Jump to content

Best configuration for smoking 3 racks of ribs on Kamado?


fafrd
 Share

Recommended Posts

On 8/25/2019 at 9:18 AM, fafrd said:

Well, results of my first rib smoke are in and it’s a mixed bag.

 

After the advice from everyone here, I decided to skip rotation and ended up leaving the Kamado closed up for 5 hours at 200F.

 

I was able to monitor rub temps through the vent and knew they were not yet done when I decided to probe more thoroughly after 5 hours.  Here’s what things looked like when I first went in:

 

870D60A4-1680-4BCC-BBC9-1894DFA6BD55.thumb.jpeg.ffa202b2282362ceec64715cf42d943f.jpeg

 

At that point I cranked temps to 250F and the first (closest) small rack was done 60 minutes later.  Surprisingly, the largest rack in the center was done next after another 15 minutes, and the small rack at the back was done last after a total of 6-1/2 hours.

 

Here’s what things looked like as I pulled the final rack and shut things down;

 

19668A00-D5E5-48A9-A4B0-AAEE349B1B3D.thumb.jpeg.e6668bf66c353869559bbb80fe4c839e.jpeg

 

First the positives:  all of the ribs were good, and the ends were no more cooked than the center, so my funky oblong heat deflector stack seems to have worked well to protect the ends from excessive heat.

 

The center rack was as good as the best ribs I’ve smoked on my $3000 Fatboy (and for a first effort on the Kamado, that’s saying something).

 

And a final positive is the fuel efficiency of these Kamados.  I stuck to the same Kingsford Professional/Competition Briquettes I use on the Fatboy for as much of an Apples-to-Apples comparison as possible, and the amount of briquettes I had left after this 6-1/2hour smoke was complete was remarkable:

 

0EB9D92F-7193-4544-A1BD-E1658466B124.thumb.jpeg.0ec6ed9b28919838cb2feb98766d0dfe.jpeg

 

I had had the placesetter legs up in the notches and lit the very center of the pile, so that’s close to the full volume of briquettes I started with and over half of those briquettes are untouched.  I was concerned my heat deflector stack might reduce capacity too much for rib smokes, but that is no longer a concern.

 

So now the negatives:  both outside racks (the close rack I pulled first and the far rack I pulled last) were not as moist as the center rack.  Now, don’t get me wrong, they were still delicious but just did not measure up against the out-of-this-world moistness of the central rack.

 

I’m suspecting the outside racks got exposed to more dry smoke than the center rack which was over the center of the water-filled drip pan.

 

So if I ever smoke 3 racks in vertical rib holders again, I will be rotating them hourly (which is a real PITA in vertical racks).

 

And if I can figure out how to do it, I’d ideally like to get a stack of three flat racks centered on the drip pan (which might allow me to skip rotating, but would be much easier to rotate than the vertical configuration in any case).

 

And the only other small negative is that temperature control is pretty much mandatory for low and slow on a Kamado (but most of you already knew that).  I had a BBQ Guru (PID w/ fan) to control my Fatboy but when the controller conked out, I discovered the Fatboy was temperature stable enough to cook ribs with a maximum of hourly (small) vent adjustments.  I was checking the Kamado every 15 minutes and even with that degree of attention, it never really settled down anywhere and was always either slowly hearing of slowly cooling.  So I’ll need to make an adapter to fit my fan to the air intake and hook up a PID.  For most of this smoke, I had the outvent cracked 1/16” and the invent closed except for a 1/16” - 1/8” sliver where the slider overlaps the ceramic - there is not fine-enough manual control to hold at 200F once everything is heated up.

 

Overall, I’m very happy with how this first Low-and-Slow on the Kamado went, but I’m not ready to put the Fatboy on Craigslist just yet...

 

Follow-on footnote to my above report:

 

We had the leftover ribs for lunch today and I had managed to save a bit of each rack.

 

Comparing when eaten slightly cooler reheated out of the fridge, the difference in moisture we perceived the day of the cook was confirmed - the center rack was noticeably more moist / less dry than the outer 2 racks.

 

But another difference was also apparent that we’d missed the first day: outer racks had noticeably more smoke flavor than central rack.  I’d say the outer racks were a bit too smoke-flavored, while the central rack was way undersmoked (pretty much could not discern any clear smoke flavor).

