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guillotinemf

Hello from Georgia

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My father-in-law got my wife and I (in other words, me) a Kamado Joe as an early Christmas gift. It's a Big Joe, and I can't wait to see what this bad boy can do. On my first night with it I grilled a couple of ribeyes. I was honestly disappointed that the temperature didn't get above 500 degrees, but I realized too late that I hadn't put enough charcoal in the fire box. Lesson learned. The steaks were still very tasty but they didn't have that beautiful sear I was going for. The baked potatoes I made before I tried cranking the heat up were absolutely perfect, completely done and moist with crispy skins.

 

The next night I butterflied some chicken breasts, rubbed some Worcestershire sauce and stuffed them with cream cheese mixed with green chilis, and wrapped them in bacon. I've never had a juicier chicken breast in my life. I don't know if the moist meat was thanks to the cream cheese and bacon or to the kamado, but either way it was absolutely delicious.

 

Tonight I have some baby backs going. The dome thermometer is reading under 250 so I'm hoping I have a good temp. Santa Claus is going to bring me a good leave-in probe hopefully. 

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Welcome!  You will definitely up your grilling/smoking/cooking game with the KJ.  Plenty of expertise around this forum and everyone's glad to help...I will only help as long as your a Dawg fan though...no yellow jackets here....J/K.

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Welcome to the forum, it sounds like you are off and running with your new Big Joe.  The first cook is always the one you learn the most from.Your FIL got you a great present that you should enjoy for many years.

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@Gayton81 Go Dawgs!!

 

The ribs turned out pretty good. I didn't wrap them in foil or butcher paper this time, but I will probably get some spare ribs and try doing the 3-2-1 method on my next try. A buddy of mine makes BBQ sauce using his granddaddy's old recipe, it's thin and spicy so I mixed it with some honey and it stuck to the ribs really well. 

IMG_7675-1.jpg

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Welcome, Congratulations on your recent wedding.  Glad to have both you and your new Big Joe with us. Quite a gift from your FIL, maybe you should do a PR with all the trimmings for Christmas or New Years to show him the benefits of getting your daughter and SIL a world class kamado. I am sure there are other opinions, but IMO the 3-2-1, foil, water pans and trays, ring of fire, the volcano,  and other popular BBQ techniques were developed for use on less sealed and humid smokers and kettles. The kamado's ceramic cooking environment is quite moist and  In truth, while it will cook all the BBQ classics; a kamado is much more a charcoal fired convection  oven than just a BBQ or smoker. Personally,  I  find the 3-2-1 a bit to long on a kamado,  and do something more like the 2-1-1 at 250 with no foil. Half the fun of kamado cooking is learning how this wonderful cooker works.  I find it a very enjoyable and entertaining journey,  I have been cooking on a kamado for a while now and am still learning new things. I am sure you will as well. Enjoy your new grill and the forum conversation.

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17 hours ago, guillotinemf said:

@Gayton81 Go Dawgs!!

 

The ribs turned out pretty good. I didn't wrap them in foil or butcher paper this time, but I will probably get some spare ribs and try doing the 3-2-1 method on my next try. A buddy of mine makes BBQ sauce using his granddaddy's old recipe, it's thin and spicy so I mixed it with some honey and it stuck to the ribs really well. 

IMG_7675-1.jpg

 

Great looking ribs. It took me three tries before I got ribs that looked that good.

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6 hours ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Welcome, Congratulations on your recent wedding.  Glad to have both you and your new Big Joe with us. Quite a gift from your FIL, maybe you should do a PR with all the trimmings for Christmas or New Years to show him the benefits of getting your daughter and SIL a world class kamado. I am sure there are other opinions, but IMO the 3-2-1, foil, water pans and trays, ring of fire, the volcano,  and other popular BBQ techniques were developed for use on less sealed and humid smokers and kettles. The kamado's ceramic cooking environment is quite moist and  In truth, while it will cook all the BBQ classics; a kamado is much more a charcoal fired convection  oven than just a BBQ or smoker. Personally,  I  find the 3-2-1 a bit to long on a kamado,  and do something more like the 2-1-1 at 250 with no foil. Half the fun of kamado cooking is learning how this wonderful cooker works.  I find it a very enjoyable and entertaining journey,  I have been cooking on a kamado for a while now and am still learning new things. I am sure you will as well. Enjoy your new grill and the forum conversation.

 

Thanks for the feedback on the rib techniques, I will have to look into the 2-1-1 method and try that. I redeemed myself for my ribeyes I cooked the other day and seared the crap out of a T-bone tonight. I put ghee, kosher salt, pepper, and a little cayenne like I've seen John Setsler do in some videos then put it on the 750 degree grill. Topped it with some butter after it came off the grill. It was absolutely delicious. I plan on attempting a PR on Christmas Day to thank my FIL for the awesome gift. Any tips on PR? I've seen some people recommend putting it on a really hot grill then choking out the fire, and I've seen some people say to cook it low for a longer time. Which way gives the best crust?

IMG_7691-1.jpg

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John  said this roast is 6 lbs and took about 3 hours at 250ish. That sounds about right from my experience cooking PR's each Christmas.  He estimates your 9 lber will take about 30 or so minutes more. Bigger roasts are generally longer not thicker. 

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Did my first ever brisket yesterday. Considering it was my first attempt, overall I was satisfied. Definitely a learning experience. I overcooked it slightly, the flat was a little drier than it needed to be. It was a 15 lb brisket before trimming, and I cooked it fat cap down for 12 hours. As I stated earlier in the thread, I don't have a reliable meat probe yet, so I was basically cooking blind. I wrapped it in butcher paper at the 8 hour mark, which seems pretty late in the cook based on what I've read online, but it had not formed a satisfactory bark by the 6 hour mark. Anybody got tips on getting that pretty bark to form? I had it right around 250 degrees the entire time. I was proud of myself for keeping the temp so well, but I was surprised to see how little it had crusted up in 6 hours. It was tasty though, especially the fatty parts!

IMG_7724.JPG

IMG_7726.JPG

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