Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi

 

I have just got my rotisserie attachment sorted out for the kamado

 

 As I have not cooked with a rotisserie before I was looking for tips/cooking temperature advice for a whole chicken as a starter so I can get a feel for it. 

 

Also some other cooks that a rotisserie is well suited for.

 

Thanks in advance 

Nigel 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't hep with the kamado rotisserie as mine is for my gas bbq. But i love a leg or shoulder of lamb on the rotisserie.  

 

Picanha is great. I have seen a few videos on pork knuckle and ithink that Will be my next one. 

 

Lamb I generally put  salt, lemon zest, oregano, garlic, pepper and oil.  Overnight is the best for this.  I trend to cook this slow for acouple of hours. Till it's tender and pull apart.

 

Serve with some red onions that have been salted fit half an hour. Drained and mixed with a pinch is sumac and parsley. Lemon cheeks for people too squeeze over if they want. 

 

 Hmmm i think i know what I'm cooking fit Sunday dinner!

20180818_124007.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I got my Jotisserrie for Christmas and its been fantastic!  Every Sunday is rotisserie chicken night.  A few lessons learned that I've encountered over the last few months.

 

  1. Bank the coals and add a drip pan.  For the classic, a small bread loaf pan works but since you have a pit boss maybe a full size loaf pan.
  2. Sugar in your rub can help or hurt.  Too much and you burn, not enough and you may end of up with soggy skin.
  3. Make sure you start low on the fire as its hard to back it down, no different than normal Kamado cooks.
  4. Find a rub you like and find the right temp for the results you like in terms of skin crispiness.
  5. I had the temp too high as a result of an old gasket and the skin was super charred but the skin was amazingly crispy.  That's the balance I think that you're trying to achieve with a spun bird.
  6. Its pretty easy, enjoy and practice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, KJTerp said:

Here is my longform Turkey procedure, which I follow pretty closely for Chicken.

 

And the gravy process:

 

That looks great stangely my pizza stone split in half last weekend so actually I can do the same as you and use half a stone to bank the fire. As long as I have a spell of dry weather this weekend I will give your method a go. This was just what I needed many thanks 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rotisserie chickens on the Kamado are my favorite! My usual go to is about a 4lb bird cooked at 350 for an hour to an hour and 15 minutes. Bank the coals to the bank and use a small drip pan as mentioned above to prevent major flare ups. My favorite rub for this is Plowboys yardbird.

 

Let us know how it goes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BrewBQ said:

My favorite rub for this is Plowboys yardbird.

 

Let us know how it goes!

Unfortunately a lot of the rubs you guys use are not available here in the UK so I either make my own or sometimes look for something similar or based on the same flavour. Unfortunately not seen any plowboys rubs here. 

 

Will post when I do it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have gotten in the habit of thoroughly air drying my chicken overnight before I cook - just on a cooling rack over a cookie sheet in the fridge overnight - it will really help with getting the skin crispy.  

 

Taco's al pastor are great on there too - slice pork thin marinade, and stack on spit.  When done remove the tongs and hold upright to slice the pork down. 

****learned a huge lesson first time doing this as it failed miserably.  Most al pastor marinades call for some pineapple juice.  I had a fresh pineapple, so threw it in the vitamix and made fresh juice thinking it would be even better.  However, the meat all fell off the skewer within the first hour.  Come to find out that fresh pineapple juice contains Bromelain (an enzyme that breaks down meat fibers) and a 24 hour marinade really gave it time to work.  After further research I found out that in the canning process the juice is heated up enough to kill this enzyme.  So if your going to marinate in pineapple juice for more than an hour - always go for canned.  But for short marinades fresh can be used as a tenderizer.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, grill seeker said:

I have gotten in the habit of thoroughly air drying my chicken overnight before I cook - just on a cooling rack over a cookie sheet in the fridge overnight - it will really help with getting the skin crispy.  

 

Taco's al pastor are great on there too - slice pork thin marinade, and stack on spit.  When done remove the tongs and hold upright to slice the pork down. 

****learned a huge lesson first time doing this as it failed miserably.  Most al pastor marinades call for some pineapple juice.  I had a fresh pineapple, so threw it in the vitamix and made fresh juice thinking it would be even better.  However, the meat all fell off the skewer within the first hour.  Come to find out that fresh pineapple juice contains Bromelain (an enzyme that breaks down meat fibers) and a 24 hour marinade really gave it time to work.  After further research I found out that in the canning process the juice is heated up enough to kill this enzyme.  So if your going to marinate in pineapple juice for more than an hour - always go for canned.  But for short marinades fresh can be used as a tenderizer.  

 

Second the overnight (AT LEAST)fridge  air dry. if you salt the bird right before you put it in, even better. just be forewarned, its gonna look WEIRD when it comes out, thats ok. i dont put my other spices on til after this process

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



  • Similar Content

    • By SPORO
      I just ordered a KJ Classic II over the weekend, and I am beyond excited to start learning and cooking on it when it arrives! I have heard that one should do a few "dry runs" where you heat the grill up without any food before cooking on it. When I was looking at different kamado brands in person, one sales rep told me it was necessary to "set" the ceramic or something like that by heating it up to a few hundred degrees for at least 30 minutes before trying to cook anything on it. I'm honestly a bit skeptical of that claim, but I'm also new to this style of grill, and since it's a significant investment, I obviously want to treat it well and take care of it so that I can enjoy cooking with it for years to come. Anyway, sorry for rambling. I'm looking forward to any advice and suggestions on getting my grill set up and cooking once it arrives! Suggestions on what to cook first also welcome! My wife and I were talking about it the other day and were a bit undecided. Thanks in advance!
    • By markoud
      Hi all,
       
      I just recently delved into the world of BBQ with a Primo All - Around and I absolutely love it.
       
