Jump to content

social assassin

2-2-1 Method for Baby Back Ribs Didn't Work for Me

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, fbov said:

Decision criteria can vary 

Frank

My point, exactly.  We are talking about very thin meat and a lot of bone.  What and where are you measuring?  I don't think probe thermometers make much sense for pork ribs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2019 at 3:56 PM, SeaBrisket said:

I find ribs super easy and zero stress. I do nothing special to them and I don't use a thermometer to check when they're done. I cook indirect at 225 on the dome thermometer, no separate grill level thermometer (I also have the KJ Classic). Since I use a rib rack, I flip them over midway through, but if you're not using one you can just let it sit. I don't wrap at any point, I don't spritz. The bend test tells me when they're done. 

 

I always do St Louis style and that takes me 5.5-6 hours total. According to Meathead, whose recipe I follow, baby backs should take 3-4 (https://amazingribs.com/best-barbecue-ribs-recipe). 

I am currently smoking   ST. Louis ribs using meathead dry rub recipe.  Right now trying to get my Akorn down around 225.  How  did your ribs turn out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, packerfan66 said:

I am currently smoking   ST. Louis ribs using meathead dry rub recipe.  Right now trying to get my Akorn down around 225.  How  did your ribs turn out?

 

I've followed that recipe several times and it's always come out excellent. I don't sauce, I just serve that on the side. Also, I like to cut off the last few bones, the very small ones, from the rest of the rack and let those cook separate as it makes a great mid-smoke snack about 3 hours in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to get pork  ribs that are around 2 lbs. I like the way they cook/smoke. I do baby back ribs. I remove the membrane and do not turn mine. Bone side down the whole cook  225 to 250. I stay away from big racks of baby backs. I will buy the whole side of the rib from time to time, butt that is a whole different cook. I use a dry rub. Spray bottle ASV/AJ. Finish with a glaze of BBQ something I make. Usually sweet and sticky. I bend the rib and pull the whole rib through the sauce. No moping, no brushing. Back on after grill gets to 300 till glaze is set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/10/2019 at 11:19 PM, John Setzler said:

It's super important to distance yourself from most time and temperature based cooking methods for the big bbq meats.  None of them are going to work consistently.  You will NEVER EVER mess up a rack of any kind of ribs again after you learn what they feel like when they are done.  There is no way to hit that sweet spot (other than luck) by cooking to any time and temperature combination OR to any specific internal meat temperature.  

 

You can use the toothpick test, which is like probing brisket or boston butt for 'probe tenderness'.  Baby backs won't follow the 'bend test' properly like a rack of pork spares will so there is that to contend with also....

 

 

True, but helps to give you some hooks to make sure you don't have to open the grill constantly and that way you can do something else while cooking. 

 

I always aim for 1-2-1, works like a charm. But sometimes I take some time from the last stint. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Bonux said:

 

True, but helps to give you some hooks to make sure you don't have to open the grill constantly and that way you can do something else while cooking. 

 

I always aim for 1-2-1, works like a charm. But sometimes I take some time from the last stint. 

 

I fully understand and agree. My method is ~3.5, check to see if done. :-D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi SA,

 

Sorry about the wall of text.  I'll start by seconding what others have said as far as time and temp guidelines being sometimes very rough estimates.  Frankly, I don't think you did anything egregiously wrong for the maiden voyage other than be too faithful to the method you read about.  I too find that the 2-2-1 method is still overkill for baby back 90% of the time.  As far as what went wrong here (just based on picture and text and my own experience)-

 

