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fafrd

Adjustable Rig from Ceramic Grill Store

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New LG24 owner and Kamado newbie looking to upgrade the flimsy dual-grill this $500 Kamado came with.

 

This Adjustable Rig from the Ceramic Grill store looks pretty well-made and appears to be very flexible: https://ceramicgrillstore.com/collections/pit-boss-24-kamado-grill-costco/products/pit-boss-24-adjustable-rig-combo

 

Any owners with experience with this product (for any Kamado)?  Any negatives?  Is the quality and thickness of the stainless as good as it looks?

 

Not exactly a cheap accessory for a $500 Kamado ($183 currently on sale for $156) but if it will last the lifetime of the grill and greatly increase its flexibility and cooking configurations, I'm ready to take the plunge if other owners are happy with the product.

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I bought and used the CGS Adjustable Rig when I had my Pit Boss 24.  I also bought and used a CGS Adjustable Rig on my Vision which I purchased back in early 2012 and used regularly until I gifted it a week or so ago.

IMO CGS products are top notch, high grade SS, durable welds, very versatile.  You're right, they are not a cheap accessory.  But in this instance, you really do get what you pay for.  I recommend them highly.

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Yeah, I can talk to you about the Ceramic Grill Store (CGS) AR and other accessories. I have what's called a CGS AR Spider Combo which I originally purchased to go in my Vision Pro C and now use in my Large BGE. 

Here's my Bonafides.

IMG_0431.thumb.jpeg.89af699c0078ee97a0b4829b66e4e520.jpeg

My version of the AR has a spider welded to its bottom so the whole rack you see in this picture including the diffuser stone can be lifted into and out of my Kamado in one motion. In my experience, CGS makes well designed, extremely high quality, gear that can really cook. In my experience their gear is very practical and designed to by a cook for someone who wants to cook.  I have a ton of CGS stuff along with my AR Spider Combo, I have an extender, a sliding D rack, a couple of 13 X 17 brisket / rib racks, a total of three 16" round grates, a couple of 13 and 14" half stones, and several extra cross bars. Since I purchased my CGS gear probably 8 years ago I have cooked probably hundreds and hundreds of meals on it. I have found CGS gear to be durable, in fact it will certainly be still cooking when I no longer can. They use high quality heavy stainless and all of the welds on my gear are highly professional and tight. I can easily give CGS gear, and Tom the owner of CGS my highest recommendation, and I have no connection to the company other than being a happy customer that truly loves their gear. CGS gear IMO is most definitely worth the money, stated simply, in all my time on this forum and others I have never seen a post from anyone unhappy with their CGS purchase. The quality of any kamado is increased when you add CGS gear as it allows to make a wide variety of set ups to accommodate what ever you are cooking. Here is a pic of my last spatchcock chicken cook. 

IMG_0438.thumb.jpeg.f8b6cb76101e14baf09d295b83c5e680.jpeg

I would recommend you call CGS and talk with Tom personally about what grill you have and what you normally cook or want to cook, that is what I did, and I could not be happier with the advice he gave me. IMO Tom is a straight up guy and will sell you what you need, not just random gear to run up the price of your purchase. I regularly use every piece of gear he sold me, nothing sits idle for very long.  Happy Cooking

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33 minutes ago, Jack 101 said:

I bought and used the CGS Adjustable Rig when I had my Pit Boss 24.  I also bought and used a CGS Adjustable Rig on my Vision which I purchased back in early 2012 and used regularly until I gifted it a week or so ago.

IMO CGS products are top notch, high grade SS, durable welds, very versatile.  You're right, they are not a cheap accessory.  But in this instance, you really do get what you pay for.  I recommend them highly.

 

Just what I was hoping to hear, thanks.

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32 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:

Yeah, I can talk to you about the Ceramic Grill Store (CGS) AR and other accessories. I have what's called a CGS AR Spider Combo which I originally purchased to go in my Vision Pro C and now use in my Large BGE. 

Here's my Bonafides.

