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Securing Against Theft

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So, I am very much interested in buying a kamado grill since it has such great features and versatility, but I have a few logistical hurdles to clear first, the primary one of which is securing it against theft. I live in a city with a lot of theft from cars, in person (cell phones, wallets, etc.), and even from homes. It's also a city of row homes, which means my house touches the houses of either side and the closest things I have to a yard are a rooftop deck, a parking pad in the back, and a large public park a block away. That's all to say my options for where to house my grill are:

1. Rooftop deck - probably a bad idea

2. Parking pad - better but need a way to secure it so that it cannot "wander off"

 

My tentative plan has been to buy a bike rack that I can bolt into the concrete near the back of the house and then chain the grill to the bike rack through the nest/legs and the lid handle. My questions about this are:

1. How likely do folks think this is to be secure?

2. My parking pad is at a 1/12 slope (just under 5 degrees), which should be fine for storage based on my tipping point estimations, but if anyone has some solid numbers, I'd appreciate input. The specific grill I'm eyeing is the Kamado Joe Classic II.

3. The bike rack I'm looking at is 36" high and 24" wide. Will that fit under the grill cover with the grill?

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Welcome to Kamado Guru, that sounds like a bit of an issue you have.  Kamado are heavy and I'd be more worried about damage than straight theft.  If I was going to lock mine up I would do it with a chain or cable through the lower vent up through the top stack.  Maybe move?

Hoping one of our other members will chime in, go to the introduction section and tell us more.

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I agree with @philpom... thats almost like a breech lock for a pistol and sounds like a great idea...

 

problem is, with chuckleheads like the common thief, if they want something you have and they are NOT able to swipe it, then the typical recourse is to damage/destroy it...

 

I understand that people live where they live for various reasons...

 

maybe hold off on the ceramic in in lieu of a less expensive kettle...?

 

save yourself the expense and aggravation of being burgled or vandalized and wait until you have a more single-family structure that allows you to lay claim to that which is YOURS

 

just my .02

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Is the roof top deck easily accessible for cooking and relaxing. If so that is a great idea. Getting it up there maybe a bit of a pain. If you are worried about a lit coal slipping out the bottom vent you can always get a large grill matt. 

 

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Thanks for the replies so far!

 

I'm hesitant to use the rooftop deck because: 

1. It's technically illegal to have a grill or any significant source of fire up there, although it is pretty much never enforced.

2. The logistics/muscle needed to get the thing up there are significant

3. There's somewhat of a fire risk if a coal were to fall out of the grill or a live ember get taken up by the wind and land on something flamable (like a neighbor's tar roof). To be completely honest, I think this is only really a problem if you're a bit of an idiot in handling your grill and ash disposal, but...

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11 hours ago, philpom said:

Welcome to Kamado Guru, that sounds like a bit of an issue you have.  Kamado are heavy and I'd be more worried about damage than straight theft.  If I was going to lock mine up I would do it with a chain or cable through the lower vent up through the top stack.  Maybe move?

Hoping one of our other members will chime in, go to the introduction section and tell us more.

 

That sounds like a good way to secure the KJ, but you will have to wait until the fire dies out and the grill cools down before putting the chain back in.

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27 minutes ago, Golf Griller said:

 

That sounds like a good way to secure the KJ, but you will have to wait until the fire dies out and the grill cools down before putting the chain back in.

Agreed on both counts

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I only recently picked up my Kamado, and absolutely love it.  I wish I had bought it years ago.  But with that said...

 

My son lives in a 5th floor apartment in Brooklyn, NY, and his place includes a HUGE outdoor patio (about 500 square feet, and private to his apartment). Like you, he is not allowed to have charcoal fires.  He ended up buying an electric smoker (masterbuilt, I think?) and an electric weber grill.  He's done some very good stuff with his electric smoker, and it brings an easy peace-of-mind that  might not come with a charcoal fired setup.

 

If I were in your spot, I think I'd spend a lot of energy worrying about 1) my really expensive grill down on the street, or 2) starting a fire on someone else's house.  My KJC changed my life for the better, but i'm wondering if it's necessarily a good fit for your current lifestyle.

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2 more thoughts:

 

Akorn, Akorn Jr, Primo Oval Jr, 19" KK, 16" KK, and LG Konro grill have all been or are being used on my covered front porch with wooden deck. Haven't lost any sleep over it yet. 

 

Your biggest concern is young punks smashing it for the fun of it. That's where a good homeowners policy comes into play. Not many people rob houses for a few hundred pound grill that'll take some doing to get it out of there. 

 

 

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Baltimore roof decks are about as jealous as I get about housing. I have some friends with amazing spaces and views that are also almost completely private. I grill on my Trex deck (that is not above my house) more or less without worry but I get it.

 

You can install some amazing concrete anchors, but nothing will be "theft proof". Good luck with what you decide!

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