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keeperovdeflame

Who Says you can't have fun without a kamado

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I live in the mountains of AZ and face a strict fire restriction every summer. Had a couple thousand acre grass fire just about 10 miles away last weekend, they called it the View Point fire. Took our four houses and about 12 out buildings.  This year the fire restriction on ash producing fires  started in May and will probably go until the Monsoon rains soak the ground in mid August. The fire restrictions a truly a pain when you want to cook, but nobody around here really complains considering the devastation of a wild fire.  Until the restrictions lift, I am cooking on the Weber Summit. Tonights dinner was Spun Cornish Hens and a medley of fingerling potatoes, mushrooms, onions, and baby carrots. You still have to eat, even in fire season. 

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Very nice cook, Keeper!  I bet that pan of veggies was spectacular.  The hens took on some great color.  I have a confession to make based on this post.... can you believe I have never used the rotisserie on my Summit?????  Now I am wondering why I haven't - as those look perfect.  

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2 hours ago, KismetKamado said:

Very nice cook, Keeper!  I bet that pan of veggies was spectacular.  The hens took on some great color.  I have a confession to make based on this post.... can you believe I have never used the rotisserie on my Summit?????  Now I am wondering why I haven't - as those look perfect.  

Kismet,

My best results come from using the infrared with rotisserie at the very beginning of the cook. I set it at about medium heat and then watch it after the first  20 min and then in ten minute intervals, when you get some even color you can turn it down or off altogether and let the cook continue with out it. I like using a pan below the hens to 1. act as a diffuser and 2. to give amazing flavor to anything I put in the pan. (and Yes the fingerling potatoes, carrots, onions, and mushrooms were great. Just use some good olive oil, chicken rub, and keep some chicken broth about 1/2 way up the side of the contents of the pan) Towards the end of the cook when I have about 10 to 15 degrees to go before I pull the hens, I start up the infrared again to finish the color. In my experience, if you use the infrared all the way through your cook, you actually get too much color, and start to char your poultry before your IT is close to target. The IR is a great accessory when you use it to achieve a specific desired result. Happy Cooking. I do hens, chicken, and even baby back ribs, on the rotisserie. They all come out great. I miss being able to use my Egg, but I can't really complain about the quality of the cooks that I can bring off the Summit. 

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8 minutes ago, ndg_2000 said:

Please excuse my ignorance but what is the difference between a hen and a chicken? 

I always assumed they were the same thing. 

chicken is the animal.

 

Hen is Mature Female (pullet is a hen under 1 year)

 

Rooster (or Cockerel) is the mature Male

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5 hours ago, Catsn'doos said:

chicken is the animal.

 

Hen is Mature Female (pullet is a hen under 1 year)

 

Rooster (or Cockerel) is the mature Male

Yup, your right a hen is a female chicken. However, a Cornish Game Hen, while still poultry,  is a different bird. Much smaller than a chicken and much like a quail only a bit larger and commercially produced under the title Cornish Game Hen. . Typical serving is one each.  Available at any good market. Try a couple their great on the grill. 

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21 hours ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Yup, your right a hen is a female chicken. However, a Cornish Game Hen, while still poultry,  is a different bird. Much smaller than a chicken and much like a quail only a bit larger and commercially produced under the title Cornish Game Hen. . Typical serving is one each.  Available at any good market. Try a couple their great on the grill. 

 

You are correct. Cornish are a specific breed of chicken selectively bred for size, like many bantam breeds of poultry.

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Thank you both for the info.

 

I asked the question as I thought you may have been referring to possibly an older chicken  (that had previously been a layer) as I'm told the flavour profile is much richer but unfortunately as they are not breeds for meat you get less on the bird. 

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