1. As you found out, 212 degrees internal is way over temp for ribs.  I usually pull them off around 200 internal.  I would said they were done 30-60 minutes earlier= takes us right back to the problem with 2-2-1 timing.  Maybe the thickest baby back rack from a cold fridge and a grill holding a perfect 225 will take the full 5 hours.  Most won't.  I've modified it to more like 2- 1.5- .5 or 1.5-1-1, keeping the smoke time as the longest leg.  I usually just wing it with target meat temps during the same 3-leg cook.  I barely even lift the lid for the first hour or two other than to spritz or mop with apple juice once or twice.  I try to stay under 250 and keep a thin blue smoke until I hit 150-160 internal- very rarely happens outside 1.5-2.5 hours.  You can tell by whether or not the fat has started to split.  You'll see fresh cracks in the rub with juice coming out.  Then wrap in foil, rerub, pour some apple juice in the foil, and return to grill until ribs hit 185-190.  Foil helps power through the stall by using moisture in the foil from meat or liquids added to steam it.  Grill temp during wrap really doesn't matter as much.  A higher temp will speed up your cook and the foil will keep them moist.  But too high (above 350) and you start burning sugars in both the meat and the rub.  Smoke no longer matters either.  Meat stops taking smoke around 150-160.  Once the ribs hit 185-190, unwrap, sprinkle with rub again/hit them with sauce, and let them go to 200.  You can smoke again lightly during this last leg if you sauce.  Only the sauce is going to pick up smoke.  Pull from grill at 200.  They should have some noticeable pullback where the meat has shrunk and exposed the bones.  They should also bend substantially or split if you hold them with tongs in the middle or halfway from one end.  Very unusual for them not to turn out great this way.  Once in a while, I get a weird rack that doesn't cooperate and either dries out or never gets real tender.  Just luck of the draw sometimes.

 

2.  Is it possible the thermometer was touching a bone?  I'm not seeing a ton of pullback for that kind of temp.  Maybe it's just the angle of the photo.  Honestly, I don't even know if they would have come off in one piece at that temp.  I would expect them to be practically shredded just getting onto the platter.

 

3.  You said half was dry.  Was it the thinner end?  How was the other half?  Which part of the ribs did you stick the thermometer?  Was the charcoal evenly lit in the bowl or did you have a hot spot on one side?

 

4.  Deflector plates are a must for low and slow and I'm glad that you used them, but how about a water pan?  I know I'm on the wrong forum for this sort of blasphemy, but I learned on a Weber Smokey Mountain and water in the pan made a huge difference in cook quality as far as dry meat.  It also helps keep temps nice and stable.  Moisture helps smoke adhere to the meat.

 

5.  What kind of rub or sauce did you use and when did it go on?  I'm seeing what looks like large amounts of char on the both racks, more than I would expect for a low and slow.  Was there lots of sugar in either?  You said 250-280 temp, but did it ever get out of control for a few minutes?  Flare-ups?  Dman's pic is basically what color mine look like every time just before sauce goes on.  You want that nice deep red-brown mahogany look.

 

I hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't despair It will get better. Keep notes on the cooks for comparing between cooks. Also each slab of "food from the gods" are different, time will vary and they will be done when they want to be done, meat on a barbie or Kamado is really incharge. I think you just cooked to long, hard to use thermometer meat is too thin, I use a toothpick to test for doneness i've wrapped some and some not. It's a personal preference My wife likes wrapped i don't. Enjoy your grill and keep smoking.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a different approach when doing ribs - nice if you like Chinese style ribs. Firstly  I always remove the membrane from the inside of the ribs. Then rather than a rub I use a marinade - a mixture of Hoisin sauce, lemon juice (or sometimes Shaoxing rice wine), soy sauce and sesame oil (or olive oil works as well). I get a good coating on the ribs then let them marinade for 24 hours if possible. Then cook at a temp of around 280 until done (1-2 hrs max).

 

The marinade should tenderize the meat sufficiently that cooking at this higher temp and much shorter time results in ribs that are tender (but not fall-apart, fall-off-the-bone tender), but really juicy. No need for any sauce as you should end up with beautifully glazed juicy ribs. The thought of them is making me hungry !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SA 

How did your 2nd rib try go? I did a rack of st Louis style ribs Sunday. 230 degrees from noon to 5 pm didn't wrap. Tender used tooth pick to test for doness. Very moist. Hope you had better luck this time. It's a learning process. It will come after a while and every rack is different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybee it was a problem with the quality of the meat?

