with.... well done indeed!

 

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Research the reverse sear method. Basically smoke your steak (225-250ish degrees on the dome thermometer) with the deflector in until it gets almost as done as you want it, take it off the grill, take out the deflector and get the coals really glowing and put the steak back on for a min or so each side, just enough to get a good sear on the meat. 

 

I started doing mine that way last summer and they are A LOT better. sounds like you are trying to get them done immediately. Part of the fun is taking your time getting them just right. In my experience I like the results when they are cooked more slowly. they seem to be more juicy even if you get all the pink out. 

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I don't have a grill (yet) OP but let me tell you what I do. 

I was raised on cheap cuts of steak marinated cooked medium well. About 5 years ago my life was changed forever when a buddy suggested I get rid of the marinades, buy a ribeye, simply use salt and pepper, and do medium rare. Since then my passion has been learning how to make the perfect steak and I'd like to say I'm confident in my abilities. 

Now, I use the reverse sear method and then sear on the stove but it works for me. 

Whether I'm buying from the grocery store, butcher, or Costco, my method is the same and turns out very well.

1. Bring home beef, let it sit out for 30-45 minutes. 
2. Rub avocado oil all over steak (high smoke point which is important). 
3. Season generously with sea salt, pepper, old bay, garlic powder, some greek seasoning. 
4. Cook in oven at about 225-250 degrees and depending on the thickness could take anywhere from 40-55 minutes to get the internal temp at about 115 which is my preference as the sear will add another 10 degrees and rest will add another 5 so you're looking at a final product at about 130 degrees. 
5. After it reaches your idea internal temp, take it out, heat a pan with some more avocado oil, fresh rosemary, garlic. heat until it's blazing. 
6. drop the steak in, let it sear for about 1:15-1:30, flip it then add a stick of butter. baste that sucker over and over again to get that amazing crust. Sear another 1:15 minute or so.
7. Plate it and let it rest for at least 5 minutes so the juices can spread out. 

ENJOY. 

 

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My girlfriend used to like medium-well-ish steak.  (I like rare.)  Now that she's had my kamado reverse sear steak she's eating medium-rare steak.  So that's a step!

She won't order steak in a restaurant anymore.  Here's my extremely easy method:

 

1.  Buy pretty good steak.  Her favorite is filet.  I really like it too, so that's what I typically get.

2.  Make sure it's thick.  1" is the thinnest steak I'd even consider.  I prefer 1 1/2" - 2" especially for filet.

3.  At least 2 hours before you want to start to cook it, sprinkle salt on both sides of the steak, put them in the fridge covered.

4.  Start the smoker and try for 225 degrees.  (But don't worry if it's anywhere close.)  I like adding a chunk of mesquite.  It's a strong smoke but you only have it smoking for about 30-40 minutes.  

5.  Take the steaks out and pat them dry with a paper towel.  The salt draws a LOT of moisture to the surface.  

6.  Cook the steaks with a probe to get them within 10 degrees of your goal temp.  I take mine off around 117.  But you can take yours off at 120 and leave other steaks on longer.  

7.  Remove the steak, cover and set aside.  Open the vents fully and let the grill get at LEAST 500 degrees.  I like even hotter.

8.  Sear the steaks for 1 minute per side.  I typically turn them at 30 seconds so I get the cross-hatch pattern.  

 

That's it.  No other seasoning.  Just the salt as the dry-brine.  A little bit of smoke and the actual beef itself is all that you need.  The salt really brings out those flavors.  

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Basically, as mstewart39 says.  Only real difference being, I use a cast iron pan for the sear.  The Maillard reaction (the browning) makes the meat taste better.  Do I want just the stripes to taste better, or the whole steak?  I also use tongs to sear the edges of the steak, for the same reason.

The dry brine is crucial.  I put the steak on a rack, after generously seasoning with salt, over a plate and put in the fridge, Uncovered, so air can circulate all around the surface of the meat.  Also, for reverse sear, do not, as so many do, take the steak out of the fridge and bring to room temp.  I want the meat to be in the smoke as long as possible before hitting my pull point, generally 115 F.

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