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My family REALLY likes shi####o peppers. I am probably better positioned than 95% of the US in the ability to source perfect fresh ones any time (Suzuki Farms), but it is still a two-hour one-way trip. 

 

So, this year, I decided to go light on some of the hotter peppers and add five shi####o plants to the garden. This was a picture from early June, not looking too promising relative to other years, but that was before a hot and dry month.

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A couple weeks ago, they began to meaningfully flower. I pulled off a pepper here and pepper there, and they were great. Two Fridays ago, I managed to find enough to serve them as a konro course between chicken thigh. This Friday, we entertained again and we had enough to do another few skewers of peppers. This Sunday, I went to pick them again and had as many as grew the week prior.

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Tonight (Monday) I picked them again and had more than the day before.

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I am going to see what happens the rest of the week (it is going to get HOT, and things might slow down) but I need to learn some more shi####o recipes. I will start taking pics of the cooks. These things are so delicious my attitude about yield is pretty much "bring it on". This is where I am at today, the shi####os are biased towards the right side with the massive number of flowers:

MidJuly.thumb.JPG.33fc5755daed10d0b7a14e8bedc35431.JPG

 

All is well in garden land. Peppers and tomatoes are growing like crazy, everything else looks to be doing okay. The next three months are my favorite part of the culinary year. Every morning I go out and pick a bell for eggs, most evenings a jalapeno for something (although I am letting most go red for kamado chipotle powder). My kids pick strawberries and edamame, we have a lifetime supply of zucchini and cucumber, the corn is coming in, and our apple trees have (tiny) fruit for the first time. 

 

EDIT: Spelling and grammar.

Edited by gotzero

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That's pretty amazing!  Did you start them from seed or buy transplants?  Also, how much are you watering/week and what are the temps at in Delaware?

 

I'm struggling to get my pepper going.  I have some theories but wanted to check in with you since you're seeing just great success.  Also, did you start the garden bed with one 6" board and add the second for greater depth after the fact or were you always at 12"?

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39 minutes ago, UTVol said:

That's pretty amazing!  Did you start them from seed or buy transplants?  Also, how much are you watering/week and what are the temps at in Delaware?

 

I'm struggling to get my pepper going.  I have some theories but wanted to check in with you since you're seeing just great success.  Also, did you start the garden bed with one 6" board and add the second for greater depth after the fact or were you always at 12"?

 

I did transplants from chileplants dot com. I bought a six pack delivered the week of April 8th, kept them indoors in the sun until things warmed up, then started doing days outside, then outside all the time in larger pots, and then planted in the beds. One of the six plants looked really unhealthy so I did not end up putting it in the bed and it died shortly after. The beds were always ~12" sides and I redo the soil every year and cycle what goes in each bed. 

 

It has been abnormally hot and dry here with maybe one or twice a week lots of rain in a short period. I have hardly watered them. I skip over the pepper bed 80% of waterings. 

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Your garden looks great.  We have kept a veggie garden every year for 20 plus years, it's a fun hobby.  This year as far as peppers go we have jalapeno, cayenne, Thai, sweet banana, habanero, ghost, tabasco and serrano.  

 

We have about 70% of our garden in containers and the rest in raised beds.  our containers have water reservoirs under the soil and water with a wicking action.  The plants thrive in these.  We are in North Texas and hitting the 100's now, it's tough.  Drip irrigation and micro sprinklers help us out.

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