Jump to content

Joetisserie with heat deflector


Heuer
 Share

Recommended Posts

Although I have had many successful cooks using the Joetisserie on my KJ we have always found the food could easily be spoilt by fat dropping on the coals and tainting everything with smoke - and not the good kind. I have tried stacking the coals on one side and putting a drip pan under the meat but the results can be patchy. So last night I decided to use a heat deflector on the D&C:

20190807_165008.thumb.jpg.e5a4900bfa78d373f3cee13ad3ca6de9.jpg

 

The result was a superb sirloin joint with the hint of the KBB charcoal and no burnt fat aroma or taste. I set the motor going so it spun the meat clockwise (from the viewpoint of the above photo) which encouraged any juices to roll off onto the deflector rather than the coals. 

 

Surprised to see this method is not standard practice especially with chicken which usually tastes horrible when completely exposed to the hot coals for an hour or more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Personally I think that using a heat deflector while cooking with the Joetisserie is defeating the purpose of the process.  I'm not sure what the issue the original poster has with his setup but the ENTIRE IDEA behind cooking on a rotisserie is self-basting and dripping on the coals underneath to create that smoke and flavor that comes from it.  

 

I think too many folks in the BBQ community are deep diving too far into the 'white smoke' issues and letting it get the best of them.  There is no BAD smoke that comes from fat dripping on the hot coals or fire.  BAD smoke comes from slow smoldering wood only.  

 

Now it IS possible that someone may not like the flavor profile produce by the rotisserie.  It's that's the case then just don't use the rotisserie.  In my humble opinion, the self-basting feature is not worth the hassle of setting it up.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/8/2019 at 9:31 AM, Heuer said:

Surprised to see this method is not standard practice especially with chicken which usually tastes horrible when completely exposed to the hot coals for an hour or more.

 

Not to be rude, but my chickens only take about 45-55 minutes when I spin, so that may be because the chicken is overdone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/24/2020 at 12:42 PM, John Setzler said:

Personally I think that using a heat deflector while cooking with the Joetisserie is defeating the purpose of the process.  I'm not sure what the issue the original poster has with his setup but the ENTIRE IDEA behind cooking on a rotisserie is self-basting and dripping on the coals underneath to create that smoke and flavor that comes from it.  

 

I think too many folks in the BBQ community are deep diving too far into the 'white smoke' issues and letting it get the best of them.  There is no BAD smoke that comes from fat dripping on the hot coals or fire.  BAD smoke comes from slow smoldering wood only.  

 

Now it IS possible that someone may not like the flavor profile produce by the rotisserie.  It's that's the case then just don't use the rotisserie.  In my humble opinion, the self-basting feature is not worth the hassle of setting it up.  

 

Not sure where you're going with that last sentence, John.  Thought you were a fan of the Joetisserie..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, DevilDog0402 said:

 

Not sure where you're going with that last sentence, John.  Thought you were a fan of the Joetisserie..

 

That sentence is in the context of setting up a joetisserie and using a heat deflector between the meat and the fire.  In that configuration, self basting is the only thing you are getting from the Joetisserie.  To me, that adds nothing of significance to the cook.  

 

The Joetisserie is a tool that exploits the ability cook cook over direct heat/fire at a slower pace.  That effect on the meat is worth the effort.  Self-basting is just a side effect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, John Setzler said:

 

That sentence is in the context of setting up a joetisserie and using a heat deflector between the meat and the fire.  In that configuration, self basting is the only thing you are getting from the Joetisserie.  To me, that adds nothing of significance to the cook.  

 

The Joetisserie is a tool that exploits the ability cook cook over direct heat/fire at a slower pace.  That effect on the meat is worth the effort.  Self-basting is just a side effect.

 

I see.  :good:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, John Setzler said:

The Joetisserie is a tool that exploits the ability cook cook over direct heat/fire at a slower pace.  That effect on the meat is worth the effort.  Self-basting is just a side effect.

As the OP, in my experience the deflectors reach a high temperature, enough to vaporise any meat juices and add to the flavour profile. This is the equivalent of the 'flavoriser' bars on the Weber or putting a sturdy drip tray under the rotisserie. The correct layout for a rotisserie would vertical with the flame on the side (as used for Gyros) or the Victorian roasting spit jack with the fire on the side. 

