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saltymason

first cook. complete failure. please help me.

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Inject when raw but be mindful of the total amount of salt you’re introducing to the meat. 

 

And yes, use a larger grain salt. A teaspoon of fine sea salt, by weight, is a fair bit more than the same teaspoon of kosher salt. 

 

https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-ingredients-glossaries/science-salt

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2 hours ago, Chasdev said:

If you cook it right you don't need to inject.

 

Agree.  Stick with salt (kosher) and pepper and do what landscaper said.  You'll still be critical and it may not be perfect but you'll be darn close.  Brisket is tough to master.

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19 hours ago, saltymason said:

 

i've never heard of this. so do i just put the seasoning in a bowl of water? I do have a pretty good injector.

 

Beef stock or even olive oil are good.  I personally like using oil as a carrier with spices, but that's just me.

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My best brisket was at ~215 degrees, just salt and pepper, post oak, no wrap, no injection, fat side down, point towards rear, let it ride overnight and then some. Don't overtrim the fat.

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Try this as a reset.  Use choice grade and not a select grade brisket. Angus works nice if available. Trim fat as desired but don’t remove all fat.  I mainly just remove the hard and knarly fat and tissue matter.   To me the nice fat is a good and delicious part of a brisket.  One can always remove fat off the served slice easily if they don’t prefer to eat it.  Slather meat with yellow mustard.  Just squirt on and use your hand.  You really won’t get a mustard flavored brisket but it adds a nice undertone and helps hold the seasonings on the meat. Moderate to medium sprinkling of Montreal Steak seasoning all over is a simple and fast season approach.  Wrapped in plastic and overnight in fridge. Touch up any seasoning as need when unwrapped for cooking.   However, I  often just slather and season right out of fridge and counter rest for a short time while Kamado is stabilizing if I got lazy the night before.  Cook at about 275 on Kamado temp.  Cook until meat probes tender with thermometer.  That is usually around 203 to 205 internal.  Remove. 

 

If compelled to inject before cooking, .. mix low sodium beef broth with some water and onion and garlic powder.

 

As noted, the butcher paper wrap at the proper time also can help.  I have done them with and without and have used the paper wrap on my last few cooks and liked the results.  It is also nice for absorbing the excess fat.

 

After it is done... 

 

Double foil wrap (over the butcher paper if used) and then overwrap in towel until serving.

 

Only cut slices for needed for  immediate serving.  Wrap back in plastic or the foil until more servings needed.  Brisket will dry out really fast on precut slices that sit around.

 

Leftovers freeze well.  I like to take leftover slices and heat and even brown a bit in pan with cooking spray or a touch of butter.

 

Darn, now I have made myself hungry...

 

 

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6 hours ago, CentralTexBBQ said:

chiming in late but, I wouldn't cut it into 3rds. 

so do everything 1 shot? because in thirds thats already 4 lbs per cut. I kind of get what you mean though. the last cut had a lot of fat on it. I wished it was partitioned differently.

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On 1/17/2019 at 3:32 PM, Chasdev said:

If you cook it right you don't need to inject.

 

This was the goal. but i don't think brisket is a newbie friendly cut. I'm going to work with pork for a while until I figure somethings out and come back to this. if you have links to any videos or reading material, i'll be sure to check it out. for now, i think the next project is pork butt.

 

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On 1/20/2019 at 3:06 AM, saltymason said:

so do everything 1 shot? because in thirds thats already 4 lbs per cut. I kind of get what you mean though. the last cut had a lot of fat on it. I wished it was partitioned differently.

 

   If you're going to cut it,separate the flat from the point. The flat being so much leaner makes it tougher for the beginner to get the point,or decal,to come out right without drying out the flat. Kinda like chicken,I never cook whole chickens. I do breasts and leg quarters,breasts are done at 155 as to where the dark meat needs to go to 175.

   It's all about fat content.

I agree with some others,you dont need to inject once you figure out meat temps. I put coarse salt and coarse pepper,spray it down with some apple juice or Coke or whatever floats your boat every hour or so.

     Wrap when the stall starts and monitor your internal temp,just because it reaches recommended temp doesn't mean it's done.

I've jabbed many a brisket at 205 and it was tough as shoe leather,lower you cooker temp at that point and let it ride till the probe goes in with almost zero resistance.

  It should feel like you're sticking your probe in room temp butter and the brisket should act like jello when shaken.

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6 minutes ago, Tex said:

 

   If you're going to cut it,separate the flat from the point. The flat being so much leaner makes it tougher for the beginner to get the point,or decal,to come out right without drying out the flat. Kinda like chicken,I never cook whole chickens. I do breasts and leg quarters,breasts are done at 155 as to where the dark meat needs to go to 175.

   It's all about fat content.

I agree with some others,you dont need to inject once you figure out meat temps. I put coarse salt and coarse pepper,spray it down with some apple juice or Coke or whatever floats your boat every hour or so.

     Wrap when the stall starts and monitor your internal temp,just because it reaches recommended temp doesn't mean it's done.

I've jabbed many a brisket at 205 and it was tough as shoe leather,lower you cooker temp at that point and let it ride till the probe goes in with almost zero resistance.

  It should feel like you're sticking your probe in room temp butter and the brisket should act like jello when shaken.

 

 

......Oh,about the probing,once you reach what should be your target temp. Do this every ten minutes at the very least.

It can go from tender and juicy to tender and dry and crumbly in no time flat. Especially in the flat.

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