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    • By DerHusker
      I love Tacos al pastor but have never made them myself. They are a popular street food here in SoCal and Mexico and I finally decided to try my hand at making some. Forgive me as this is a long one.


      I started out by thawing a Pork Butt I had in the freezer that I had purchased on sale for $.99 a lb. (7.93 lbs.)



      I unwrapped it and found there was still some ice crystals on it. (which is what I was hoping for to make cutting it easier)



      I cut it in half and deboned the other half.



      I proceeded to cut it all up into approximately 3/8” slices.



      I placed this into a large container, covered it and placed it into the fridge. I now gathered up the ingredients for the al pastor marinade.



      Here’s the recipe I used. (It’s a combination of several recipes I watched on YouTube) Not shown in the picture are the pineapple juice and the vinegar.

      8 lb bone-in pork shoulder (deboned)

      4 tablespoons achiote paste (I used 1 – 3.5 oz. brick)

      2 guajillo peppers (seeded and re-hydrated)

      2 ancho peppers (seeded and re-hydrated)

      3 Chipotle peppers + all the adobo sauce from 1 - 7 oz. can

      5 garlic cloves

      ¼ small white or yellow onion

      1 oz. Piloncillo (substitute brown sugar if you can find it)

      1 tbsp. dried oregano (preferably Mexican)

      1 tbsp. cumin                                                                            

      1 tbsp. salt

      1 tbsp. pepper

      1 tsp. cinnamon (preferably Mexican)

      1 tsp, cloves

      ½ cup pineapple juice

      ½ cup white vinegar

      ¼ cup OO

      ¼ cup of the water from re-hydrating the peppers

      ¼ cup orange juice

      ¼ cup lime juice

      1 pineapple, skinned and sliced into 1-inch (2 cm) rounds (for the spit/trompo)

      (Note: I only had some small guajillo chiles so I used 6 of them)


       
      Everybody went into the pool for a spin.



      I poured some marinade into the bottom of a very large bowl and then some pork slices.



      I repeated this process until all the pork was in the bowl and pour the rest of the marinade over the top. I then stirred it until everything had a nice coating.



      Now how will I cook this? Tacos al pastor is a dish developed in central Mexico that is based on shawarma spit grilled meat brought by Lebanese immigrants. It is traditionally cooked on a vertical spit known as a trompo. I don’t have such an exotic grill, so I had to improvise. I had found this indoor grill plate at a local thrift store for $2.17



      and used it to create a vertical spit.



      I now peeled and sliced up the pineapple



      And started my vertical trompo stack adding a slice of pineapple and red onion after every 6 or 7 layers of meat.




       



       


      I place the stack in the center of my weber redhead with coals all around it.



      I then setup my craving station.



      Here it is after approximately 30 minutes.



      After approximately 75 minutes I removed the trompo and craved off the outer charred layer. (The char is an important part of the taste profile)



      I then placed the trompo back in the redhead to char the outside again.



      So pretty!



      I then repeated the process another 3 times.




       


      After I had trimmed off the outside 3 times I set up my taco cart errrr bar



      and started to assemble my street taco plate.



      Oh Yum!



      Here it is served up with a Modelo Especial.




       


      This was a little on the spicy side but oh so delicious!         



      Thanks for looking.

    • By DerHusker
      The same day I cooked my Ribeye

      I also grilled up some chicken thighs for my wife and sister in-law.
      I had purchased a 1.5 cubic foot bag of almond wood. I pulled out 5 nice looking pieces to make the fire with.

      I lit up a small chimney of smallish lump pieces and dumped this into my fire pit to start up the almond logs.

      I then placed the almond logs on top and waited for them to start burning.

      While I was waiting I seasoned up some chicken thighs

      and some asparagus spears.

      I placed the potatoes on first. Then the asparagus over the fire for a while to give them a little head start. I then moved them back into the foil tray to finish up and placed on the thighs.

      Flipping the thighs every 3 to 4 minutes until they were at 160 it.

      No plated shots as I was eating the steak.
       
      Thanks for looking.
    • By DerHusker
      So one of my local markets had Rib Roasts on sale. I decided pick one up and cut some Ribeye Steaks off it.

      I unwrapped it and cut the twine holding on the bones

      and removed them.

      I cut 3 2” steaks and the end piece ended up at approximately 1.5”. (I chose the second one from the right to cook)

      I seasoned it with some Primo Chicago Stockyard Dry Rub. I wrapped this in plastic wrap and let it rest for 4 hours.

      I had made a fire using some almond wood in our fire pit. After it was nice and hot I placed the steak over the flames.

      After approximately 1.5 minutes I flipped it.

      After another 1.5 minutes I moved over to the other side of the grill an let it come up to an IT of 130 degrees. I then brought it inside and let it rest on the counter for 8 minutes.

      I then sliced it in half.

      I then sliced it into approximately 3/8” slices and plated it up with some asparagus, a baked potato and a Stone Coffee Milk Stout.

      It was delicious.
       
      Thanks for looking.
    • By DerHusker
      I had a bunch of fries’ leftover from eating at a local burger place that I had saved so I decided to make a popular burrito here in San Diego. It is known as a California Burrito and typically has Carne Asada, French Fries, Frijoles, Cheese, Pico de Gallo, Guacamole, and Mexican Creama. (A 7-layer burrito if you want) Any way I started out making everything and was taking plenty of pics with my phone camera but somewhere in the middle of my cook I somehow (and I have no idea how) set my phone back to “Default” mode. Anyway, I don’t have access to those pics as of now and may never have access to them as they may end up being erased. So, I whipped out my Canon 70S and took the following pics at the end of the cook. I had purchased some Carne Asada and flour tortillas from the Mercado. I made up a bowl of Pico, A bowl of guacamole and some Mexican Rice. (No Pics) I then grilled up the Carne Asada. Here it is on the grill.

      I brought this in and diced it up into small squares.

       

       

       
      I then started to assemble the burrito. Started out with a nice layer of Mexican Cheese. Then the Carne Asada, Fries and some Pinquito beans.

      Then some Pico de Gallo, guacamole and some Mexican Creama.

      I rolled it up and placed it on the grill.

      Here it is done and ready to cut.

      And here are the plated shots with some spicy carrots, Mexican rice and a Modelo Negra.

       

      And a close-up shot.

      This was delicious!
       
      Thanks for looking.
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