Jump to content
Triggaaar

You have a kamado and a WFO - which do you use for what?

Recommended Posts

So, picture the scene... you have a lovely kamado, and you've got a sweet brick built Pompeii style wood fired oven too. Life is great!

 

Which one do you use for what food?

Presumably you'll always use one for some things, but for other meals you might use whichever is clean and ready to go, or you might toss a coin, or maybe it will depend whether you want to sit out next to it for the day or not?

 

Please let me know what you love using each one for etc.

 

Thanks :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's see, I have 3 kamados, propane table top griddle, LG Konro Yakitori grill and yesterday I did my first cook in a brand new WFO. Ask again in a couple of months and I should be able to answer the question. 

 

In the WFO I see pizza followed by bread and casseroles using the residual heat. Probably some CI fish cooks. 

 

Between all my other grill options the WFO will be relegated to very specific cooks after the new toy syndrome wears off anyway. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, ckreef said:

Let's see, I have 3 kamados, propane table top griddle, LG Konro Yakitori grill and yesterday I did my first cook in a brand new WFO.

 

 

A nice little collection. What's your WFO like, thick brick, or a moveable pre-made oven, or something else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thick brick. Here is a link to my recent installation thread. It's a long thread so you might want to jump to the end. 

 

 

installM.thumb.jpg.b17b92791cd1a09cd1cd59167c3f54f9.jpg

 

I would love to see pictures of your oven and cooks you do in it. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, ckreef said:

Thick brick. Here is a link to my recent installation thread. It's a long thread so you might want to jump to the end. 

Lol, I've already read your thread, just didn't realise it was yours :)

 

I would love to see pictures of your oven and cooks you do in it. 

 

 

So would I! Unfortunately I'm just at the planning stage, I don't have one yet :(  I'd like to build it myself, 36" internal Pompeii style oven. I'd build it with firebricks and insulate it.

 

I don't even own a kamado either yet. The dark truth behind my covert thread is that I'm wanting to see what you guys do with each, to help me choose which to go for (first :-D). Of course a kamado is very different to a WFO, but you can do most things with either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the question is about choosing one to buy first - kamado without a doubt. Much more versatile. Kamados do a decent job cooking almost anything. Faster and easier. 

 

WFO's are more of a luxury play toy in the world of outdoor cooking although I'm sure some people would get mad at me for saying that. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, ckreef said:

If the question is about choosing one to buy first - kamado without a doubt. Much more versatile. Kamados do a decent job cooking almost anything. Faster and easier. 

 

WFO's are more of a luxury play toy in the world of outdoor cooking although I'm sure some people would get mad at me for saying that. 

 

 

Thanks.

But people can cook just about anything in their WFO?

Is it possible that you're just extremely experienced in using a kamado, but new to WFOs? I appreciate your feedback regardless, and mean no offence by asking.

 

There is of course a danger that asking the question on a kamado forum will get views skewed one way, and likewise if I asked on a WFO forum, but I've got to ask somewhere :D  That's why my original question was supposed to be a little more subtle, and ask about food types. I'm not as into slow cooking as a Texan, but I'd like to be able to do it. My family also don't have the meat eating appetite of many an American. I'd like to do pizzas far more than a brisket or Boston Butt. But even with that said, you still could be right, hence the question :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Triggaaar said:

I'm not as into slow cooking as a Texan, but I'd like to be able to do it. 

 

This statement says you need a kamado first, in my opinion.  For that and many other reasons..... (again my opinion....) but if you have any desire to do smoking, you need a Kamado or other type of smoker instead of the WFO.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I look at it from a temperature perspective. A WFO is designed to get hotter that other common cooking methods. A Kamado gets close on the high end, retains low-n-slow capability, and does a darn good job on everything in between. It's the flexibility that's so appealing; not much you can't cook on even the most basic one. 

 


Have fun,

Frank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, KismetKamado said:

 

This statement says you need a kamado first, in my opinion.

