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KJTerp

Labor Day Weekend Cooks

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Sound off everyone! What's the plan for this weekend?

 

I'm thinking pizza one night, and trying a smoked chuck roast/poor mans burnt ends for the other.

 

Both of these will be firsts for me. I think I have a pretty good idea on how to do the pizza based one what ive read here, and my experience with the devil hotbox inside the house, but any advice/input on the chuck roast would be appreciated. I've braised plenty, but this will be the first smoked one. I was planning on treating it exactly like brisket, with just a shorter overall cook time.

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Thinking about doing pulled lamb sliders and possibly some Asian stcky ribs.  Might throw in some pizza one night if I can find the time.  Moving my son back to college on Friday so we'll see.  I just did two Chuck roast this past weekend.  Did one smoked until 140 and then into a beef broth braise until around 200.  Then pulled for beef sliders, it was good as normal.  Then the other was done this way:

 

3 lbc chuckroast

3 Tbsps smooth brown mustard (gray poupon)

3 cloves garlic thinly sliced

 

Rub with:

Malcom Reed’s AP beef seasoning


For this recipe I’m shooting for more of a beefy flavor than typical bbq, so the seasoning I use is savory based. I take my AP seasoning (Salt, Pepper, Garlic) and add a few things to it.

1/2 cup Salt
1/4 cup Garlic
1/4 cup Onion Powder
1/4 cup Chili Powder
1/8 cup Black Pepper
1 tea Ground Parsley
1 tea Ground Oregano

 

1. Use a pairing knife to cut slits into the roast, and insert the garlic

2. Brush the top and sides of the roast with the Dijon mustard.

3. Thickly dust the top and sides of the roast with the spice rub.

4. Place the roast directly on the smoker’s rack at 225.

5. Pull the roast out when the internal temp reaches 190.

6. Wrap the roast in a double layer of aluminum foil.

7. Stick the wrapped roast in your kamado and reduce the temp to 200, and leave it in there for an additional 2 hours.

8. Remove the roast from the grill, cut some nice thick juicy slices, and serve with your favorite veggies and/or starches. Enjoy.

 

We refrigerated it and reheated last night in the Sous vide for 2 hours at 145.  It was delicious.

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ooooh that sounds good. I'll file that one away, for the cooler weather, I just can't ever get fired up for meat and taters and veggies on a 90 degree day, but sammies with some pickles and slaw......

 

I was thinking about this for the weekend, mainly so I can make sandwiches for the week, and it gives me an excuse to make coleslaw

 

https://heygrillhey.com/poor-mans-burnt-ends/#wprm-recipe-container-3511

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On 8/29/2018 at 1:26 PM, KJTerp said:

ooooh that sounds good. I'll file that one away, for the cooler weather, I just can't ever get fired up for meat and taters and veggies on a 90 degree day, but sammies with some pickles and slaw......

 

I was thinking about this for the weekend, mainly so I can make sandwiches for the week, and it gives me an excuse to make coleslaw

 

https://heygrillhey.com/poor-mans-burnt-ends/#wprm-recipe-container-3511

I have used exactly that recipe to make burnt “ends” on my old electric smoker, back before I got the kamado. Usually comes out great for me. A few points of feedback:

 

Pay attention to probe tender as well as temp. I’ve done 2 chuck roasts at once before and pulled them at identical temps, yet one is chewy and the other is melt in mouth tender. When I’ve done that, I could tell while probing them that one was going to be a very different texture than the other.

 

Along the same lines, be careful about letting it get too tender bc they can be difficult to cube up...if you get too far along the tenderness scale, the meat will want to melt/shred apart when you take the knife to it. Your preference on texture (i prefer the nearly un-cuttable tender version). Use a sharp knife. 

 

Be be sure to rest the meat before cubing it. First time I did this I skipped that step and groaned when the first cut resulted in a waterfall of gorgeous meat juices flowing onto my cutting board (and therefore, not into my belly). 

 

Watch the sugar content of your bbq sauce for the final step. I’ve used a sweet sauce before, but the recipe calls for you to also add brown sugar to the pan when you have the meat cubes in there. When using a really sweet sauce, it’s just too much for me. Now I either intentionally use a more thin/bitter sauce and sweeten it with the recipe’s brown sugar, or I use a sweet thick sauce and cut the brown sugar back. 

