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G-A-R-Y

Confused how to use Pizza stone.

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So I have a new Pizza stone for Christmas, I've watched too many videos and now I'm confused.

 

Do I place it on the deflector plates directly or space it out with nuts.  I'm going to cook four Pizzas straight off. 

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I have a Kamado Joe and have always set the x-rack in the upper position. Then set my heat deflectors on top of that. I then place four copper t’s on the deflectors then set my pizza stone on top of that. This accomplished two things, 1) it gets your pizza higher in the dome to help with more radiant heating and 2) it creates an air gap between the pizza stone and the heat deflectors to prevent scorching the bottom of the crust. 

 

Just made three pies last night and they turned out great. Make sure you pre-heat all of these components so they are good and hot before adding the first pizza. Also, make sure you do not have any white smoke coming from the grill. It should be running really hot 550+ degrees and be a clear or thin blue smoke. 

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I have used three setups, for all of them the heat deflectors are set on the racks in in the high position.  I have placed the pizza stone

 

1) right on the deflector

2) on 1" copper spacers above the deflector

3) on top of an extender rack.

 

All made great pizza, the key is letting the pizza stone get heat soaked.  The 1" copper spacers is my current go to with temps 550-600.   I found on the extender rack the pizza cooked too quickly and while the crust was done, the toppings didn't have enough cook time. 

 

The best thing to do is play around with different setups and cook temps.  Depending on your crust you can try everything from 500-750 and get good results. 

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4 hours ago, mslagle said:

I have a Kamado Joe and have always set the x-rack in the upper position. Then set my heat deflectors on top of that. I then place four copper t’s on the deflectors then set my pizza stone on top of that. This accomplished two things, 1) it gets your pizza higher in the dome to help with more radiant heating and 2) it creates an air gap between the pizza stone and the heat deflectors to prevent scorching the bottom of the crust. 

 

Just made three pies last night and they turned out great. Make sure you pre-heat all of these components so they are good and hot before adding the first pizza. Also, make sure you do not have any white smoke coming from the grill. It should be running really hot 550+ degrees and be a clear or thin blue smoke. 

I use this exact same set-up only I use terracotta planter feet instead of copper T’s. It works great.

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Yeah, like the folks are saying above. As high as you can get it with your rack. You want both heat from the stone beneath the pie and reflected down from the dome on top of the pie. Setting one stone on top of the other with some sort of spacer in-between the two stones gives you adequate heat and a little forgiveness so you toast but don't burn the bottom of your crust. You can use almost anything for a spacer that wont burn or give off chemical gas like something galvanized or painted, I use copper elbows, if you want to go high dollar you can buy what they call kiln blocks; which are like kids building blocks but made out of high fired ceramic. Potters use them to separate pieces during the firing process in their kilns. You can buy them on line at any ceramic supply store and they come in all shapes and sizes and heights. A added benefit to cooking pizza is that the heat cleans your fire box to a chalky white.

IMG_0447.thumb.jpg.a12d169d8917682b20f55faa431d58b7.jpg

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Well, I don't know what you call it over the water but here we call it a "balls up". My first attempt was a slight disaster. 

I made fresh dough with yeast and let it prove all day, made home made tomato sauce and grated the Parmesan, it was going to go so well?

It was when I slid my elastic Pizza off the board that that I realised I was on a steep learning curve.  It landed with splat and inverted itself,  I had inadvertently made an inside-out Calzone.  I let it cook and it did taste OK.  As the rest of the family learnt from my mistakes my belly filled and after five they did improve.

 

I couldn't get much above 500f, I don't know why, I had both vents fully open? Perhaps more charcoal was needed.

 

Even though I think it was more fun than cooking a Boston Butt.lol.

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1 hour ago, G-A-R-Y said:

I let it cook and it did taste OK.

First rule of cooking; it's hard to render food inedible! However, getting the dough stuck on the peel is one of those ways; glad things turned out.

Frank

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Sounds pretty normal, and I am betting you will get better and better results with subsequent efforts. Just hang in there and don't let yourself give up, you'l get the hang of it. 

 

There are a couple of ways to provide a smooth transfer of your pie from the surface you make it on to the peel and from the peel to your pizza stone. Some folks sprinkle semolina flour or any flour  on the peel to allow the pizza to slide. The flour lubrication method works well and is good if your are using Neopolitan high temps during your cook. Since I cook my pies at a moderate high  650, the method I prefer is to use a 13" round of baking parchment paper. (you can buy them on Amazon 500 sheets in a lot). The rounds come in different sizes but since I like to make 12" pies the 13" round is perfect for me. You lay the parchment flat on your work surface and sprinkle some bench flour on it. Then you make your pie on top of the parchment. When your ready to transfer just pick up the edge of the parchment and slide the parchment and the pizza on top on to your peel. Then slide the pie with the parchment still under it on to your stone. Let your pie cook for  about 4 minutes  then lift the edge of your pie with your peel and pull out the parchment for the rest of the cook so you crust gets nice and toasty. some folks like wood peels, I like a thin metal peel, some folks use wood to put the pizza on and metal to take it off the stone. I find wood peels to be a bit hard to use and metal easier. Figure out what works for you. 

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On 12/28/2018 at 10:31 AM, keeperovdeflame said:

Since I cook my pies at a moderate high  650, the method I prefer is to use a 13" round of baking parchment paper. (you can buy them on Amazon 500 sheets in a lot). The rounds come in different sizes

 

Thanks, I had no idea they sold these on Amazon, or that they were even available.

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