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My technique is to prepare the dough from scratch.  I prep my wooden peal by rubbing it with flour and then sprinkling on some very course ground corn meal.  Next I put the dough on the peal before I dress it.  In your case it looks like you could simply pick up the dough since it's rather thick.  My ultra thin pizza requires me to roll it up on a rolling pin to transfer it to the peal, sort of like your grandmother transferred a thin pie crust to her pie pan. 

 

In any event, the idea is to get the dough onto the peal first so that you don't have to worry about getting a fully dressed pizza onto the peal without making dog food.  A "garbage" pizza with lots of sauce and too many toppings is particularly vulnerable to disaster at this point.  But a plain piece of dough is no worries.

 

I dress the pizza on the peal.  When I put it on my very hot pizza stone (I cook at 700 F) I shake the peal a little bit to be sure the pizza is moving and then slip it onto the stone.  The corn meal acts like tiny ball bearings to insure a nice release.  It helps prevent sticking to the stone too. 

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14 minutes ago, Mozella said:

My technique is to prepare the dough from scratch.  I prep my wooden peal by rubbing it with flour and then sprinkling on some very course ground corn meal.  Next I put the dough on the peal before I dress it.  In your case it looks like you could simply pick up the dough since it's rather thick.  My ultra thin pizza requires me to roll it up on a rolling pin to transfer it to the peal, sort of like your grandmother transferred a thin pie crust to her pie pan. 

 

In any event, the idea is to get the dough onto the peal first so that you don't have to worry about getting a fully dressed pizza onto the peal without making dog food.  A "garbage" pizza with lots of sauce and too many toppings is particularly vulnerable to disaster at this point.  But a plain piece of dough is no worries.

 

I dress the pizza on the peal.  When I put it on my very hot pizza stone (I cook at 700 F) I shake the peal a little bit to be sure the pizza is moving and then slip it onto the stone.  The corn meal acts like tiny ball bearings to insure a nice release.  It helps prevent sticking to the stone too. 

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