 

But even with those lessons learned, every time I’ve made this it has been like eating meat candy. hard to argue with that. 

 

 

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We're having a few friends over Monday, planning on smoking some beef short ribs. I haven't made them before. I watched John Setzler's video on making them, and I just have to try it out.

 

I'll probably do pizza one day too, it's been a little while.

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Let me start by saying the September challenge will be a seafood challenge. 

 

In the lineup for the weekend, in no particular order, 

 

Rotisserie chicken - probably tonight 

Multiple versions of stuffed peaches 

Detroit style pizza in the WFO - lunch Sunday or Monday 

Some type of seafood cook - see above statement 

Might play with the Konro grill

Possibly pork Pinwheels

 

That's all I have for now but will need to come up with a couple more cooks to round out the weekend. 

 

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Hope everyone had a good labor day weekend, I know I sure did!

 

How'd everyone do?

Weather in the Central MD area looked iffy for most of the week, but luckily we cleared out nicely for some adventures at the KJTerp Household.

 

Sunday, did HeyGrillHey's burnt end recipe, turned out pretty ok, I think I'll tweak it a little going forward, as it wasn't quite as fall apart as I would have liked in every spot, but it wasn't the best piece of chuck either, so i'd call it a win. Big thanks to @dirty6 for his feedback on the recipe, the sammies were spot on with some coleslaw and corn.

 

Monday we loaded up and kicked the tires and lit the fires for my first pizza cook. I used John's low hydration recipe, both the quick and the overnight, as well as Alton Brown's "Last Dough I'll Ever Need" Recipe from his cookbook. I wanted to try a variety of doughs and temps. Had a bit of trouble with Johns dough, since I can't find "instant" yeast here that isn't rapid rise, so I had to wing it a little and use active dry. In the photos, John's dough is the thin pizza's which are a little misshapen, and AB's are the big puffy ones. Stuck with basic plain or mushroom and onion for most of the pizzas, but went wild with one, burnt end bbq sauce onions and cheddar. There wasnt that much left of that one.

 

The only negative on the whole day was this high heat cook seems to have accentuated my firebox ring warp, and I have the dreaded paint peeling Kontrol Tower now, so its WARRANTY TIME. My D/C no longer sits flat on the ring, it has a significant 1" wobble to it. Once food gets down on the grates and everything is loaded it snugs up a little, but it just irks the heck out of me.

 

Thanks again to everyone for all their great info on here.

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24 minutes ago, TKOBBQ said:

Nice looks like you had some good food over the weekend.  The humidity was killer down this way but still managed to get a cook in.  It's in a thread titled All aboard.

 

It was killer up here too. The simple act of walking to the shed, picking out a couple pieces of oak and bringing out the lump had me drenched.

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8 hours ago, KJTerp said:

 

It was killer up here too. The simple act of walking to the shed, picking out a couple pieces of oak and bringing out the lump had me drenched.

 

Stupid me.  Decided to cut the lawn prior to overbody arriving here for dinner.  That was a mistake... i doubt that two showers, let alone one would have been enough...

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10 hours ago, KJTerp said:

How'd everyone do?

We had a very solid outdoor cooking weekend! Four dinners in a row. 

 

Picked up a grill extender to support a big rib cook and some KJ lump from amazon just in time. 

 

Friday night I snagged a $20 prime ribeye for the wife and I to split and a couple $5 filets for the kids to fight over. Reverse seared the whole lot (first attempt at that method). My sous vide looked at the steaks with extreme jealousy as they came off the fire. Also, used the firebox/basket divider for the first time to cut down on thr lump usage. Worked like a charm. 

 

Saturday was a pizza pie night. Wifey made some balsamic carmelized onions to go along with the usual toppings. Ended up putting 8 pies through the KJ. 

 

Sunday was a smoke day, tossed on babyback ribs and did them 3-2-1 style. Fought the fire for quite awhile but it eventually settled and burned well for the last two and a half hours. Got 4 racks onto the KJ Classic, but had to cut them into half-racks to make the Tetris puzzle work. Had room for another 1 maybe 2 half racks. 

 

Monday wasn’t a planned cook, so it needed to be more quick. Picked up a couple 3 lb chickens last minute and spatcocked them. Nothing special. Put them all on the grill extender to try and get them closer to the radiant heat high in the dome. No pics of that one. 

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