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AntinOz

Anova arriving this week...

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Well I had a fun weekend of playing. After the Scotch Fillet on Friday night, tried chicken breast on Saturday. This came out lovely and tender although not sold on the seasoning I put on it.

 

Last night was pork chops at 60C for about 3.5 hours. We were playing with the new seasonings I got from Aldi so we had three different flavours on the pork, all were delicious. This was a strange cook for me as the meat was cooking away inside while I lit up the Akorn for some roast veggies to go with it. Pretty simple fare, potatoes, onions and carrots. This worked really well, the Akorn sat at 200C for an hour to nicely cook the veggies and then opened it up for a few minutes and had it up to 300+ to sear the pork.

 

I must have done something right as my wife was muttering about what to cook tonight after I did three delicious cooks over the weekend. This Kamado and this site have really had an impact on the quality of what we eat, both on and off the bbq! Oh, and an impact on the wallet as well :)

 

Oh, and I still have two weekends to go to get my pizza done for the challenge!

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7 minutes ago, KismetKamado said:

Sounds like you had a great first weekend with the Anova!  One of many to come, I'm sure.  Nice job!  

 

And no slacking on your pizza entry because you're playing with the new toy.... let's make that clear.  :)

 

 

Yeah, I can see it being put to use a lot for pre-packaged meats etc. From freezer to plate!

 

I was trying to form an image of a Sous Vide pizza in my head, but it just wouldn't work. As the number of tools in the kitchen increase, the challenge is going to be choosing the most appropriate tool for the job. There are some really stupid sous vide recipes out there where people are obviously trying to hard.

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3 hours ago, AntinOz said:

This Kamado and this site have really had an impact on the quality of what we eat, both on and off the bbq! Oh, and an impact on the wallet as well :)

 

Yep, yep and yep.... I feel your pain...  :)

 

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The Anova has changed the game for me for steaks and roasts. Not only does it help turn out top flight meat, it makes the entire process much more predictable. 

 

My "perfect" steak formula is salt and pepper then sous vide 130-132 degrees F for 90-120 minutes, then light salt and pepper again and seared for under a minute a side on a HOT cast iron griddle with ghee, light course salt and plate. I can turn out unbelievable steaks on a weeknight now with no stress. 

 

Picture was a weeknight cook of cut down costco prime tenderloin. 

 

 

SousVide.JPG

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14 hours ago, gotzero said:

The Anova has changed the game for me for steaks and roasts. Not only does it help turn out top flight meat, it makes the entire process much more predictable. 

 

My "perfect" steak formula is salt and pepper then sous vide 130-132 degrees F for 90-120 minutes, then light salt and pepper again and seared for under a minute a side on a HOT cast iron griddle with ghee, light course salt and plate. I can turn out unbelievable steaks on a weeknight now with no stress. 

 

Picture was a weeknight cook of cut down costco prime tenderloin. 

 

 

SousVide.JPG

 

We really need a post rating of :drool: for pics like these.  That is bloody perfection.

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On 6/17/2018 at 8:06 PM, AntinOz said:

Well I had a fun weekend of playing. After the Scotch Fillet on Friday night, tried chicken breast on Saturday. This came out lovely and tender although not sold on the seasoning I put on it.

 

Seasonings, herbs, and acids (such as lemon juice) can all have unexpected results from sous vide in my experience. I've given up on trying to figure out what does and does not work. I typically just use salt and pepper for sous vide and then add any other ingredients before finishing.

 

That said, I know other people season or marinade their meat before sous vide just as they would before any other cooking method and they have no complaints, so I'm sure some of it is just personal taste.

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I did a small pork roast last night on the Kamado. Afterwards I realised I had missed a perfect opportunity. I didn't get a decent sear on the roast at the end due to the dangers of reconfiguring the Akorn for direct. I'm not a huge fan of lifting out hot ceramic stones with fires burning under them.

 

Next time it will be a couple of hours sous vide and then onto the Akorn, direct at a reasonably high heat to finish off. Still learning which tools are best for what. The other option would be a second Kamado... hmmm....

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On 6/29/2018 at 9:26 AM, Brave Sir Robin said:

 

Seasonings, herbs, and acids (such as lemon juice) can all have unexpected results from sous vide in my experience. I've given up on trying to figure out what does and does not work. I typically just use salt and pepper for sous vide and then add any other ingredients before finishing.

 

That said, I know other people season or marinade their meat before sous vide just as they would before any other cooking method and they have no complaints, so I'm sure some of it is just personal taste.

 

There are definitely differences in how you should season/marinade with SV.  I have been successfull with salt, pepper, granulated garlic and most leaf type herbs. I pretty much leave out any fats/oils and if using any acids, I keep it light.  The flavor from herbs tends to be more intense, so go lighter on anything that goes in the bag, especially for longer cooks.  

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Just did some sous-vide beef AAA back ribs from Costco....they turned out amazing well.  These things were huge...that white cutting board is around 12" x 16".

 

Pre-seasoned (I have my own rub recipe which is very light on salt/sugar, but heavy on other seasonings) and then into the sous-vide for 48 hours at 145.

 

beefribsbefore.thumb.jpg.b009df4e9a134f01734c2e8aeaa10cdc.jpg

 

After the sous-vide, onto a medium heat kamado with smoke for maybe 30-40 minutes with brushed on glaze mixture.

 

End result....sous vide certainly makes this an effortless cook with 100% predictable results.  Very happy with the flavor doing the smoke after the sous-vide with a higher temp to also develop a crust.

 

beefribsafter.thumb.jpg.45a7198794e41dbf11d634c7133ed9ee.jpg

 

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