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keeperovdeflame

Franklin's new book "Franklin Steak"

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Walking through CostCo the other day, I saw a new book by Arron Franklin and Jordan Mackay titled "Franklin Steak" and yes of course I bought one, after all it is written by Arron Freaking Franklin. Once home I spent some time going through the book looking at major sections, techniques, etc. Some of the things I noticed are; 1. He outlines pretty much all the specific steak cuts, giving specific cooking methods and techniques that he has found work best for each cut, 2. He gives an overview of the different beef cattle breeds raising techniques that affect flavor and texture, ie. Angus, Wagyu, grass fed, grain fed, etc, 3. He lists his favorite regional meat purveyors and talks about how to buy steaks, 4.He gives a detailed overview including triming and aging techniques for each specific steak cut, 5. He goes over how to cook a steaks starting with what to cook them on. (He calls kamados "the luxury SUV's of outdoor cooking" and sings their praises, but saying "Kamados are excellent devices for cooking many things, unfortunately, steak is not one of them."  However in reading this section, it does not appear that Aaron is familiar with using a half stone to create a two zone cooking environment, which would seem to overcome most of his steak cooking Kamado issues, IMO. Anyway, part of this section shows him building his own steak grill. (His favorite commercial steak grill is the PK ), 6. He shows his techniques for achieving steak perfection, including which fuel to use for your fire, doneness, seasoning, etc. The book ends with a section on sides and sauces and dressings. All in all it looks like an interesting book that contains some useful information. Later on I plan to do a cook illustrating some of his techniques. 

 

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4 minutes ago, WoodyT said:

I ordered both the Steak and his Barbcue Book from Amazon .

Interesting Reading in both and I plan to try some of his ideas out .

 

Since you live in Texas, I will let you know that the book includes a chart listing all the significant steak farms in Texas. 

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44 minutes ago, WoodyT said:

https://www.pkgrills.com/the-new-silver-pk360-grill-smoker-with-teak-shelf-kit/

 

His is an older version of this Grill that is pictured in the Book

 

Thanks.  I'm familiar with the PKs, but not the older vintages.  I thought that the 6 might be a commercial version and not for consumer use.

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1 minute ago, King19 said:

Yeah he also doesn't promote the reverse sear

 

he is dead wrong on kamados

 

i have an aggie buddy that owns a cattle ranch here in TX Bluebonnet Beef. I will ask him how thoughts on the beef section

 

 

 

Thanks. You saved me from purchasing this book. I've tried standard and reverse sear on thick steaks, like a tomahawk ribeye. I don't see how you can not appreciate the difference. Also, my BEST steaks have come off my kamado joe. 

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22 hours ago, King19 said:

Yeah he also doesn't promote the reverse sear

 

he is dead wrong on kamados

 

i have an aggie buddy that owns a cattle ranch here in TX Bluebonnet Beef. I will ask him how thoughts on the beef section

 

 

Actually Franklin discusses the reverse sear on page 165.Saying in the Pro column,  "the reverse sear is the most foolproof and practical way to cook a thick steak perfectly and is especially popular in restaurant kitchens. When you cook the interior slowly and methodically, it ends up consistent".  the Cons he lists are in difficulty of setting up your grill, maintaining low temps and the time needed to cook your steak, (not very substantial arguments IMO).  I am thinking a two zone cooking environment with a half stone on a spider under the grate on one side and open coals on the other, would allow one to successfully deal with both issues, apparently he is not aware of that technique.

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1 hour ago, King19 said:

Yeah he also doesn't promote the reverse sear

 

he is dead wrong on kamados

 

i have an aggie buddy that owns a cattle ranch here in TX Bluebonnet Beef. I will ask him how thoughts on the beef section

 

 

GIG EM!

 

LOVE your avatar @King19

 

is that homage to the King Ranch?

 

me and my dad used to run Santa Gertrudis... they were pets more than anything else

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4 hours ago, TexasBlues said:

GIG EM!

 

LOVE your avatar @King19

 

is that homage to the King Ranch?

 

me and my dad used to run Santa Gertrudis... they were pets more than anything else

 

I wish I was kin to those Kings

 

Funny bc that picture is from Franklin's bbq show when he went to the meat science department at ATM

 

 

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5 hours ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Actually Franklin discusses the reverse sear on page 165.Saying in the Pro column,  "the reverse sear is the most foolproof and practical way to cook a thick steak perfectly and is especially popular in restaurant kitchens. When you cook the interior slowly and methodically, it ends up consistent".  the Cons he lists are in difficulty of setting up your grill, maintaining low temps and the time needed to cook your steak, (not very substantial arguments IMO).  am thinking a two zone cooking environment with a half stone on a spider under the grate on one side and open coals on the other, would allow one to successfully deal with both issues.

Like I said he doesn't promote the reverse sear or it would be more than 1 paragraph

 

Clearly he has his own line of grills to promote and doesn't get paid to cook on a kamado

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I really like Aaron Franklin's advice on cooking brisket, so I'd probably like his steak book.  After enjoying brisket at his restaurant, I feel that he is a master of his craft (just brisket though.  His pulled pork and turkey were nothing to write home about, in fact I think my pulled pork is substantially better. ) However, that doesn't mean I think he has mastered a kamado.  His arguments aren't issues for seasoned kamado users.  That being said, I would bet his methods turn out fantastic results..... But I could be wrong.  It could be like his pulled pork. 

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