I'm from Sweden and we don't have a bbq culture.
Good quality is not easy to find for a reasonable price here.
One does not cut an animal in the same way as in the USA either

I've been a kamado owner for one year now and done pork ribs 10-15 times.
Tested different methods and they been great every time except the last time although I did not do anything different.
They were tough and a little dry. I suspect that the quality of the meat was the probem for me the last time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Similar Content

    • By Tarnation
      Smoke rolls early in the morning for this rack of ribs and a prime brisket.  Binder is mustard, rub for the ribs is a Traeger rub I poached from dad, rub for the brisket is Thundering Longhorn beef rub. I'll keep you updated.



    • By PatrickYYC
      Hi all,
       
      I will be firing up my big joe for the first time tomorrow for some baby back ribs.
       
      I have done ribs before on my Bradley smoker & weber gaser using the 3-2-0.5 (3 hours on the smoker, 2 hours wrapped on the Weber and 0.5 hours with sauce). I do the last two steps on the weber just because the ribs are more accessible for wrapping and sauce. Family usually loves these.
       
      Ribs on the Joe:
       
      I am planning on dry rub, no sugar ~5 hours @ 225-250 with no wrap, occasional spritzing and add sauce for last 30 minutes or so.
       
      Questions:
      1- Is a drop pan necessary? Dry or with liquid in it? Based on my reading so far, I think not necessary other than to keep the heat deflector clean... opinions?
      2- To wrap or not to wrap? It seems both are acceptable. preferences? impact?
      3- how do I know they are done? by temp? bones? probe?
       
      Any other suggestions?
       
      I'll post during and after pics tomorrow.
       
      Thanks

    • By Lydia
      Thanks to Kismet Kamado for putting me on to the technique detailed by keeperovdeflame on how to cook an easy spatchcock chicken.  I changed up my recipe by mixing my homemade basil pesto with some butter and putting that under the skin of the breast, thighs and legs.  Also, the veggies i used in the tray under the chicken were potato, carrots and parsnips from my garden and some little purple shallot onions.
       
      I was travelling quite nicely at 400 - 410F when I walked away and returned for it to be up to 450.  I tried closing the vents right down and it did work, so I took it all out after about 1 hour.  You will notice in my photos that I have two probes, one in the the thigh and the other in the breast.  Something seemed to go awry with what I thought was a good plan because the beeper started beeping on the weber temperature thingo after about 10 mins, alerting me that the chicken was finished, which it obviously wasn't.  Not sure what I did wrong with the positioning, so would appreciate any feedback about that.
       
      The chicken turned out  absolutely deeeeelicious!!!  The skin was lovely and crispy and all parts of the bird, even the breast, lovely and juicy. 
       
      Unfortunately my lovely veggies didn't turn out so well, with the majority being too far on the charred side of things, with the bottoms quite burnt.  The parts that did turn out well, were really delicious because of the chicken and pesto flavoured drippings, so I will definitely try this method again.  I was a bit reluctant to use my expensive staub in the kamado, so had used a metal tefal baking dish but think that perhaps placing it directly on the diffuser might have been the issue?  Maybe I should have used a trivet as a spacer??  
       
      Another thing I realised afterwards was that I shouldn't have  removed so much of the excess skin from around the neck because of the inevitable shrinkage.  It's all learning! :-)
       
      Suffice to say, we all really loved the meal and the Christening of my beloved new Kamado Joe Classic II.   It was a pretty small bird but I tell you what, that chicken and pesto smelt absolutely amazing 10 mins into the cook!!
       
      LOL, nothing against my Pro Q 20 elite but when my husband saw how quickly the kamado got to 400F with absolutely no mess or fuss, he was astonished and suitably impressed! :-)
       
      I actually wasn't going to share details of this first cook because it isn't my best work but I am confident that I - like everyone else - will learn lots along the way.  
       
      Thanks for reading my first post on my first cook.  Have a great day! :-)
       





    • By ClayB
      Had a day off so while doing some Honey do's around the house I smoked some ribs for supper. 

    • By CentralTexBBQ
      Documenting my cook on the 4th: Beef Plate Ribs, 3 slabs of baby backs, 4 pounds of sausage
       

       

       

       

       
      no plates or bbq sauce needed...
×
×
  • Create New...