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Crisbee Cast Iron Seasoning

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https://www.crisbee.org/

 

I stumbled upon a new Cast Iron seasoning company named Crisbee.  They mix beeswax and soy and vegetable oil to make a seasoning with better adhesion to go the CI surface.  Adding beeswax to the mix is supposed to make the seasoning more durable and less prone to flaking off over time. 

 

They don’t have very good distribution in Canada adding an extra 17 bucks to ship to the cost of the product.  

 

The first thought that comes to my head, wouldn’t be cheaper to just  buy a food grade bar of Beeswax and add it to a Flaxseed oil seasoning yielding the same result.  

 

Is there something extra special about the Crisbee product beyond adding bees wax that would justify buying their conditioner?

 

Has anyone used Crisbee to season any of their cast iron cookware and grates?   

 

 

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I re-seasoned all of my cast iron with Crisbee a few months ago and I've been maintaining it with Crisbee. It does a great job, my cast iron has never looked better.

 

I don't know much about the makeup of the product or if your beeswax, flaxseed oil idea would work

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4 hours ago, BGWolf said:

I re-seasoned all of my cast iron with Crisbee a few months ago and I've been maintaining it with Crisbee. It does a great job, my cast iron has never looked better.

 

I don't know much about the makeup of the product or if your beeswax, flaxseed oil idea would work

 

It’s hard to find out much about Crisbee.  I’m thinking the beeswax is the key component improving the bonding of the oil on the pans.  Beeswax is used for wood  drawer slide.  It’s actually a very good lubricant in it’s own right. 

 

I can see Beeswax having a positive impact on Cast Iron Seasoning.  Crisbee is a mix of Palm oil, beeswax and Soybean oil.  

 

Soybean Oil has a very high smoke point.  I’m thinking Flaxseed Oil and Beeswax would result in a more durable finish vs Soybein and Palm Oil. 

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Yeah, I would not waste time/money.  I've got numerous pieces of cast iron, most of which I've left pretty rough surfaced.

 

My go-to cast iron pan was sanded down to nice and shiny smooth, then I just cooked all kinds of greasy stuff in it.  Fried eggs just slide around in it now...

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I usually use Crisco or 

1 hour ago, SmallBBQr said:

Yeah, I would not waste time/money.  I've got numerous pieces of cast iron, most of which I've left pretty rough surfaced.

 

My go-to cast iron pan was sanded down to nice and shiny smooth, then I just cooked all kinds of greasy stuff in it.  Fried eggs just slide around in it now...

 

I usually use Flaxseed oil purchased from health food stores for seasoning.  It’s relatively inexpensive for the number of  CI units it will season.

 

At 17 bucks in change for shipping on Amazon, the Crisbee is not a viable option for Canadians anyway.  17 bucks buys a lot of crisco. 

 

The concept of using beeswax to improve the durability of the coating has me a little intrigued.   Beeswax is very cheap and easily found.   

 

Some people only use Beeswax for seasoning their pans including some folks working at the Lodge Store and the Woods CI division in Ottawa, Canada exclusively use Beeswax to season pans. 

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I live not far away "the Lodge mother-ship" in South Pittsburg, TN, so I asked them what they use to "pre-season" their cookware at the factory and they told me, "canola oil."  That's it: that's what's on there.  Coat the grates with this, and put them in the (kitchen ...) oven at 400ºF for one hour, just as you would with a piece of cast iron cookware, then let them cool with the oven door closed back down to room temperature.  The seasoning is not on the surface of the metal, but over time is absorbed into it as you continue to use it.

 

Wash off all food residue with, say, a Scotchbrite pad, and a small amount of dish-soap if needed – yes, you can use dish soap – then dry thoroughly with a towel.  Over time a coating will develop that resists food sticking to it, and this coating will not scratch off.  I see no advantage to using beeswax.  Any vegetable oil will do nicely.  

 

For food-safety reasons, the grate should be clean before each use.  (Likewise your cast-iron or any other implements and cookware.)  Bacteria can thrive in detritus.  This is also why I carefully wash and dry the entire grill after each use.  I'm a stickler for "clean," and my grill today looks exactly as it did when I took it out of the box, except that the grates are well-seasoned.

 

(Very occasionally, when I'm cooking something that's messy and drippy, I'll use the grate that came with my old "Smokey Joe," which is the same size.  Just because it's a bit easier to clean sometimes.  But it, too, is clean.)

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21 minutes ago, MikeRobinson said:

I live not far away "the Lodge mother-ship" in South Pittsburg, TN, so I asked them what they use to "pre-season" their cookware at the factory and they told me, "canola oil."  That's it: that's what's on there.  Coat the grates with this, and put them in the (kitchen ...) oven at 400ºF for one hour, just as you would with a piece of cast iron cookware, then let them cool with the oven door closed back down to room temperature.  The seasoning is not on the surface of the metal, but over time is absorbed into it as you continue to use it.

 

Wash off all food residue with, say, a Scotchbrite pad, and a small amount of dish-soap if needed – yes, you can use dish soap – then dry thoroughly with a towel.  Over time a coating will develop that resists food sticking to it, and this coating will not scratch off.  I see no advantage to using beeswax.  Any vegetable oil will do nicely.  

 

For food-safety reasons, the grate should be clean before each use.  (Likewise your cast-iron or any other implements and cookware.)  Bacteria can thrive in detritus.  This is also why I carefully wash and dry the entire grill after each use.  I'm a stickler for "clean," and my grill today looks exactly as it did when I took it out of the box.

 

The factory pieces are seasoned with canola for Lodge.  I think they had vendors in the store showing people that Beeswax could also be used for seasoning.  

 

I don’t see the Beeswax as a necessity for seasoning.  I found it interest the option was on the table. 

 

The concept of using Beeswax for seasoning actually comes from the the Europeans who use Beeswax to season carbon steel pans, woks and for rust protection for carbon steel knifes.  Some grades of carbon steel can be difficult to season.  The Beeswax adheres better to the less porus surface of Carbon Steel. 

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To me, the beeswax would just melt and fall off.  You don't need the oil to "stick to" anything.  Just coat it with oil and do the kitchen-oven thing.  Then, with ordinary use, the seasoning will naturally build.  You can also lightly coat the grids with canola oil once again before putting them on the fire.  (If something was thinking of sticking, this will help prevent it.)  Each morning-after, thoroughly clean and dry them to remove all food residue, then store them in a dry place where air can freely circulate.

 

Inspect for rust and if found, immediately sand it off and re-season.  But, there should never be rust.

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I love cast iron threads!!  You could spend about a month on YouTube watching videos too!!

 

Basically, my pan was seasoned with bacon grease, butter, pork fat, beef fat, olive and avocado oil.  I did nothing to it except grease, cook, scrub, grease, cook, scrub...repeat.

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