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After about 5 or 6 years give or take, it is time to change the gaskets on my large Egg. This is actually the 3rd time in about 10 years of kamado cooking I have done a gasket replacement. I started out cooking on a Vision Pro C and blew through the standard stock black felt gaskets in about 2 years. I replaced them with Vision Nomex high heat gaskets and to my knowledge (I gave my Vision away when I got the Egg) they are still holding temp and  cooking.I got about 5 to 6 years out of my BGE Nomex high heat gaskets that came stock with the Egg. I am now  putting new High-Que nomex Gold Standard high heat gaskets, as they come highly rated. The replacement process is not something I would order off a lunch menu, but it is not that bad and very doable for the average kamado chef. 

 

Gasket changing technique from a complete idiot:blink:

 

1.  After you remove the old charcoal and give your kamado a general cleaning, removing grates and such, Soak your worn out gasket with acetone and let it sit for about an hour. I use a cheap paint brush to apply the acetone. 

2. Take a sharp edged paint scraper and starting at the seam where your gasket comes together, peel up the edge of one end. Then slide the scraper under the overlap and in a process of pulling up and sliding the scraper,  work your way  all the way around your kettle and remove the bulk of the gasket. 

3. Soak the remaining adhesive cement with acetone and continue to use the scraper to remove the bulk of the adhesive. 

4. At this point there usually remains some stubborn adhesive which will prevent your new gasket form adhering to the rims of your dome and kettle well. I  use a small palm sander with 80 grit and light pressure. (make sure you wear a protective dust mask as the ceramic dust will be really fine) This time it took me about 2 hours to get the rims as clean as I thought they need to be. 

5. Using a shop vac, pick up all the dust from the rim ad inside your kamado. 

6. Wipe down the rims with acetone and let it dry for about an hour before you apply the new gasket.

 

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After you get the rims and the neck of your top vent as clean as you want them apply the new gasket. You will need a sharp pair of shop scissors and either an exact knife or razor blade. Most gaskets come with a set of application instructions, but after all it is not rocket science. Just let the gasket fall into place with only a gentle pulling pressure so as to not stretch it. Let the gasket sit for a day before you cook, and make your fist couple of cooks at moderate or low and slow temps to seat the gasket. I will post some more pics as I apply my new gaskets. hope you all find this helpful. 

 

 

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Putting the new gaskets on is pretty easy. Just don't stretch the material (gentle pressure only). Most modern gaskets come with an adhesive backing, you simply start by pulling the backing from one end, lay that end on your dome rim, press it down, and then move around the dome, pulling the backing and guiding the gasket into place. Every once and while use the flat of your hand to push and rub flat the gasket you have already applied. I think it is best to start with the dome gasket, as it gets tight back by the hinge and; as the dome gasket is probably the most difficult you want plenty of room to work with. After you apply the kettle gasket and cut both to leave as little seam as possible, run your hands over both gaskets to insure the are flat and smooth. Then just shut the lid and let the weight of the dome press the kettle and dome gaskets together. My practice is to let the kamado set for 24 hours before I cook on it and then I use only moderate heat for the first couple of cooks. By the way don't forget the top vent gasket. Hope this helps, and Happy Cooking.

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This guy stopped by as I was finishing and said "not to bad, but of course you have opposing thumbs". He gobbled some ants and went on his way. Hope your found this useful. 

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42 minutes ago, Golf Griller said:

Reading this, you make me think that even I can replace my gasket. Just need to find time to do it.

Understand completely, I started thinking I should do this Spring of 2918 and that's when I purchased the gasket kit which sat on the shelf for more than a full year before I got around to it. The bad news and the good news, is as soon as you pull the old gasket off; there is no longer and fear of  procrastination, or gong back, you are committed, unless, of course,  you want your kamado to become a hat rack. :)

 

New gaskets and all cleaned,  ready to cook roast spatchcocked chicken and a pan of veggies on Thursday or Friday. Didn't completely enjoy the work, but can't beat the result with a stick. 

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You’ve had some great luck with gaskets. I have to replace mine 2-3 times a year. 

 

One thing ink to be cautious of is the thickness of the gasket. Some lids don’t close properly on overly thick gaskets. I made that mistake once thinking a thicker gasket would last longer. It just kept the lid from being able to close fully. 

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15 hours ago, EnlightenedVegan said:

 

 I appreciate typos and procrastination. 

Just saw that, well the 9 is next to the 0, what can I say. 

16 hours ago, BrianAZ said:

You’ve had some great luck with gaskets. I have to replace mine 2-3 times a year. 

 

One thing ink to be cautious of is the thickness of the gasket. Some lids don’t close properly on overly thick gaskets. I made that mistake once thinking a thicker gasket would last longer. It just kept the lid from being able to close fully. 

My old gaskets (BGE stock high heat)  were covered in grease, flater than flat, hard and slick, but they continued to hold temp and cook. No tell tale puffs of smoke around the kettle. There was absolutely no give to them at all, but they did not bother me during cooks. I have no idea how long I could have actually cooked on them. One thing I noticed as I changed them is that they were really stuck down good. I had a heck of a time getting all the adhesive residue off.  Ps. I cook a lot of pizza as well but generally keep the temps at 650 or below, nothing higher than that. 

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Quote

One thing ink to be cautious of is the thickness of the gasket. Some lids don’t close properly on overly thick gaskets. I made that mistake once thinking a thicker gasket would last longer. It just kept the lid from being able to close fully. 

I have in the past only used gaskets made by the company that made the kamado I was cooking on. Ie. Vision and BGE. This time I went with a HighQue gasket made to fit a large BGE, and it worked out perfectly no gaps or apparent alignment issues. 

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I've used High Que Gold Standard gaskets as replacements on all 3 brands of my kamados: Primo XL, Vision, and Kamado Joe Jr.  Just be sure to tell them specifically on which kamado you are replacing the gasket.  They will match thickness and width appropriately.

Also, I've always used their adhesive backed gaskets.  With proper surface prep they stick very well.  

 

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20 minutes ago, Jack 101 said:

I've used High Que Gold Standard gaskets as replacements on all 3 brands of my kamados: Primo XL, Vision, and Kamado Joe Jr.  Just be sure to tell them specifically on which kamado you are replacing the gasket.  They will match thickness and width appropriately.

Also, I've always used their adhesive backed gaskets.  With proper surface prep they stick very well.  

 

I have not cooked on them yet, but they seem like they are well attached and secure. Going to do a moderate heat 375 to 425 spatchcocked chicken and veggies cook tomorrow evening. 

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First cook after putting on new gaskets. Did a Spatchcocked Chicken and a pan of Veggies. Didn't get much above 400 degrees. No apparent alignment issues after the replacement,  and the new gaskets appear to be set down tight.my EGG cooks like it did when I first got it.  These new HighQue Gold Standard gaskets are without question the highest quality gaskets I have used. I got the model designed to fit a large EGG. and they are perfect in terms of width and thickness, with a very tight weave.  

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