 

So my guess is that there were two things going on:

 

-central rack got exposed to more water vapor from the drip pan than the outer racks and so was noticeably more moist.

 

-outer racks essentially masked central rack from smoke, so were a bit over-smoked themselves while leaving central rack essentially unsmoked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, fafrd said:

So my guess is that there were two things going on:

- central rack was in the middle, where it's coolest, so it cooked more gently and didn't dry out. 

- outer racks were next to the hot, smokey air coming up around the deflector, so they got both more heat and more smoke. 

 

This is why I always rotate every couple hours. 

 

I also haven't seen anyone who puts more mass between the fire and their food. You kept the ends from burning, but you also kept the fire away from the center rack. Look at your air flow. The elongated deflector aims heat to the side where the outer ribs form a wall to protect the middle rack. It also insulates the water pan, so it never boils. 

 

This may sound odd, but... perhaps you should stop trying to be perfect out of the gate every time and learn how to use the cooker on its own terms. Let experience teach you. Try things. The lessons you teach yourself are always more effective. Use the forum as a sounding board for ideas, and notice that most Kamado owners don't use a lot of accessories. 

 

See what your Kamado can do, as delivered; there's a reason manufacturers all market a similar product. 

 

Have fun,

Frank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, fbov said:
Quote

 

- central rack was in the middle, where it's coolest, so it cooked more gently and didn't dry out. 

- outer racks were next to the hot, smokey air coming up around the deflector, so they got both more heat and more smoke. 

 

This is why I always rotate every couple hours. 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, I have a pretty good idea of what was going on and why the ribs came out the way they did.  I've been smoking ribs on webbers, offsets, and my Fatboy for over 20 years now, and learned the importance of rotating racks from early on.  I generally rotate hourly both end-to-end as well as right-to-left.

 

The only reason I did not rotate this first time trying a smoke on the Kamado was the large number of people here in the forum who told me it is not necessary.  I decided to give it a try since first, it's enough of a pain that it would be great if it can be avoided (especially with vertical holders) and second, it's always better to avoid opening a cooker/oven when possible.

 

Now I know rotation is also necessary on a Kamado to get uniform smoke & moisteness, at least when cooking vertically (though I'm pretty sure the same will be true side-by-side (flat) as well).

 

Quote
Quote

I also haven't seen anyone who puts more mass between the fire and their food. You kept the ends from burning, but you also kept the fire away from the center rack. Look at your air flow. The elongated deflector aims heat to the side where the outer ribs form a wall to protect the middle rack. It also insulates the water pan, so it never boils. 

 

Yeah, I may be the first Kamado owner who tried to simulate an oblong heat deflector using the placesetter and two round puzza stones/heat deflectors.  If/when I decide this is the way to go, I'll probably buy a large oblong heat deflector just because it's easier,p and simpler, though the stack worked perfectly in that regard and the more heat mass in the cooker the better as far as temperature stability...

 

The fact that all three racks cooked approximately evenly makes me think the temperature, heat, and access to 'the fire' were pretty uniform.  It the exposure to smoke and the exposure to moisture that appear to have varied with position.

 

The smoke pretty clearly rises from either side giving the outside side of each outside rack a great deal more exposure to smoke than the center rack and inside side of the outside racks, which were protected from exposure to the smoke.

 

Makes total sense, though without testing it we'd have no idea what impact on taste it would have, and now we know - rotating differently-positioned racks in a Kamado is important for uniform smoke taste.

 

If I've got to rotate anyway, rotating ribs flat is much easier than rotating them in those vertical holders, so I'm pribably going to go back to cooking flat.

 

Moisture is a bit trickier to understand.  I smoke at 200F partly to avoid boiling and excessive steam.  The waterpan itself was largely protected from direct exposure to the fire, but there was some areas not protected by the heat deflectors so there may have been a small amount of local boiling going on there.  In any case, there was a great deal of water vapor coming off of the drip pan.  The 18" pan was filled with close to a gallon of water at the start of the cook and there was less than a quart left when I cleaned up the next morning.

 

I would have thought that water vapor would have flowed through all racks uniformly, but what I now suspect is that the smoke (and dry, hot air) at the sides displaces the water vapor (or at least dilutes it) so the outside sides effectively have for less moisture than the protected/sheltered center.

