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nikon5400

Lump charcoal VS Weber Hardwood Charcoal Briquettes

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Why is lump is preferred to briquettes? 

I understand issues with briquettes with lighter fluid added. But what about the ones that don't? 

 

Briquettes are cheaper and sometimes much cheaper, that's why I'm asking.

Also, are there lump charcoal with fruit flavors, like cherry or apple? I've been using royal oak mostly adding fruit chips/chunks.

Thanks

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Have you seen the sale that popped up at Home Depot on the Weber briqs? They were $3.90 for a 20lb bag. I picked up five bags on Friday and planned on testing them out Friday night so I could buy more on Saturday. That got delayed so I couldn't try them until last night. Made some wings on my Vision grill using a homemade "vortex". The briqs seemed to burn a little hotter than lump did using the same setup. Seemed to be just fine to me. Wish I would have grabbed more because Brickseek shows that the stores in my area are out now. 

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For a kamado user, a major benefit of lump charcoal is the ability to snuff it out by eliminating airflow and then relighting it for the next cook.  You can't do that with briquettes because they are loaded with fillers so there isn't much left to burn if you attempt to relight them.

 

Additionally, because it doesn't have fillers, lump–

  • Tends to burn hotter
  • Produces better smoke flavoring
  • Makes less ash 

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Moved this thread to the general kamado cooking discussion section since that's really what the question is and doesn't specifically relate to vision grills. 

 

As stated the amount of ash and the fact it's harder to reuse briquettes is the main reason why people don't use briquettes in a kamado more often. Also the added ash can cause problems with air flow especially when your kamado has a plate with holes instead of a lump basket.

 

Lump is cheap enough and it works good. 

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I prefer lump as it burns hotter and has less ash, but my father had no problem with briquettes for close to 50 years in his Imperial Kamado.  When the Home Depot puts Kingsford on sale for half price, I have no problem buying it either.  I primarily use it in my other grills, but if I run out of lump it goes in the kamado too.

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On 1/13/2019 at 12:45 PM, pmillen said:

For a kamado user, a major benefit of lump charcoal is the ability to snuff it out by eliminating airflow and then relighting it for the next cook.  You can't do that with briquettes because they are loaded with fillers so there isn't much left to burn if you attempt to relight them.

 

Additionally, because it doesn't have fillers, lump–

  • Tends to burn hotter
  • Produces better smoke flavoring
  • Makes less ash 

 

 

I use Kingsford competition briquettes for steaks and burgers on a mini-webber and I can assure you that the leftovers are very much re-usable, I save and reuse them mixed 50/50 with new briquettes every burger cook.

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Like others stated, briquettes produces more ash than lump and does not burn as hot as lump. 

I have used it, from time to time, in my three Kamados without issues and have never had a problem

relighting it. It provides a good backup if you run out of lump since it's readably available and fairly inexpensive.

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I have been using this particular brand of briqs lately. I was able to find another sale and I grabbed five more bags. Stuff is just fine for short cooks. It actually does burn about 50 degrees hotter than Western lump according to my dome therm. I have also been able to reuse some. I just throw some  fresh on top and everything is good 

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image.thumb.png.3c72b94b9de8f2eef8359045c9388687.png 

 

I didn’t start cooking, even frying eggs, until well after I retired.  Before that, Marcia would be out on the deck, grilling our steaks with the guys clustered around the grill.  So…I have very little experience.  But as I started to cook, I would question the accuracy of certain generally accepted things. I would ask, “How do you know that searing meat seals moisture in?”  Or, “Why do you think that turning a steak with a fork drains a significant amount of juices?”  Another one– “Who told you that Damascus knife blades are superior?”

 

The answer was always something similar to, “Everyone knows that.  It’s common knowledge.”  Well, in fact, none of these are true.  They’re false, in the same way that the common knowledge, in 15thcentury Europe, that the Earth was flat, was false.

 

To my point…

I was repeating what I had been told when I wrote that post.  I didn’t have any first-hand knowledge of the subject.  Subsequent posters have better information.  Until I perform my own tests—believe their observations, don’t believe what I wrote.

image.png

Edited by pmillen

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I bought 2 bags last week. I just got a chance to try it tonight. I grilled some hamburgers over direct heat. The briquettes started easy. They burned clean with good smoke. I'll get more bags if they are still available.

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On 1/22/2019 at 1:19 PM, cwhuling said:

I remember reading somewhere that the fillers in briquettes may cause harm to the ceramics? 

 

Not the filler, just briquettes like MatchLight which contain petroleum-based lighter fluids. The filler in briquettes is typically corn starch or some other neutral compound. 

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13 hours ago, pmillen said:

They’re false, in the same way that the common knowledge, in 15thcentury Europe, that the Earth was flat, was false.

 

 

There is a group of people (morons) that would disagree with this statement.   The "flat earth society" of which my youngest offspring is a member of.  And yes, he's a moron.

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1 hour ago, BURGER MEISTER said:

 

 

There is a group of people (morons) that would disagree with this statement.   The "flat earth society" of which my youngest offspring is a member of.  And yes, he's a moron.

Big belly  laugh on that one. Be consoled by the fact, that as a retired high school principal, I can attest to the fact that for most, this period in life is just a stage, shorter or longer for some. A lot of  kids will go through a period where they will believe most anything that is dimetrically opposed to what their parents believe. Just an annoying rite of passage:) 

Grace and Peace friend, hopefully this too shall pass.  Happy Cooking

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