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RevNayte

Welcome...me?

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New to Kamados, been cooking a long time and BBQing and grilling a long time too. Used a friend's medium BGE a couple months ago and it blew me away. Used the money Santa gave me to buy a Kamado Joe Classic (not the classic II, but new enough to have the multi-piece firebox) at a great discount. Moved it in last night. Planning my next several cooks.

 

I live in Houston, hunt deer in South Texas, and really like a variety of multicultural food things. My mother is Indian, so the idea of getting a piece of equipment that I could smoke a brisket on one day, set up as a tandoori oven the next, and use the leftovers from both to make a pizza with was just too cool to pass up. 

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Hey Rev, glad to have you and your new Joe with us. KJ makes some fine grills so you made a great choice. I cook on a large BGE, mostly because their is a dealership just down the hill. I think you have the right idea about kamado cooking. A kamado is actually more of a charcoal fired convection oven than just a BBQ or Smoker. You can cook all the BBQ classics, plus breads, pies, pizza and detailed kitchen recipes. You new Joe is a very versatile cooker. For a first cook, I always recommend a whole small spatchcocked chicken. Just something about kamado chicken that instantly tells you, that your money to purchase a kamado was well spent. I will always remember my wife's comments after her first bite from   my first Kamado chicken cook, "Dude, you cooked this........... really ?" About 375 is IMO the optimum temp for a whole chicken cook. A paste of Simon and Garfunkel herbs, coarse sea salt,  ground pepper, orange zest,  and good olive oil rubbed under the lifted skin on the breast, thighs and legs is very nice and wont burn during the cook.  When I do a spatchcock chicken I let the temp climb to 425 right at the end of my cook and throw a few rosemary springs on the fire for a delicate finishing aromatic perfume. Use a probe and pull the chicken at and IT of 165 in the breast. That's about all there is to it.  Happy Cooking. 

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1 minute ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Hey Rev, glad to have you and your new Joe with us. KJ makes some fine grills so you made a great choice. I cook on a large BGE, mostly because their is a dealership just down the hill. I think you have the right idea about kamado cooking. A kamado is actually more of a charcoal fired convection oven than just a BBQ or Smoker. You can cook all the BBQ classics, plus breads, pies, pizza and detailed kitchen recipes. You new Joe is a very versatile cooker. For a first cook, I always recommend a whole small spatchcocked chicken. Just something about kamado chicken that instantly tells you, that your money to purchase a kamado was well spent. About 375 is IMO the optimum temp for a whole chicken cook. When I do a spatchcock chicken I let the temp climb to 425 right at the end of my cook and throw a few rosemary springs on the fire for a delicate finishing aromatic perfume. Use a probe in the breast and pull the chicken at 165 in the breast. That's about all there is to it.  

I'm actually planning to do a couple chickens and some venison sausage Friday! Do you do your birds direct or indirect for this recipe? 

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Indirect, above a deflector and a drip pan (set the deflector on a rack beneath the main grate) . If you need to set your drip pan directly on top of your deflector stone, use 3 or 4  3/4 inch copper elbows on the stone with the pan sitting on top of the elbows so there is an air space underneath. (this keeps the contents of your drip pan from burning). If you don't mind comfort food with a little fat, you can use a cast-iron pan for a drip pan and fill it with onions, carrots, celery, orange wedges, and potatoes, and some chicken broth and let the chicken drip into that for main dish and sides all in one. Have fun. Ps. I find the chicken cooks more evenly with the legs pointing to the back. I cook chicken with and without a drip pan, of the two, with the pan is neater and docent splatter as much grease inside your kamado.  Also, you can use the drips in a pan as stated or to make gravy. 

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Welcome aboard! My first cook was a 10 pound bone in pork butt. I recommend it as it shows you how to control and hold temps for hours on end. I did "burn off" for several hours first to get an idea of what I was in for. My advice is to start shutting down the vents prior to hitting your target temp. It is much easier to give them a little bump open to increase temp than to run away(get to hot) for hours.

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Welcome to the forum, it sounds like you will fit right in here.  Would love to see/read about your tandoor cooking.  I started with a shuttlecocked chicken because it's relatively quick and very forgiving when it comes to time and temperature.

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