 

Quote

This may sound odd, but... perhaps you should stop trying to be perfect out of the gate every time and learn how to use the cooker on its own terms. Let experience teach you. Try things. The lessons you teach yourself are always more effective. Use the forum as a sounding board for ideas, and notice that most Kamado owners don't use a lot of accessories. 

 

See what your Kamado can do, as delivered; there's a reason manufacturers all market a similar product. 

 

Have fun,

Frank

 

Oh, I'm not trying to be perfect, and learning what this new cooker can do is precisely what I'm in the thick of.

 

The reason I may not be as interested to follow in the footsteps of 'most Kamado owners' and master the cooker with stock accessories before branching out is that I've got a Fatboy that does a fantastic job smoking ribs, so my only interest in smoking ribs on the Kamado will be if it can come pretty close to matching the quality of what I get with the Fatboy (while also hopefully being a bit easier / less involved).

 

And using the forum as a sounding board for ideas is precisely why I am here - to get insights and suggestions from much more  experienced Kamado owners such as yourself (and so I don't waste time trying anything doomed to fail for known reasons:).

 

So now that I've tried vertical cooking and determined it won't give me the quality and uniformity I seek without rotating (which is too much work in a vertical configuration), and now that this first cook has given me some idea of the smoke and moisture gradients within the cooker, I'm going switch to multi-layer flat cooking of ribs with rotation.  2 grills with 2 racks on one rack and the 3rd rack on the second grill will be pretty easy-peazy and with rotation, I suspect the quality will be good.

 

But I'm also interested to try a 3-stack with a single rack centered on each layer.

 

With the accessories I have, I can just close the lid with 3 grills, the lowest 20" grill positioned directly on the drip pan, an 18" grill positioned 3" higher in the middle of the A/R,  and the highest 20" grill on top of the AR:

 

F37966BE-E7D5-4258-A5DD-D18BA28B72D8.thumb.jpeg.d0d25fef228bcd0bf39046835027e12d.jpegDDEC5B71-6B33-4C5E-ADC0-32164EA8199F.thumb.jpeg.02f4eaa651d4f8873b8cb18e0e44ee7f.jpeg

 

This leaves me with 4” of clearance below the dome and 3” between grills, so I should be able to stack 3 racks of ribs up in the center easily.

 

The lowest rack will get the most moisture and pretty much no smoke, the top rack will get the most smoke and the minimum amount of moisture, and the middle rack should be somewhere in between.

 

So I’ll need to rotate which should be easy except perhaps for the lowermost rack, which has to be lifted 3/4” to clear the A/R.

 

A side benefit of this configuration is if I ever need to smoke 6 racks again (unlikely, but you never know), 3 layers of 2 should work pretty easily.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/27/2019 at 3:04 PM, fafrd said:

 

Oh, I have a pretty good idea of what was going on and why the ribs came out the way they did.  I've been smoking ribs on webbers, offsets, and my Fatboy for over 20 years now, and learned the importance of rotating racks from early on.  I generally rotate hourly both end-to-end as well as right-to-left.

 

The only reason I did not rotate this first time trying a smoke on the Kamado was the large number of people here in the forum who told me it is not necessary.  I decided to give it a try since first, it's enough of a pain that it would be great if it can be avoided (especially with vertical holders) and second, it's always better to avoid opening a cooker/oven when possible.

 

Now I know rotation is also necessary on a Kamado to get uniform smoke & moisteness, at least when cooking vertically (though I'm pretty sure the same will be true side-by-side (flat) as well).

 

 

Yeah, I may be the first Kamado owner who tried to simulate an oblong heat deflector using the placesetter and two round puzza stones/heat deflectors.  If/when I decide this is the way to go, I'll probably buy a large oblong heat deflector just because it's easier,p and simpler, though the stack worked perfectly in that regard and the more heat mass in the cooker the better as far as temperature stability...

 

The fact that all three racks cooked approximately evenly makes me think the temperature, heat, and access to 'the fire' were pretty uniform.  It the exposure to smoke and the exposure to moisture that appear to have varied with position.

 

The smoke pretty clearly rises from either side giving the outside side of each outside rack a great deal more exposure to smoke than the center rack and inside side of the outside racks, which were protected from exposure to the smoke.

 

Makes total sense, though without testing it we'd have no idea what impact on taste it would have, and now we know - rotating differently-positioned racks in a Kamado is important for uniform smoke taste.