      However, I have a question.
       
      It seems that I cannot go below 250F on my kamado. I am not sure what I am doing wrong. I am planning on cooking my first brisket next week and I would like to be able to hold 175F (or around there).
       
      This is how I fire up the grill:
       
      I place some lump charcoal in the basket and light them up with an electric BBQ lighter At 5 minutes, when the initial load is hot I place some more charcoal in the basket (to fill it up) I wait for about another 5-10 minutes for all the coals to heat up and then use a blow dryer to really get them going I close the lid of the kamado and start closing the bottom vent However, my kamado is already heated up way above 175F (which was fine so far because I wanted it around 300F+).  
      From what I have observed the top vent is not doing anything at all for regulating the temperature, which is odd since everything I read so far on controlling the temp says to use the top vent (for micro adjustments). Even when I have the bottom vent fully closed the temp does not drop below 220F. I believe is because the ceramic walls have already absorbed too much heat.
       
      If anyone has the Primo all-around and is able to use it at 175F I would appreciate the advice on how to do it.
       
      Thank you all for your assistance,
       
      Demetris
    • By SPORO
      So, I am very much interested in buying a kamado grill since it has such great features and versatility, but I have a few logistical hurdles to clear first, the primary one of which is securing it against theft. I live in a city with a lot of theft from cars, in person (cell phones, wallets, etc.), and even from homes. It's also a city of row homes, which means my house touches the houses of either side and the closest things I have to a yard are a rooftop deck, a parking pad in the back, and a large public park a block away. That's all to say my options for where to house my grill are:
      1. Rooftop deck - probably a bad idea
      2. Parking pad - better but need a way to secure it so that it cannot "wander off"
       
      My tentative plan has been to buy a bike rack that I can bolt into the concrete near the back of the house and then chain the grill to the bike rack through the nest/legs and the lid handle. My questions about this are:
      1. How likely do folks think this is to be secure?
      2. My parking pad is at a 1/12 slope (just under 5 degrees), which should be fine for storage based on my tipping point estimations, but if anyone has some solid numbers, I'd appreciate input. The specific grill I'm eyeing is the Kamado Joe Classic II.
      3. The bike rack I'm looking at is 36" high and 24" wide. Will that fit under the grill cover with the grill?
    • By wallawu
      I'm throwing my annual Daytona 500 party Sunday and I grabbed 5 racks of baby backs at $2.68/lb.  Boneless ribeye is on sale for $7.98/lb, so I'm planning on trying out the new rotisserie stand I got for Christmas over an easy cinder block pit I'm going to set up with a 7-8 lb rib roast.  Never rotisserie'd anything before, so this could be a disaster.  A few questions for each...
       
      There will be a lot happening at once, so I'd like to get more done during the prep than during and after the cooks.  I'm wondering if cutting the ribs into sections--or even individually as this article suggests https://www.smoking-meat.com/august-13-2015-pre-slicing-ribs-before-smoking-them--has been a success for anyone.  My thoughts are smoke them for about 2 hours, put them all in an aluminum pan or two with some juice/sauce and rub covered for another 2, then take the top off the pans to finish them off for a bit.  After that I can just set the pans out and let people have at it.  This works beautifully with beef ribs, but I've never tried it with pork.  It sure would save me time and aluminum foil during the cook.  It will also keep anyone from grabbing too many and throwing meat away.
       
      As far as the prime rib on the rotisserie,  I'm planning on lighting a good base of coals topped with hickory logs I have and letting that dwindle down to a hot heap of coals.  Should I offset the roast a little with a pan underneath with some water in it to use the juices?  If so, I may be able to use our fire pit.  I think this will be a 5+ hour process, so I'm sure I'll have to add coals.  Since it'll be boneless, do I need to tie it with string or wire, or will the forks suffice?  This is going to be an experiment for sure, so I'm glad I'll have the baby back-ups.  Any open flame rotisserie experts out there?  As always, thanks for the help!
    • By odamaK
      So, I got my Joetisserie and began to look for a replacement motor in case after a year my motor failed. The joetisserie motor is .model RM-A101, and conveniently enough Onlyfire has the exact same model number motor that looks identical. Here is the link on Amazon for Canada, same item would be for the USA. 
       
      https://www.amazon.ca/Universal-Replacement-Stainless-Rotisserie-Aftermarket/dp/B00X7RKFWG/ref=asc_df_B00X7RKFWG/?tag=googlemobshop-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=293002225578&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1174210165666426299&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9000793&hvtargid=pla-502873780552&psc=1&th=1
       
      I ordered by both, and the stainless is going back, it does not match for reasons below. 
       
      Now this says it's rated for 20lbs and is 4 watts just like the Kamado Joe one except the kamado Joe says 50 lbs. which I find odd. 
       
      Also the stainless steel one on Amazon is a RM-A201 and the bolt pattern does not .match the Kamado Joe plate if you have to swap plates. 
       
      The description says it has anti backlash gears.
       
      It's not stronger for those looking for more power but this will allow you to swap adaptor plates and have a backup motor in case your motor dies during a spin possibly and this will get you back up and ruunnig. It's cheap insurance.  
       
      Can't upload photos from where I am but will try later. 
       
      Oh the joetisserie cord is longer. 
×
×
  • Create New...