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Tex

Hello From the Great State of Texas

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  Hey Y'all!!

Welp I gone and did it,just ordered the Classic! 

  A little background....

I've been BBQing for around 33 years,several of those years in competition. I have a Pitts and Spitts stick burner and a Mac II Star General and never really considered a ceramic cooker.

    But after reading up on em I became intrigued by their versatility and their temp holding ability over long cooks.

Looking forward to a new cooking adventure and picking y'alls brains for technics.

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Welcome Tex, glad to have both you and your Joe with us. The KJ Classic is a great kamado and will serve you well. A kamado, in actuality, is really more of a charcoal fired convection oven than it is simply a BBQ or smoker. You can pretty much cook anything in your new kamado that a chef can cook in an oven, from all the BBQ classics through bread, pies, pizza, fancy and traditional kitchen recipes, brazes and anything else that strikes your fancy. Just a simple spatchcock chicken on a kamado is a glorious thing. There is just something about the kamados moist cooking environment that sets it apart from the normal range of grills and smokers. Enjoy your new kamado and the forum conversation as well.. 

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   Yep...

The versatility is what really caught my attention.

The idea of being able to smoke and sear as well as being able to make a pizza intrigued me.

  Looking forward to the challenge of maintaining cook temps which is always interesting on a new rig. 

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5 minutes ago, Tex said:

   Yep...

The versatility is what really caught my attention.

The idea of being able to smoke and sear as well as being able to make a pizza intrigued me.

  Looking forward to the challenge of maintaining cook temps which is always interesting on a new rig. 

It's all about how much air you feed your fire and not the amount of fuel you put into the fire box. I recommend filling your fire box to about 2 inches below where your deflector sits. You don't need to mound, volcano, just put the lump in and flatten it off even on top. Make a depression with your fingers in the center and put one starter cube into the depression. I don't use a torch , electric starter, looft lighter, or anything else that creates a bigger original fire than I want. Let the one cube burn with the dome open for about 5 minutes and then set the bottom vent to say 1 inch and the top vent to about a 1/4. Just close the lid, relax and watch what your kamado does. It will put out white smoke at first as your fire establishes itself. As your fire establishes over the course of 45 min to an hour the smoke color will change to an almost invisible blue grey. Don't put food on when your kamado is putting out white smoke because your food with pick up a harsh acrid smokey tastes. When you see the blue grey smoke and you are at your target temp your ready to cook. The way a kamado works it is easier to gain temp than to loose it. If you do attempt to reduce temp, their is one thing you need to know about. If you starve an established fire and then rapidly open your kamado, the incoming rush of oxygen onto of your smoldering coals could cause a flash up.  Plenty of folks have learned this the hard way and have the hairless arms to prove it. If you are reducing temp or shutting back the vents, don't lift the lid all in one motion. just pick it up an inch or two and let is sit a while. This will safely add oxygen in a more controlled and safe manner. Just spend some time with it. If you don't keep moving the vents around your kamado will eventually settle at a temp. Just watch the process and learn how it works. Happy Cooking. 

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Yep...

Ya want the thin blue smoke. When cooking on my stick burner I always preburn my logs in a fire pit before introducing them to the cooker thus eliminating the creosote taste.

     I figure this is the same but the cure is going to be easier since charcoal is always going to be cleaner than logs.

Watched a bunch of videos on BBQing on the Kamado and was surprised at the smoke ring that was achieved.

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27 minutes ago, retfr8flyr said:

Welcome to the forum! Listen to these guys.

 

 

 Oh I will considering I have zero knowledge when it comes to Kamado cooking.

I have plenty of knowledge when it comes to cooking/BBQing but I'm definitely a neophyte when it comes to using the Kamado.  

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Hey Tex, welcome to the forum.  It sounds like you will fit right in here.  Sounds like you have a heck of a lot of experience, hopefully you will share some of it with us.  Looking forward to hearing more from you.

 

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3 hours ago, BobE said:

Hey Tex, welcome to the forum.  It sounds like you will fit right in here.  Sounds like you have a heck of a lot of experience, hopefully you will share some of it with us.  Looking forward to hearing more from you.

 

 

  I'll give where I can.

But I expect cooking on a Kamado is quite a bit different than what I'm used to.

Sure air flow and and temp theories remain the same but with the heat holding ability of the Kamado it's a bit different.

    Can't wait to play around with this thing!!!

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