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Hi

 

I have just got my rotisserie attachment sorted out for the kamado

 

 As I have not cooked with a rotisserie before I was looking for tips/cooking temperature advice for a whole chicken as a starter so I can get a feel for it. 

 

Also some other cooks that a rotisserie is well suited for.

 

Thanks in advance 

Nigel 

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I can't hep with the kamado rotisserie as mine is for my gas bbq. But i love a leg or shoulder of lamb on the rotisserie.  

 

Picanha is great. I have seen a few videos on pork knuckle and ithink that Will be my next one. 

 

Lamb I generally put  salt, lemon zest, oregano, garlic, pepper and oil.  Overnight is the best for this.  I trend to cook this slow for acouple of hours. Till it's tender and pull apart.

 

Serve with some red onions that have been salted fit half an hour. Drained and mixed with a pinch is sumac and parsley. Lemon cheeks for people too squeeze over if they want. 

 

 Hmmm i think i know what I'm cooking fit Sunday dinner!

20180818_124007.jpg

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So I got my Jotisserrie for Christmas and its been fantastic!  Every Sunday is rotisserie chicken night.  A few lessons learned that I've encountered over the last few months.

 

  1. Bank the coals and add a drip pan.  For the classic, a small bread loaf pan works but since you have a pit boss maybe a full size loaf pan.
  2. Sugar in your rub can help or hurt.  Too much and you burn, not enough and you may end of up with soggy skin.
  3. Make sure you start low on the fire as its hard to back it down, no different than normal Kamado cooks.
  4. Find a rub you like and find the right temp for the results you like in terms of skin crispiness.
  5. I had the temp too high as a result of an old gasket and the skin was super charred but the skin was amazingly crispy.  That's the balance I think that you're trying to achieve with a spun bird.
  6. Its pretty easy, enjoy and practice!

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46 minutes ago, KJTerp said:

Here is my longform Turkey procedure, which I follow pretty closely for Chicken.

 

And the gravy process:

 

That looks great stangely my pizza stone split in half last weekend so actually I can do the same as you and use half a stone to bank the fire. As long as I have a spell of dry weather this weekend I will give your method a go. This was just what I needed many thanks 

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Rotisserie chickens on the Kamado are my favorite! My usual go to is about a 4lb bird cooked at 350 for an hour to an hour and 15 minutes. Bank the coals to the bank and use a small drip pan as mentioned above to prevent major flare ups. My favorite rub for this is Plowboys yardbird.

 

Let us know how it goes!

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1 hour ago, BrewBQ said:

My favorite rub for this is Plowboys yardbird.

 

Let us know how it goes!

Unfortunately a lot of the rubs you guys use are not available here in the UK so I either make my own or sometimes look for something similar or based on the same flavour. Unfortunately not seen any plowboys rubs here. 

 

Will post when I do it 

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I have gotten in the habit of thoroughly air drying my chicken overnight before I cook - just on a cooling rack over a cookie sheet in the fridge overnight - it will really help with getting the skin crispy.  

 

Taco's al pastor are great on there too - slice pork thin marinade, and stack on spit.  When done remove the tongs and hold upright to slice the pork down. 

****learned a huge lesson first time doing this as it failed miserably.  Most al pastor marinades call for some pineapple juice.  I had a fresh pineapple, so threw it in the vitamix and made fresh juice thinking it would be even better.  However, the meat all fell off the skewer within the first hour.  Come to find out that fresh pineapple juice contains Bromelain (an enzyme that breaks down meat fibers) and a 24 hour marinade really gave it time to work.  After further research I found out that in the canning process the juice is heated up enough to kill this enzyme.  So if your going to marinate in pineapple juice for more than an hour - always go for canned.  But for short marinades fresh can be used as a tenderizer.  

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1 hour ago, grill seeker said:

I have gotten in the habit of thoroughly air drying my chicken overnight before I cook - just on a cooling rack over a cookie sheet in the fridge overnight - it will really help with getting the skin crispy.  

 

Taco's al pastor are great on there too - slice pork thin marinade, and stack on spit.  When done remove the tongs and hold upright to slice the pork down. 

****learned a huge lesson first time doing this as it failed miserably.  Most al pastor marinades call for some pineapple juice.  I had a fresh pineapple, so threw it in the vitamix and made fresh juice thinking it would be even better.  However, the meat all fell off the skewer within the first hour.  Come to find out that fresh pineapple juice contains Bromelain (an enzyme that breaks down meat fibers) and a 24 hour marinade really gave it time to work.  After further research I found out that in the canning process the juice is heated up enough to kill this enzyme.  So if your going to marinate in pineapple juice for more than an hour - always go for canned.  But for short marinades fresh can be used as a tenderizer.  

 

Second the overnight (AT LEAST)fridge  air dry. if you salt the bird right before you put it in, even better. just be forewarned, its gonna look WEIRD when it comes out, thats ok. i dont put my other spices on til after this process

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