IMG_0431.thumb.jpeg.89af699c0078ee97a0b4829b66e4e520.jpeg

My version of the AR has a spider welded to its bottom so the whole rack you see in this picture including the diffuser stone can be lifted into and out of my Kamado in one motion. In my experience, CGS makes well designed, extremely high quality, gear that can really cook. In my experience their gear is very practical and designed to by a cook for someone who wants to cook.  I have a ton of CGS stuff along with my AR Spider Combo, I have an extender, a sliding D rack, a couple of 13 X 17 brisket / rib racks, a total of three 16" round grates, a couple of 13 and 14" half stones, and several extra cross bars. Since I purchased my CGS gear probably 8 years ago I have cooked probably hundreds and hundreds of meals on it. I have found CGS gear to be durable, in fact it will certainly be still cooking when I no longer can. They use high quality heavy stainless and all of the welds on my gear are highly professional and tight. I can easily give CGS gear, and Tom the owner of CGS my highest recommendation, and I have no connection to the company other than being a happy customer that truly loves their gear. CGS gear IMO is most definitely worth the money, stated simply, in all my time on this forum and others I have never seen a post from anyone unhappy with their CGS purchase. The quality of any kamado is increased when you add CGS gear as it allows to make a wide variety of set ups to accommodate what ever you are cooking. Here is a pic of my last spatchcock chicken cook. 

IMG_0438.thumb.jpeg.f8b6cb76101e14baf09d295b83c5e680.jpeg

I would recommend you call CGS and talk with Tom personally about what grill you have and what you normally cook or want to cook, that is what I did, and I could not be happier with the advice he gave me. IMO Tom is a straight up guy and will sell you what you need, not just random gear to run up the price of your purchase. I regularly use every piece of gear he sold me, nothing sits idle for very long.  Happy Cooking

 

Happy to hear the actual quality meets or exceeds the impression given by the website.  So all I’m down to now is do I just pick up the Rig and the 20” grill for $80+$53 or spend another $23 on the Combo pack to also get the 18” grill?

 

What configuration do you use for low and slow?  I’m primarily interested to understand alternatives to locate a water / drip pan between the coals and the meat...

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Personally I'd spend the extra $23 and have the extra versatility.

I've never used a water pan on any of my kamados.  For a drip pan I use cheap aluminum shallow roasters or if cooking meat that does not drip that much fat indirect, a foil wrapped deflector.

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27 minutes ago, fafrd said:

 

Happy to hear the actual quality meets or exceeds the impression given by the website.  So all I’m down to now is do I just pick up the Rig and the 20” grill for $80+$53 or spend another $23 on the Combo pack to also get the 18” grill?

 

What configuration do you use for low and slow?  I’m primarily interested to understand alternatives to locate a water / drip pan between the coals and the meat...

For your grill, I believe the 20"rack sits on top of the AR as a main grate, and the18 fits internally within the rack and can be positioned at different levels beneath the top or main grate. However, that's just what I think, I am not sure so I would definitely recommend calling Tom at CGS in Denton Texas and asking him your questions. In addition to other questions you may have,  I would want to know if the rig that fits your kamado comes with a spider welded to the bottom or if I needed to purchase one to hold a deflector beneath the rig. He really knows his gear and how it fits into the kamados he builds it for. As a side note, most kamado cooks will tell you that water pans are a technique utilized in the dryer cooking environment of an offset smoker. Most if not all kamado cooks will tell you water pans are not necessary when cooking low and slow in the much more humid cooking environment that a kamado provides. 

 

CGS Phone (940) 387- 0100

email: sales@ceamicgrillstore.com

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24 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:

For your grill, I believe the 20"rack sits on top of the AR as a main grate, and the18 fits internally within the rack and can be positioned at different levels beneath the top or main grate. However, that's just what I think, I am not sure so I would definitely recommend calling Tom at CGS in Denton Texas and asking him your questions. In addition to other questions you may have,  I would want to know if the rig that fits your kamado comes with a spider welded to the bottom or if I needed to purchase one to hold a deflector beneath the rig. He really knows his gear and how it fits into the kamados he builds it for. As a side note, most kamado cooks will tell you that water pans are a technique utilized in the dryer cooking environment of an offset smoker. Most if not all kamado cooks will tell you water pans are not necessary when cooking low and slow in the much more humid cooking environment that a kamado provides. 

 

CGS Phone (940) 387- 0100

email: sales@ceamicgrillstore.com

 

Yeah, the 20” grill sits on top and the 18” grill sits ‘internally’ at one of various positions depending on where the adjustable bars are located.  They have a video which makes it all very clear.

