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Beermachine

I sold my Classic Joe I today

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Well, I sold my Kamado Joe Classic I today. I recently bought a Kamado Joe Classic II for $600 cash. I paid $999 plus tax for the Classic I in 2015. I decided that I was not using both of the classics enough and that the older one needed to find a new home. I put it up on FB marketplace for $450 and had many people bite.

 

The first was Barbara and we set up a time for 2pm this afternoon here in Northern NJ. Barbara showed up right on time. She got out of the car and handed me a card that said "I am deaf, all of our communication will require you to write your answers down in my book". So, it began. Barbara is a lovely lady. She was born before WW2 and was struggling to lift the lid of the Kamado Joe Classic I. I had to shadow her so that she did not drop it and break the grill dome.

 

After about 300 written questions in her book and 300 written responses from me, she finally decided she'd like to buy my grill. My 17 year old son was standing by me the entire time. Barbara decided that she wanted to negotiate. She offered me $25 less than my asking price. I declined. I showed her 4 other people in my FB feed that were going hard after this grill. She realized that the Kamado Joe jackpot was realized.


Barbara handed me $450.00 and wrote that I should strap the grill to her flimsy old trolley and to place the grill in the back of her CRV. She wrote that she'd slide the grill off the back of the car and then pull it up a dozen steps to its new home...... I wrote to Barbara and advised her that there is no way she could handle this grill on her own and asked if she had anyone that could help her. Her response was that she'd need to hire someone to assist.

 

At this point I realized there is a need to demonstrate the ability to be a decent human being. My son was watching and reading all of our exchanges. I wrote to Barbara and told her that my son and I would drive to her house and install the grill. 1.5 hours later and nearly 50 miles away, we arrive at Barbara's estate. Her enormous house on a few acres of the most prime real estate was on display. Only a select few get to live in such luxury within 10 miles of New York City. Her driveway was a short commute up to the homestead. She gave my son and I multiple written options on how to get this grill to the site of her choosing.

 

My son and I spent the next 45 minutes walking back and forth from the driveway to the new Kamado Joe grill site. Piece by piece this fantastic grill slowly made its way to be ready for assembly.

 

The grill was installed. My son and I then read several pages of Barbara's sous vide cooking instructions and how she thought the new grill would help her reach a new level of cooking.

My son and I promptly left. We thanked Barbara profusely for the pleasure to drive to her house and install her new grill. She told us that she could not afford this grill and that the money her late husband left in 1988 was running out.

 

I think we did our good deed for the year?

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The way you described Barbara is fabulous and it sounds like you taught your son a valuable lesson. You did not have to do what you did and I would argue it wasn't even necessarily the "right" thing to do. It was, however, the kind, generous, and compassionate thing. I've found that being compassionate for the sake of being compassionate is often the reward, so kudos to you and your son. Some of the most valuable lessons I recall as a child involve helping out an elderly next door neighbor and his wife with my father. Perhaps your son will also reflect on this as he grows older?

 

As an aside, I grew up in Orange County, NY and made frequent trips to the city and further North. That area is beautiful this time of year as I recall.

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3 minutes ago, psych said:

The way you described Barbara is fabulous and it sounds like you taught your son a valuable lesson in kindness and generosity. You did not have to do what you did and I would argue it wasn't even necessarily the "right" thing to do. It was, however, the kind, generous, and compassionate thing. I've found that being compassionate for the sake of being compassionate is often the reward, so kudos to you and your son. Some of the most valuable lessons I recall as a child involve helping out an elderly next door neighbor and his wife with my father. Perhaps your son will also reflect on this as he grows older?

 

As an aside, I grew up in Orange County, NY and made frequent trips to the city and further North. That area is beautiful this time of year as I recall.

Thank you. You're right. I was kindness and generosity that ruled the day. Barbara was not very appreciative of what we did, but I don't care. My son saw how human beings interact and how to help each other. That is what I was wanting to get through to him and I think I was successful this time.

 

 

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21 hours ago, Beermachine said:

She told us that she could not afford this grill and that the money her late husband left in 1988 was running out.

 

That was great of you to help her move the KJ and a great lesson for your son. It sounds like she was still trying to negotiate the price, even after your help.

Edited by Golf Griller

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