Jump to content

Charcoal Addict

Extreme Diet Trends

Recommended Posts

It’s hard to go by more than a month without either a friend or colleague trying to sell you on the latest fad diet trend.  

 

The Keto diet has been the big trendy diet plan for the past 16 months.  It’s probably one of the most dangerous and dummest diet trends in recent history.  If you actually followed it the the letter and reduced your card intake to 4%, you wouldn’t have enough dietary fibre in your diet for your disgestive system to function correctly.  

 

Sometimes you just feel like giving people a polite smack on the back of the head for all of these crazy diet plans.  Where a little moderation and some increased exercise would yield similar results overtime, too many people want the quickest solution without ever doing their homework.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know anything about the Keto diet, but just like the Atkins diet years ago it will fade away as another takes its place.

Eating well is a lifetime thing. Everything in moderation with exercise included is the healthy way to live your life. No short term diet will suffice for a life long of just eating right and exercise. 

 

When most stray from the diet, and they eventually will....your right back to where you started from. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it is a "right now, the easy way world".

 

I have lost 27# since June on a modified Keto diet.  I ran my modified plan through my M.D. at my annual physical. He had no issues. My test results were all great and bettered previous test history.

 

When someone asks me what my secret is, I say "don't eat Nachos and drink beer, then go to bed".;-)

 

I was exposed to a co-worker who was 100% Keto. I had never heard of it.  He did tell me to read up as much as I could on Keto dieting. He explained it needed to be fully understood if I chose to be 100% immersed in it.

I supplemented this with info I gleaned from us at KG under Healthy Lifestyles-to get to my no name, personalized and modified Keto plan.

 

So in Jan 2020 or before. I will be glad  to offer up any detrimental or positive findings I have along the way.

 

M.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally think that most people do well with Keto, since it simply forces them to pay attention to what they are eating, but that's me.

 

One of the things that really turns me off from keto though was this study:

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-45195474

 

While it's not a direct study of long term keto, it passes my personal "does it make sense?" criteria. 

 

End of the day though, do what you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Keto diet was scientifically designed in the early 1900s for people with neurological disorders, like epilepsy, as an alternative to unproven and often dangerous drugs. There are a number of people doing the Keto diet with much success and enjoying a healthy life; it’s kind of ignorant to berate anyone who is trying to better themselves and get into shape. I challenge you, OP, to try the Keto diet, I bet it’s harder than you think. There isn’t much more I can say and remain polite so, before you start calling people stupid, take a look in the mirror, or browse through some of your old posts.... lots of stupidity there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mr Cue said:

The Keto diet was scientifically designed in the early 1900s for people with neurological disorders, like epilepsy, as an alternative to unproven and often dangerous drugs. There are a number of people doing the Keto diet with much success and enjoying a healthy life; it’s kind of ignorant to berate anyone who is trying to better themselves and get into shape. I challenge you, OP, to try the Keto diet, I bet it’s harder than you think. There isn’t much more I can say and remain polite so, before you start calling people stupid, take a look in the mirror, or browse through some of your old posts.... lots of stupidity there. 

 

I’m not berratng anyone for being on any kind of diet.  Looking after your health is important.  I’m simply making a point that people should be consulting a physician to see what diet plan will work best for them.  

 

I’m politely criticizing people who try to pressure their friends and co-workers into following diet plans, fads or tends without considering what makes sense that individuals specific health needs. 

 

There’s people with pre-existing conditions or slow metabolism who should not be doing Keto.  It’s not good for their health.  

 

You shouldn’t be letting peers pressure you into a diet plan or jump on every diet fad, it best to seek out a medical opinion.  

 

There’s a long list of people trying to sue Atkins for bad advice dispensed to family members that eventually impacted people’s health.  It pays to see a doctor when planning out a diet.   

 

PS: I’m not talking about the doctor recommended version of Keto which reduces carb intake to 10-12%.

 

I’m talking about the very extreme Hollywood remix of Keto that has people dropping grain consumption to less than 4%, in some cases 0% to maximize weight loss as quick as possible without considering potential serious health impact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been on  modified low carb/high fat and veggie diet for around 3 years now.   Key is to make a life style change and not go on some fast paced fad diet.

My doctor encouraged me to cut carbs out of my diet, my lipid panel is fantastic (HDL 89), I'm happy.  I avoid most grain as I can.

 

People need to have a good understanding of what they are getting in to.  Regarding carbs and fiber consider this.  One cup of avocado has 21g of fat and 12g of carbs but 10 of those are fiber.  When you calculate carbs you use "net carbs" so total carbs minus fiber.  Don't eat Wonder Bread or french fries because there is no fiber there.  You quickly have a diet much healthier than the typical American diet by far.

 

I agree, consult your doctor and educate yourself.  If people ask I'll share but other than that I keep it to myself.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the issues with diets in general and exercise programs in general, is they are much easier to maintain when first viewed as a lifestyle change as mentioned above AND having a spouse (or someone) committed to the same program. I lost 30lbs a few years back on a modified keto plus carefully managing the several times of day that I was required to eat. While it was fun treating myself on Sunday's to a full Longhorn Outlaw Ribeye meal and taking up the next morning to find I had still somehow lost a pound and a half, eventually, the work load was just too much to maintain. Had my wife participated in it with me, I probably would still be eating the same way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, philpom said:

I've been on  modified low carb/high fat and veggie diet for around 3 years now.   Key is to make a life style change and not go on some fast paced fad diet.

