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John Setzler

Vintage Cast Iron

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2 hours ago, lunchman said:

I'm not sure Lodge even makes one.

 

Lodge must have dropped production of it but it is back now..

https://shop.lodgemfg.com/product/fish-pan.asp

We purchased one several years ago from the Lodge Factory Outlet store in Tenn.

It's only been used a few times since you need a fairly large heat source. The burners  on 

a double LP camp stove are a little too far apart and a single burner doesn't cover enough area.

It would probably work on a Kamado with a ~25" grate. It is heavy but works great for frying

fish and tater pancakes. Yum!

 

We also have the cornbread divided pan and have used it maybe once. Agree with lunchman

and his wife on it's use. We do have the Corn Ear and Cactus pans. Not sure we ever used them. LOL!

 

Nice job on the restoration John. I'll bet you get a lot of use out of it.

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Found this video on Youtube wrt. restoring cast iron.  I've used products similar to CLR as well as a vinegar bath and

both methods seem to work  - that and a lot of elbow grease, Scoch Brite, steel wool, etc. LOL!

 

 

I do have a Wagner CI skillet that I inherited from my folks. I think it may have been a wedding present for them back in the 1920's.

We still use it today. From what I could find online, CI from those days was thinner and lighter, which this pan is. Lots of good memories

and great meals from this pan. Used it this this AM to fry bacon.

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Thanks for the link and video for the Lodge pan. That's great news.  A few years ago when visiting my brother in Georgia we went to a Lodge Outlet store (I think it was in Georgia, might have been SC), specifically looking for a rectangular casserole like mine.  No dice. 

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When faced with cast iron that isn't of obvious origin you date it using any markings it has and most importantly the "gate Mark".  The gate Mark location and size has changed over time.

 

This is a cowboy bean pot my neighbor gifted me, it Sat in a barn for years full of water.  I had to use power tools to bring it back.  Someone actually accused me of painting it...  Circa 1875.

 

IMG_20190303_201051664.thumb.jpg.a5b4a97f56dcb7c52c9bcd3a9b934314.jpg

 

IMG_20190303_201146202.thumb.jpg.f1131924a624191744a9eff900cf15d6.jpg

 

The last pic shows the gate Mark, that's where the molten iron is poured in and later ground off.

 

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I've never really cooked on cast iron, and yet the cast iron grate on my Akorn is the best grill grate I've ever had. I'm disappointed that us kids had little interest in my mom's cast iron when she and dad were downsizing...we were all about teflon and 'nonstick', little did we know. She used to make cornbread in her skillet all the time. I just didn't know then what magic was in that skillet.

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I wanted to add that my friend Larry (passed now) was the youngest of 13 and grew up in a house that had dirt floors.  You don't hear many stories like that any longer.  That pot has some untold stories behind it for sure.  Love it.  I don't have the original lid but bought a Lodge lid from the original Walton hardware store on the town square in Bentonville, AR.  Fits perfectly.

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That is one neat looking beanpot. I saw the lid and immediatetly thought Lodge, thanks for the clarification. 

 

I was checking out my Old Mountain casserole after reading through this thread last night, wondering about origin.  China. So be it, it serves it's purpose for my grilling needs. Maybe a Lodge rectangular is in my future,  but I've rarely had the need for multiple casserole pans. 

 

Since we're talking about CI, the other pan I make constant use of is the Lodge loaf pan.  Makes great breads and beats the heck out of those cheap aluminum ones that burn the heck out of the loaf. 

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24 minutes ago, K_sqrd said:

 

Probably homage to Corn Bread? Just a guess. Lodge still makes these in two different sizes.

https://shop.lodgemfg.com/prodcat/bakeware.asp

 

 

Yeah, I looked and saw that. Strange that it's been popular enough to hang around so long. I don't like to have single use things that wouldn't be used very much and a real heavy cast iron pan to make corn shaped bread would definitely fit the "not heavily used" and "cumbersome" bill. LOL

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Wow, that pan really brings back memories.  My Grandmother used to make what she called "corn pones" in exactly that type of pan.  I was born in 1948 and remember her making them all through my 1950's childhood. 

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I have a modern corncob pan,, which i use occasionally, even on my KJ. my guess is that the old ones were for making small pieces to take on picnics, in lunchboxes and the like, instead of having a whole pans worth staling away on the counter as you lopped pieces off like a cake

 

 

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IMG_3306.jpg

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We have an old corn pone pan that the previous owners left when we moved into our current house. Just pulled it out, no markings on it but sure looks like a lodge pan. I don't think we've ever used it. Maybe a new project will be underway in a couple weeks...

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3 hours ago, Jack 101 said:

Wow, that pan really brings back memories.  My Grandmother used to make what she called "corn pones" in exactly that type of pan.  I was born in 1948 and remember her making them all through my 1950's childhood. 

 

My parents came to the US and settled in the Midwest.  We never lived or traveled south of Omaha, NE, but here’s how my mother differentiated corn bread and corn pone.

 

It’s not by the shape of the loaves.  It’s by the ingredients.  Civil war soldiers only had cornmeal, water and pork grease.  What they cooked on their camp fires was corn pone.  They didn’t have the additional ingredients for corn bread; milk, eggs and sugar.

 

She was not really an authority on anything so she may have been wrong about this.

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