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desertshore

Help me decide what to do with this beef cut! Thanks :)

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Hi everybody,

I am a kamado quasi-neophyte (I've got a Monolith junior since last August), and after some experience with shorter cooks (chicken; ribs) I wanted to enroll into Brisket Academy. Unfortunately, it seems that I have failed the entry exam, as I couldn't explain to my butcher what I needed.

In the end, I was talked into buying something that definitvely does not look like brisket to me, and I don't know how to cook. It seems something I would braise or boil, but according to the butcher I can cut it into strips and make 'asado'. It is boneless (but has some hard cartilage).

 

Apart for the idea of slicing strips and grilling them (that's not what I wanted), what could I do with this chunk of meat? How would you call it in English?

 

Thank you a lot!

20190301_184220.jpg

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2 hours ago, desertshore said:

Hi everybody,

I am a kamado quasi-neophyte (I've got a Monolith junior since last August), and after some experience with shorter cooks (chicken; ribs) I wanted to enroll into Brisket Academy. Unfortunately, it seems that I have failed the entry exam, as I couldn't explain to my butcher what I needed.

In the end, I was talked into buying something that definitvely does not look like brisket to me, and I don't know how to cook. It seems something I would braise or boil, but according to the butcher I can cut it into strips and make 'asado'. It is boneless (but has some hard cartilage).

 

Apart for the idea of slicing strips and grilling them (that's not what I wanted), what could I do with this chunk of meat? How would you call it in English?

 

Thank you a lot!

20190301_184220.jpg

 

If it wasn’t for what looks like a bone I’d say it’s possible that’s the point end of a brisket but they aren’t cut like that and don’t have a bone between the flat and point. 

 

I’d cook it the same.

Season with sea salt the day before 

put your rub on 1-2 hours before while the grill is warming up 

wood chunks in, then coal for nice smoke throughout the cook 

cook at 270, spray with water after two hours every 30 min or as needed until bark is set ... approx 4-6 hours 

wrap in butcher paper or foil. 

Cook until probe tender (feels like it would if your pen was probing a jar of peanut butter) which can happen anywhere from 189-211

FTC (foil, towel, cooler) min two hours to rest. 

Unwrap, slice and serve. 

Enoy the day, you got this .... whatever this is in that picture lol 

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That looks like maybe it's a plate cut with cartilage. I don't know if it has enough connective tissue to smoke like a brisket. Maybe cook it like plate ribs? Could be interesting.

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26 minutes ago, Chasdev said:

I'm not a fan of salting the day before as salt draws the moisture up to the surface, which seems counterproductive, internal juice wise.

 

 

That's the purpose. Draws out the moisture than some of it dissolves back in with the salt adding flavor and the rest evaporates. Having too much moisture in the meat is why hamburgers can end up like meat balls. Especially if the water is cold when it cooks. Getting rid of some of that concentrates flavors too.

 

To me the desired moisture in meat is the fat not the water. Dry aged beef has lost a ton of it's moisture but tastes amazing.

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Your butcher would be your best source of information in identifying it. Just knowing what end of the cow this comes from gives you a leg up on how to prepare it.

 

The problem on this end is that the US has very definite standards for how to break down a carcass and a labeling. So if a packer is at all involved, all of the cuts are going to be extremely similar in appearance and the only variation would come from smaller farms etc. who may not be following the IMPS/NAMP Numbering System- delineated here: http://www.beefissuesquarterly.com/CMDocs/BeefResearch/PE/BeefCutsGuide.pdf

 

Internationally, there is no global standard for processing that I have seen, especially that would be adhered to be small, neighborhood markets,

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11 hours ago, desertshore said:

... Apart for the idea of slicing strips and grilling them (that's not what I wanted), what could I do with this chunk of meat? ...

I think you're over thinking this. 

 

You can smoke any food. The only question is heat/duration. A short, hot, partial cook is best for tender cuts, such as strip steak. Or you can tenderize tough cuts by cooking it past well-done, and holding it there. Your cut looks the latter, so plan a low-n-slow cook. 

 

Seasoning and rubs can vary. I recommend you start simple and try the "special dust" in subsequent cooks. A good starting point is simple salt and pepper, applied copiously, and a day or more ahead so the salt is absorbed. Most of the S&P will fall off when you put it on, or drip off as the meat cooks. 

 

This time last night, I was 90 minutes into a 6 lb. brisket flat cook at 225F target temp. I wrapped it loosely in foil at 7 1/2 hours and 165-170F internal. A couple hours later, it hit 195F and I killed the fire and went back to sleep. As the grill cooled, the meat finished above 200F, then rested for several hours in the hot Kamado. Coolers are popular resting places, too. 

 

It took over 12 hours from the start until the rested meat had cooled to 180F. I pulled it at 140F, about 15 hours total. 14-16 lb. briskets take about 24 hours. This cut looks like 20 lb so give yourself time.

 

You should see three phases.

1) smoke - up to 165-170F, bare food soaking up flavor

2) render - 165F to 205F, wrapped food breaking down connective tissue

3) rest - 205F to 180F (minimum), 140F (preferred), wrapped food reabsorbing fluids

 

Keep temperatures low (225-235F) and let it rest as long as it took to render and you will be pleased. 

 

Have fun,

Frank

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