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garyk10

Water Getting Into Ash Tray

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Sometimes I cannot get the cover on my Akorn before it rains.  When it rains water collects in the ash pan, but none of the charcoal is wet.  All vents are closed.  Any ideas on where rain is getting in and how to stop it?

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I agree with John on this. If you do get water in dump all the ash then prop it up with the slide wide open on the bottom and let it drain till nothing is coming out. I usually turn mine upside down for a while after draining with it propped just to make sure.

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Keep it covered religiously but if you get caught in the rain, like robertyb said, take it off, empty the ashes, shake as much water out as possible, and then find a sunny spot for it to bake in for a few hours.

 

This is a great opportunity to clean the ash tray and remove any greasey ashes too, as dirt attracts moisture out of the air, and moisture rusts things.  The cleaner you keep the Akorn the longer it will last.

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One thing people might not realize.  Water and hardwood wood ash combine to make lye.  Which is corrosive as hell ad will quickly eat metal just as fast acid would.


Tom

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This happened to my Akorn. It has rusted pretty bad now. I think this is the last season for it. I tried to keep it out of the rain and put it in the garage when its not hot.

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Whenever my Akorn might stay outside in the rain, I have a very simple solution that I practice "the next morning."

 

I open the grill, knock the ashes off the grate, gather up the un-burned charcoal for re-use, then detach the bottom segment for cleaning.  Then, I place it upside-down below the grill, propped-up on one edge by a small rock.  Rain will now harmlessly fall off the painted surface.

 

Then, I proceed to scrub the cast-iron grill with water-only and wipe down all inside surfaces.  (Yeah, I'm a bit anal-retentive about "food residue," and my grill basically looks as clean as the day I unpacked it, except that the ... clean ... cast-iron is now well seasoned.)

 

I then close the lid, placing a small stick in it, and slightly open the top vents.

 

In this way, "air can circulate freely everywhere, and rainwater can pass straight on through."

 

(FYI, I actually switched to this practice after initially covering the unit, because I found that moisture readily accumulated under the covers.)

 

Then, given that the whole grill is actually so small and light, I started taking the grill back inside and storing it on a shelf in the garage. :-D  (Still doing all of the things previously mentioned, but now storing it inside in-the-dry.)

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