Gyros-e1549369756829.jpg.3e28bccb7e786ead361e540ba66a5407.jpg

 

Bottle-jack.png.d777c0ceed7c505e8891478e6cad3042.png

 

The goal is self basting not soot and burnt grease flavouring. In the case of the Victorian clockwork jack spit, it was designed to allow the collection of the valuable meat drippings whilst still using radiant heat and self-basting.

 

The Joetisserie is a compromise and although you can stack the coals to one side there is insufficient room, in the Classic at least, to get a 'clean' cook as the drip tray will invariably be in contact with the flames.

 

I have done many rotisserie cooks using both methods and IMHO the deflector provides a better and more flavoursome cook. From your comments John you do not seem to have done so - maybe you should give it a try and report back and share your experiences?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Heuer said:

From your comments John you do not seem to have done so - maybe you should give it a try and report back and share your experiences?

 

I absolutely have tried it.  I tried it twice in fact at two different temperature ranges with a chicken and two ranges with a pork loin.  In neither case did I see or taste any benefit from cooking indirect on the grill grate.  I have never had any issues with soot getting on my food.  The burnt vaporized grease IS part of what provides the flavor profile for rotisserie cooking.  I have no issues with that.  THAT is part of the grilling experience all the way around.  Its one of the reasons we cook over fire instead of cooking on something like that vertical electric spit you showed here :)  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 1/24/2020 at 12:42 PM, John Setzler said:

Personally I think that using a heat deflector while cooking with the Joetisserie is defeating the purpose of the process.  I'm not sure what the issue the original poster has with his setup but the ENTIRE IDEA behind cooking on a rotisserie is self-basting and dripping on the coals underneath to create that smoke and flavor that comes from it.  

 

I think too many folks in the BBQ community are deep diving too far into the 'white smoke' issues and letting it get the best of them.  There is no BAD smoke that comes from fat dripping on the hot coals or fire.  BAD smoke comes from slow smoldering wood only.  

 

Now it IS possible that someone may not like the flavor profile produce by the rotisserie.  It's that's the case then just don't use the rotisserie.  In my humble opinion, the self-basting feature is not worth the hassle of setting it up.  

 

John and others, I would appreciate one word of advice regarding the Joetisserie set up, if you please. 

I have recently purchased one for my Classic II and I absolutely love it: I have roasted two chickens (two separate cooks) using the technique that John shared in his awesome video (thank you!), so with charcoal banked on the back and direct flame, and they both came up spectacular - juiciest roast chickens I have ever had!

 

However, the issue I have is grease dripping onto the ash tray and the metal piece the ash tray slides on. The whole thing became a greasy mess and it took me forever to clean it and make sure ash would not stick to the ash tray...

 

Any word of advice to avoid/limit that? I use a Kickash basket by the way. I was thinking of using the Joetisserie with the divide and conquer rack in place and put a foil drip pan on top of the accessory rack underneath the meat? Would that be a good idea or a terrible idea? I even tried lining the ash tray in foil, which is however impractical to say the least...

 

Thank you for any wisdom you can share!

9EE552BB-24FB-47A1-BB03-E4C68D8F0FF2.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Red&Blue Kamado said:

 

John and others, I would appreciate one word of advice regarding the Joetisserie set up, if you please. 

I have recently purchased one for my Classic II and I absolutely love it: I have roasted two chickens (two separate cooks) using the technique that John shared in his awesome video (thank you!), so with charcoal banked on the back and direct flame, and they both came up spectacular - juiciest roast chickens I have ever had!

 

However, the issue I have is grease dripping onto the ash tray and the metal piece the ash tray slides on. The whole thing became a greasy mess and it took me forever to clean it and make sure ash would not stick to the ash tray...

 

Any word of advice to avoid/limit that? I use a Kickash basket by the way. I was thinking of using the Joetisserie with the divide and conquer rack in place and put a foil drip pan on top of the accessory rack underneath the meat? Would that be a good idea or a terrible idea? I even tried lining the ash tray in foil, which is however impractical to say the least...

 

Thank you for any wisdom you can share!

 

 

Put your iron grate in for the rotisserie cooks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...