Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
John Setzler

Gonna Cure a Fresh Ham

Recommended Posts

I have sourced a high quality whole ham, bone in, skin on.  I plan to prep that ham and then cure it.  I am studying different methods of curing and I believe I want to wet cure it in a brine using the equilibrium method.  

 

@Smokehowze - if you are still around....

 

I am reading Ruhlman's Charcuterie book...  His general working ratio for dry cure is 2 parts salt to 1 part sugar, plus 10% of their combined weight of pink salt.  Pink salt goes in at the rate of 1g per lb of meat.  

 

Does this same formula work for an equilibrium wet cure if you work from the combined weight of the meat and the water?  For instance:

 

10lb ham plus 2 gallons of water (8.3lbs) for 18.3lb total...

 

Pink Salt - 18g 

Salt - 112g 

Sugar -  51g

 

IF those numbers are good, how long would the wet cure need to go?  I plan to inject the ham thoroughly with the brine to speed up the process but if this cure is going to take a month or longer to do, I am gonna have to cure a different way...

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John

 

I am in Japan and do not have my info database handy as it is on computer at home.  Let me pull some data for you -  see below.  .  I may see if my son can access my spreadsheet and get the calculations done. 

 

Key info needed:  What is the weight of the ham and approx max thickness to bone and an average thickness. ? And how much brine solution will take to full immerse it?   And what % salt and sugar do you want?  Those are the critical numbers to calculate the right Cure #1, salt and any sugar.  156 ppm for the cure is a good value. 

 

It may take, even with injection which is a key thing to do, two weeks at least.  You would inject the brine solution which starts out more concentrated and eventually the non brine water in meat and the cure solution both injected and external exchange  with the meat water and each other and attain equilibrium to the final percentages. 

 

Thickness drives the time it takes for the exchange and equilibrium.  That is why injection helps as it is inside out and outside in working together. 

 

You have the right idea on the calculations concept but numbers may be off.  The Digging Dog Farms calculator will get you close.  Just use total meat and water weight in the caculator if doing equilibrium.

 

Here is link

 

https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/threads/universal-cure-calculator.124590/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Smokehowze

 

That calculator doesn't allow me to account for the water.  It's just for an equilibrium dry cure.  

 

For a 10lb ham, it gives me:

 

11g cure

80g salt

45g sugar

 

If I add the weight of 2 gallons of water I get this: (yes.. my nubmers above were off because i onlyh accounted for 1 gallon of water weight)

 

10lb ham plus 16lbs of water (11.8kg / 11800g)

 

29g cure

200g salt

118g sugar

 

If two weeks is adequate that would be fine with me.  I just don't want it to take 4 weeks.  If I inject would you think 2 weeks would be a good guess?  I do not know exactly how big my ham will be yet.   I asked for a smaller ham so I'll just have to wait until it gets here to see what I'll have.  

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you add the water weight to the meat weight that caculator is OK because it reflects the total solution of all the water and the meat and the other additions.  He even says that in his text write up.  It tracks with my personal spreadsheet based on US FSIS meat inspectors calculation handbook.

 

If you inject 10 % by weight of the solution in the meat with a reasonable uniform distribution you can probably get by with 14 days in immersion especially if  it not a huge ham.  It may be tempting to do more but you will end up with soggy meat.    I typically figure  about 10 days per inch ( which seems to a rule of thumb number) with no injection on my pork bellies.  

 

Additional note:  With skin on you need to inject and the cure rate may be slower than 14 days.  Some further internet research may be needed.  Everything I have done has been skin off and just meat or meat with a heavy fat layer on one side. 

 

Temperature matters 38 degrees for typical fridge is about perfect .  Too cold and the cure rate slows way down. 

 

Also you should allow at least a day or day and a half or maybe two in fridge  uncovered out of solution and rinsed for equalization.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, I followed Greg from Ballistic BBQ’s home cured ham method and it worked great. I did a 10 Day equilibrium cure of an 18 pound bone in ham and it was excellent. I did this back in 2016 I think, it was posted here on Kamado Guru. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Mr Cue said:

FWIW, I followed Greg from Ballistic BBQ’s home cured ham method and it worked great. I did a 10 Day equilibrium cure of an 18 pound bone in ham and it was excellent. I did this back in 2016 I think, it was posted here on Kamado Guru. 

 

I watched greg's video but there is absolutely NO explanation as to how he came up with the numbers.  From everything I have read so far, there is absolutely NO WAY you could do an equilibrium cure on a ham of any size in 10 days.  It's physically impossible to do it in that amount of time.  

 

https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/salting-brining-curing-and-injecting/science-curing-meats-safely

 

If this information is true to any extent, you will see what I'm talking about...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On October 6, 2018 at 10:58 AM, John Setzler said:

 

I watched greg's video but there is absolutely NO explanation as to how he came up with the numbers.  From everything I have read so far, there is absolutely NO WAY you could do an equilibrium cure on a ham of any size in 10 days.  It's physically impossible to do it in that amount of time.  

 

https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/salting-brining-curing-and-injecting/science-curing-meats-safely

 

If this information is true to any extent, you will see what I'm talking about...

 

 

I also injected the ham before it went in the brine to soak. It was rosy pink, tasted of ham, and had the ham texture when I cooked it. I agree that I don't think it could cure in 10 days just brining alone. Injection is necessary. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@John SetzlerI'm not sure if this would be of any help to you but I got it off the Smoking meat forum years ago if I remember correctly. 

 

pops-wet-curing-brine
By bmudd14474, Sep 27, 2011 | 20.9K Views | Recipes
real simple curing brine:

for every 1 gallon of water, add:

1/3 - 1 cup sea salt (depending if you're on a lo-salt diet)

1 cup granulated sugar or Splenda®

1 cup brown sugar or Splenda® brown sugar mix

1 tbsp cure no. 1 pink salt

stir thoroughly until clear amber color, pour over meat, inject if necessary to cure from inside-out as well as outside-in

weight down with a partially filled 1 qt or 1 gal. ziploc bag or bags to keep meat immersed

Curing times vary with meat, but generally overnight to 2-3 days for chickens and turkeys, 8-10 days buckboard bacon, 10-14 days belly bacon, pork shoulder, whole butts, 3-4 weeks whole hams, 10-20 days corned beef (fresh beef roasts, briskets, rolled rib roasts, etc.)   If whole muscle is more than 2" thick, then inject so it can cure i/o as well as o/i, and/or in and around bone structures, etc.

You can add any other flavorings you'd like, this is just the basic curing brine. 1 heaping tablespoon of cure is about 1 ounce.  The maximum concentration allowed safely is 3.84 ounces per 1 gallon of brine (24 lbs.per 100 gallons: 16 oz. x 24 = 384 ounces, 1/100th is 3.84 ounces).  You can experiment with different concentrations as long as you keep it between those parameters:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...