It does? If I wanted to do slow cooking regularly it would be a no-brainer. But I'll want to do pizzas a lot more than a slow cook. And a WFO can keep hold its temperature in the bricks for a long time.

 

I look at it from a temperature perspective. A WFO is designed to get hotter that other common cooking methods. A Kamado gets close on the high end, retains low-n-slow capability, and does a darn good job on everything in between. It's the flexibility that's so appealing; not much you can't cook on even the most basic one. 

Not much you can't cook in a WFO either I believe. Not that I'm leaning towards a WFO, I'm not, I'm just playing devils advocate.

 

Do you guys have both, or just the kamado?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just look at the air flow...

 

In a WFO, the chimney inlet is right above the oven door, which is where all the fresh air enters, and the fire is as far from the inlet as possible. It's all horizontal air flow to and from the fire. How do you build a low-temp fire in the first place, and once you have it, how do you keep it stable for 12 hours? These are high-temp baking ovens, not low-n-slow smokers (although there's a lot you could do with the residual heat). 

 

In all smokers, the air inlet's at the low point and the chimney inlet high in the smoking chamber. This makes for vertical air flow, which creates a thermal siphon  to pull air against some intake resistance. I've been setting the intake air resistance based on exit temps for decades on an 2-barrel offset smoker. A Kamado isn't much different. 

 

I may only own one of them, but I understand how each are designed for their respective purposes. Let's see what @ckreefcooks in it!

 

Have fun,

Frank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would seem pretty difficult to get a Low & Slow cook with a WFO. However, the Native Americans of the Southwest

use a Horno - an adobe brick oven  - for a lot of their cooking. Wiki Reference https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horno

The concept is about the same as using a WFO. For a long cook like a pork butt, they get the oven fired up to

a high temp, place the meat in the Horno and seal it up. The residual heat does the cooking as the temperature drops

over several hours. I'd guess that the same process could be used with a WFO.

 

Also, no problem in asking about a WFO on a Kamado forum since a lot of us also have and use other cookers and are

willing to share experiences and opinions. Which cooker you choose to buy first would depend on your needs, wants and

budget. Let us know what you decide to get.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although it's a brand new experience for me I did have to do progressively hotter burn in cooks. The first 3 were at 150*, 212* and 302*, for 5 hours each. From that experience I do think a low-n-slow cook in the 250*-300* range would be doable. A case of beer iced down in a cooler. A comfy zero gravity chair out by the WFO. You would have to feed the fire with a couple extra small splits about every 30 minutes for around 10 hours. I like doing pulled pork with a vinegar mop so that fits this scenario. A case of beer out by the WFO doesn't sound like a bad day. I'll probably try this one day just to see if I can. 

 

My WFO retains heat overnight so the idea @K_sqrd described would probably work too. I think I would want to wrap it in a thick layer of banana leaves to retain moisture. 

 

@fbov this is probably going to be a 1-3 times a month adventure depending on work. I have a lot of ideas I want to try but it's going to take a while. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, fbov said:

Just look at the air flow...

 

In a WFO, the chimney inlet is right above the oven door, which is where all the fresh air enters, and the fire is as far from the inlet as possible. It's all horizontal air flow to and from the fire. How do you build a low-temp fire in the first place, and once you have it, how do you keep it stable for 12 hours? These are high-temp baking ovens, not low-n-slow smokers (although there's a lot you could do with the residual heat). 

 

Decent brick ones that are well insulated on the outside stay hot for a long time. Having a small amount of wood smoking in their at the start should help with the flavour.

 

Of course that's not a WFO's best attribute, and if you mostly wanted low and slow, a kamado would be better. Just like a Neapolitan pizzas aren't a kamado's forte, but you can get something decent out of them. Being that I'd do pizzas a lot more than low and slow, I wondered whether a WFO would be best for me. There's all the other types of cooking to consider too, hence the original question. Steaks look great in a WFO. I imagine other grilling just needs more skill/practice than with a kamado.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×