 

For my grill, there is no spider welded to the bottom (perhaps because the LG24’s included heat shield has 3 ‘legs’.

 

Will definitely contact Tom @ CGS before buying.

 

And on water pan, I appreciate the heads-up and will try my first low and slow rib cook on the Kamado without a water pan (though I suppose I’ll still want a drip pan, right?).

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I've never used a drip pan when cooking ribs.  I wrap the deflector plate(s) on the Primo so that HD aluminum foil covers the top surface.  When the cook is complete and the deflectors have cooled, I remove and discard the foil. 

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46 minutes ago, Jack 101 said:

I've never used a drip pan when cooking ribs.  I wrap the deflector plate(s) on the Primo so that HD aluminum foil covers the top surface.  When the cook is complete and the deflectors have cooled, I remove and discard the foil. 

Good to know, thanks.

 

Spoke to Tom and he confirmed water pans are not needed when cooking low and slow on a Kamado.

 

I’m probably going to experiment a bit with the stock grills to gain more experience (only a single cook on my Kamado so far) so I have a better idea of all the things I want to take advantage of the free shipping offer, but there is almost certainly a CGS AR in my Kamado future!

 

Thanks all for the inputs and suggestions.

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Like Jack, I just wrap my deflector in foil If you decide to  use a drip pan for your  ribs; (one tip) if you set your drip pan directly on top of your deflector stone the fatty contents of the pan will  fry and most likely burn and char which creates an oily smoke. When your ribs bend easily when you pick up one end with tongs they are usually done. If you probe the connective tissue between the bones you want it to feel like butter. My ribs usually take 3 to 3 1/2 hours. Have fun, and enjoy your cook.

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By the way, CGS sells, or used to sell, a SS "hoop" that is to have aluminum foil stretched over it and used as a drip pan which precisely fits the expanded rig and prevents having to wrap the deflector.   I bought one when I bought the rig for the Vision and used it often.  It was not expensive.

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9 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:
Quote

Like Jack, I just wrap my deflector in foil

 

I can see how the deflector can be wrapped in foil but I don't understand how that keeps drippings from running over the edge.  Are you forming a lip of some gnd with the foil?  Any pics would be worth 1000 words...

 

9 minutes ago, keeperovdeflame said:

If you decide to  use a drip pan for your  ribs; (one tip) if you set your drip pan directly on top of your deflector stone the fatty contents of the pan will  fry and most likely burn and char which creates an oily smoke. When your ribs bend easily when you pick up one end with tongs they are usually done. If you probe the connective tissue between the bones you want it to feel like butter. My ribs usually take 3 to 3 1/2 hours. Have fun, and enjoy your cook.

 

I'm a very low and slow smoker.  I smoke ribs in the Fatboy at 175-225F over 5-6 hours.  Brisket goes 20-24 hours.   I imagine your ribs are cooked at higher temps than mine.

 

The Fatboy has a built-in water pan so any drippings that escape just float on the surface where they congeal into a floating layer of congealed fat once everything cools down.

 

The idea of beng able to go back to smoking dry without fear of it getting too dry is interesting.  The Fatboy had one feature that the Kamado cannot compete with:  smoke flowed through hollow side-walls, entered the smoke chamber along the top 1/2" of both side walls, flowed down through however many racks of meat filled the snoke chamber, and then flowed into the hollow back wall through holes in the back just above the water pan and up to a vent at the top of the hollow back wall cavity.

 

Very nice uniform top-to-bottom flow of smoke through meat unperturbed by the water pan or a dripping pan.

 

So I'd like to keep a smoke flow as uniform as possible in the Kamado and now that I'm understanding the benefits of moving the pizza stone hign into the dome, I may want to try doing the same with low and slow.

 

Putting the heat deflector in the low position with a drippings-pan (or aluminum foil equivalent) as low as possible (~3" below feltline) should give the deflected smoke a good 6" or more to 'recover' close to a uniform bowl-width flow before passing through the meat racks.

 

Honestly, if I didn't need to warry about off-flavors from burings dippings that hit the lump, I wouldn't put any drippings collector or anything at all between the lump and the meat...

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Honestly, I just don't get enough liquid dripping from ribs cooked indirect at +/-250* to warrant building an aluminum foil lip.

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