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First Brisket on Kamado Joe Classic


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Morning Everyone. 

 

First, this forum has been great for getting tips and learning how to cook on my Kamado Joe. So far I’ve successfully made pizza, beef ribs, and chicken which have all

been amazing.

 

I want to smoke a brisket for mother’s day and have learned the how’s and what to dos but what I don’t know is how much charcoal do I use?  I haven’t bought the brisket yet but I’m assuming this will be a 8-10 hour smoke. I just want to make sure I have enough coal to keep the fire going. 

 

Also, do you wrap your brisket half way through or no?  

 

Thanks in advance!!!

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Welcome, BBQ Princess, glad to have both you and your Joe with us. I always cook with a full load of lump especially when I am dong a low and slow like brisket.

 

Here is pic of what I consider a full load in my Large BGE.You can see the lump is stacked flat on top and is laid evenly across the fire box,  well above the air holes, and to a height approximately 1 1/2 to 2" below where my deflector will hang. You don't want to run out of lump, especially on a long cook. Remember the size of your fire and the amount of heat it generates is not regulated by the amount of lump you load, but on  how big you allow your fire to get based on how much air you feed it. Temperature is all about AIR.  IMO, a low and slow cook like brisket requires a max load of lump combined with a small controlled fire in the center of the lump pile, using small  top and bottom vent openings. You are looking for steady temps in the 200's so don't worry about chasing target temps 20 to 40 degrees difference  IMO, is  not going to make a noticeable difference in your result.  IMO, quality results can be reached anywhere with in the 200's, not saying if your temp  climbs a little above 300 your brisket will be ruined, because it won't.  When it comes to wrapping brisket or ribs,  their seems to be as many opinions as their are back yard chefs. The current popular  trend seems to be wrapping with pink butcher paper half way through. Folks used to rely on  aluminum foil but some have said it does not allow sufficient air flow, traps water vapor,  and actually cooks your brisket with steam rather than roasting it. My two cents anyway.  Best of luck and happy cooking. 

IMG_0430.thumb.jpeg.d38bb1cb91e3a7b0bb6e49dade0e9bf7.jpeg

 

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Welcome the Guru .

 

As keeperovdeflame said a full load of lump ..

Every Brisket will tell you when it is done, Probe Tender,  which can be 5, 8 or 15 hours .

Everyone has their take on the way to cook brisket so here is mine .

 

Grill tempeture between 275-300

When the Brisket reaches an internal tempeture on 160 degrees I wrap in pink Paper and cook it until it is toothpick tender, meaning like sticking a toothpick into peanut butter feel .

Pull it off the fire and let it rest for 1hr. 

 

Enjoy Cooking 

 

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6 hours ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Welcome, BBQ Princess, glad to have both you and your Joe with us. I always cook with a full load of lump especially when I am dong a low and slow like brisket.

 

Here is pic of what I consider a full load in my Large BGE.You can see the lump is stacked flat on top and is laid evenly across the fire box,  well above the air holes, and to a height approximately 1 1/2 to 2" below where my deflector will hang. You don't want to run out of lump, especially on a long cook. Remember the size of your fire and the amount of heat it generates is not regulated by the amount of lump you load, but on  how big you allow your fire to get based on how much air you feed it. Temperature is all about AIR.  IMO, a low and slow cook like brisket requires a max load of lump combined with a small controlled fire in the center of the lump pile, using small  top and bottom vent openings. You are looking for steady temps in the 200's so don't worry about chasing target temps 20 to 40 degrees difference  IMO, is  not going to make a noticeable difference in your result.  IMO, quality results can be reached anywhere with in the 200's, not saying if your temp  climbs a little above 300 your brisket will be ruined, because it won't.  When it comes to wrapping brisket or ribs,  their seems to be as many opinions as their are back yard chefs. The current popular  trend seems to be wrapping with pink butcher paper half way through. Folks used to rely on  aluminum foil but some have said it does not allow sufficient air flow, traps water vapor,  and actually cooks your brisket with steam rather than roasting it. My two cents anyway.  Best of luck and happy cooking. 

IMG_0430.thumb.jpeg.d38bb1cb91e3a7b0bb6e49dade0e9bf7.jpeg

 

You’re amazing!  Thank you. I love all the info you gave and really appreciate it. Looks like you start your fire in the center. So, you think one starter in the middle and let the coals catch as time passes?  Really appreciate your insight!  Thank you!!!

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4 hours ago, WoodyT said:

Welcome the Guru .

 

As keeperovdeflame said a full load of lump ..

Every Brisket will tell you when it is done, Probe Tender,  which can be 5, 8 or 15 hours .

Everyone has their take on the way to cook brisket so here is mine .

 

Grill tempeture between 275-300

When the Brisket reaches an internal tempeture on 160 degrees I wrap in pink Paper and cook it until it is toothpick tender, meaning like sticking a toothpick into peanut butter feel .

Pull it off the fire and let it rest for 1hr. 

 

Enjoy Cooking 

 

Thank you, Woody!!!  Having mentors like you guys really helps!

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3 hours ago, Brandon said:

This was a great question as I keep reading about 8-12 hour cooking time on some meats. 

Glad you agree. I found tons of threads on timing and such but I have no idea where to begin. On the bright side, I freaking LOVE my Joe!!!  Can’t wait to smoke it right!!!

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Welcome to the fold. I've only found two rules here. 

It's hard to ruin food. 

None of us did things the same way twice until we figured out how to ruin food. 

 

As to briskets, there are many opinions, but a consistent one is to give the meat a long, slow rest once it's done. Plan for it to be done early and you'll have leeway if it cooks slower than you thought. If it cooks faster, towels and coolers will give you many hours to stall serving time.

 

HAve fun,

Frank

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Welcome aboard BBQ Princess!  Hit youtube and check out the Kamado Joe Channel.  You'll get an idea on how to get the fire going for different cooks as well as some good recipes and details around specific cooks, an invaluable resource!  It'll get you up and running and cut some of the learning curve out of the process.  Post pics of your cook!  Good luck!

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15 hours ago, SeaBrisket said:

Cooking can take 1-1.5 hours per pound, so plan accordingly. Though I'm curious about using butcher paper, I do not wrap.

 

It lets the brisket breath, still taking in the smoke and heat while being wrapped in a blanket of fat soaked paper so that it will not dry out .

 

I am still playing around with spritzing with apple juice to help set the bark before the wrap .

 

All in the Quest for my perfect brisket taste that I like .

 

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20 hours ago, BBQ_Princess said:

You’re amazing!  Thank you. I love all the info you gave and really appreciate it. Looks like you start your fire in the center. So, you think one starter in the middle and let the coals catch as time passes?  Really appreciate your insight!  Thank you!!!

Yeah, the whole idea is to keep your fire small so your temps stay low. The lump load in my Egg was actually for Pizza but then I use the same process and a full load  no matter what I am cooking. When it comes to smoking I am a less is more guy, so I don't use a lot of wood. I generally only scatter 3 or 4 smallish chunks in my lump. I use mostly mild woods, like Pecan, Peach, Apple, Cherry   and Alder for fish. 

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