My doctor encouraged me to cut carbs out of my diet, my lipid panel is fantastic (HDL 89), I'm happy.  I avoid most grain as I can.

 

People need to have a good understanding of what they are getting in to.  Regarding carbs and fiber consider this.  One cup of avocado has 21g of fat and 12g of carbs but 10 of those are fiber.  When you calculate carbs you use "net carbs" so total carbs minus fiber.  Don't eat Wonder Bread or french fries because there is no fiber there.  You quickly have a diet much healthier than the typical American diet by far.

 

I agree, consult your doctor and educate yourself.  If people ask I'll share but other than that I keep it to myself.  

 

Portions are a big issue too.  American & Canadians have daily consumption that’s nearly double the calorie count of your average European.

 

The average Canadian/American grocery store has 3-4 lanes full of different kinds junk food.  In a German or Dutch Grocery stores, you be hard pressed to find more than 3-4 sections with junk food.  

 

I always get a good laugh at those Nurtisystem for Men commercials, “You eat the food; you loose the weight non-sense.”  

 

You’re not going to accomplish much on Nutrisystem without a healthy excercise routine. 

 

Bran, Steel Cuts Oats, Almonds Brown Rice, Kamut, Farro, & Walnuts are good fibre alternatives if you’re trying to avoid bad carbs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Charcoal Addict said:

 

Portions are a big issue too.  American & Canadians have daily consumption that’s nearly double the calorie count of your average European.

 

The average Canadian/American grocery store has 3-4 lanes full of different kinds junk food.  In a German or Dutch Grocery stores, you be hard pressed to find more than 3-4 sections with junk food.  

 

I always get a good laugh at those Nurtisystem for Men commercials, “You eat the food; you loose the weight non-sense.”  

 

You’re not going to accomplish much on Nutrisystem without a healthy excercise routine. 

 

Bran, Steel Cuts Oats, Almonds Brown Rice, Kamut, Farro, & Walnuts are good fibre alternatives if you’re trying to avoid bad carbs.

 

Programs like Nutrisystem work  (at least temporarily) for many people because if you stick to the program rigidly one is eating fixed portions of known caloric amounts. Reducing caloric intake is key to any attempt to lose weight. The vast majority of people cannot exercise their way out of obesity.

Certainly exercise is important for all people and folks who are obese will derive great benefit form increased movement (even if their calorie burn is not substantial), however, if one is obese due to overeating most folks are not going to have enough free hours in the day for exercise to have any significant impact on loosing weight.

This has been known for some time but far too many people still seem to think that just walking around the block after dinner will burn off that ice cream they had for dessert.

A recent article talks about this: https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/04/health/diet-exercise-weight-loss/index.html?sr=twCNN010419diet-exercise-weight-loss0600PMVODtop

 

Very low carb diets may have drawbacks for many people but to say they are necessarily harmful is wrong. Many cultures, such as the Inuit, eat an essentially zero carb diet most months of the year. They have successfully done so for many thousands of years.

 

The average US citizen does consume more than folks in most other countries but to say consume double the amount of an average European is just not what the data shows.

 

In any case, their are many ways to approach what a person should eat and some diets may work better than others for some folks. One just has to find an approach/plan that they can sustain in the long run.

 

Personally, I agree with Michael Pollan - “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

 

Screen Shot 2019-01-08 at 2.29.52 AM.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People don't realize how many calories they take in in a single day. Start actually weighing what you eat at every meal and count the calories. Most would be surprised at the amount they OVER eat. By the time the day is over most have consumed 1.5 to 2 times what the normal recommended allowance of calories. 

 

Like Heavy G said. Nutrisystem works because the calories are counted for you. You can do the same yourself and save the money. 

 

Calories in .....Calories out. 

 

Its really easy to get fat. I know from experience. :-D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its more about eating real food if your food has a long shelf life dont eat it . 

These big companies dont care they put chemicals and harmful crap in the food to make us fat especially msg 

 

So bottom line eat real food and exercise that is key

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, HeavyG said:

This has been known for some time but far too many people still seem to think that just walking around the block after dinner will burn off that ice cream they had for dessert.

A recent article talks about this: https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/04/health/diet-exercise-weight-loss/index.html?sr=twCNN010419diet-exercise-weight-loss0600PMVODtop

 

Spot on. The school of "hard knocks" taught me this lesson. The graphics in the article reinforce what any weight loss person has to be fully aware of. I protect the calories lost through exercise dearly-sometimes they keep me in the calorie deficit column needed for the day.

 

My wife avoids exercise as a planned activity.  She finds ways through daily activities to burn extra calories. I.e. taking the stairs, parking far out in the parking lot, etc. This is working for her physical make up. Hey,  when we are together during the day I piggyback on her methods.;-)

 

M.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to stick to a diet plan you can commit to for the long term.  Keto is pretty strict, too many people jumping the Keto bandwagon don’t last because of how restrictive it is. 

 

A lot of people end up yo-yo dieting because they pick plans they can’t sustain in the long run.  

 

If you pick a diet plan that makes you feel miserable, it’s the wrong plan.  You won’t last.  

 

I have no trouble with cutting down bread consumption.  I like Kamut and Farro.  You can’t have those on the Keto diet.  I’d rather stick with healthy lower average calorie diet vs a Keto plan where you can’t have anything grain based including some things that are good for your health in moderation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×