 

If I've got to rotate anyway, rotating ribs flat is much easier than rotating them in those vertical holders, so I'm pribably going to go back to cooking flat.

 

Moisture is a bit trickier to understand.  I smoke at 200F partly to avoid boiling and excessive steam.  The waterpan itself was largely protected from direct exposure to the fire, but there was some areas not protected by the heat deflectors so there may have been a small amount of local boiling going on there.  In any case, there was a great deal of water vapor coming off of the drip pan.  The 18" pan was filled with close to a gallon of water at the start of the cook and there was less than a quart left when I cleaned up the next morning.

 

I would have thought that water vapor would have flowed through all racks uniformly, but what I now suspect is that the smoke (and dry, hot air) at the sides displaces the water vapor (or at least dilutes it) so the outside sides effectively have for less moisture than the protected/sheltered center.

 

 

Oh, I'm not trying to be perfect, and learning what this new cooker can do is precisely what I'm in the thick of.

 

The reason I may not be as interested to follow in the footsteps of 'most Kamado owners' and master the cooker with stock accessories before branching out is that I've got a Fatboy that does a fantastic job smoking ribs, so my only interest in smoking ribs on the Kamado will be if it can come pretty close to matching the quality of what I get with the Fatboy (while also hopefully being a bit easier / less involved).

 

And using the forum as a sounding board for ideas is precisely why I am here - to get insights and suggestions from much more  experienced Kamado owners such as yourself (and so I don't waste time trying anything doomed to fail for known reasons:).

 

So now that I've tried vertical cooking and determined it won't give me the quality and uniformity I seek without rotating (which is too much work in a vertical configuration), and now that this first cook has given me some idea of the smoke and moisture gradients within the cooker, I'm going switch to multi-layer flat cooking of ribs with rotation.  2 grills with 2 racks on one rack and the 3rd rack on the second grill will be pretty easy-peazy and with rotation, I suspect the quality will be good.

 

But I'm also interested to try a 3-stack with a single rack centered on each layer.

 

With the accessories I have, I can just close the lid with 3 grills, the lowest 20" grill positioned directly on the drip pan, an 18" grill positioned 3" higher in the middle of the A/R,  and the highest 20" grill on top of the AR:

 

F37966BE-E7D5-4258-A5DD-D18BA28B72D8.thumb.jpeg.d0d25fef228bcd0bf39046835027e12d.jpegDDEC5B71-6B33-4C5E-ADC0-32164EA8199F.thumb.jpeg.02f4eaa651d4f8873b8cb18e0e44ee7f.jpeg

 

This leaves me with 4” of clearance below the dome and 3” between grills, so I should be able to stack 3 racks of ribs up in the center easily.

 

The lowest rack will get the most moisture and pretty much no smoke, the top rack will get the most smoke and the minimum amount of moisture, and the middle rack should be somewhere in between.

 

So I’ll need to rotate which should be easy except perhaps for the lowermost rack, which has to be lifted 3/4” to clear the A/R.

 

A side benefit of this configuration is if I ever need to smoke 6 racks again (unlikely, but you never know), 3 layers of 2 should work pretty easily.

 

As I play around with more configurations, I’m coming to the conclusion that the partial ring 1/2” above the full ring at the bottom of the A/R is a problem.

 

if I place the A/R on a 20” grill and position the 18” grill in the middle position, as recommended for 3-layer rib smoking, the lower full ring represents a 1/4” barrier that has to be lifted over (no big deal) and the 1/4” partial ring positioned 1/2” above it represents a barrier totaling 1” above grill height.

 

I used a 2” thick ceramic post in this picture to illustrate the issue:

 

94A724E5-8DCB-4867-805A-F8D46144CA19.thumb.jpeg.fb5896b6e9624457ca08f3dfe3750906.jpeg

 

There is just barely 1” of clearance between the top of those 2” of ‘ribs’ and the bottom of the 18” grid above.

 

Reaching tongs in to grab that lowest rack will be problematic, and lifting it 1” to clear the partial ring is likely to result in contact with the front lower edge  of the 18” rack and some scraped-off rib rub.

 

That lower partial ring is only there to (partially) support a sliding oval rack in the lowest position and I don’t think that is a priority for me.

 

So I’m considering cutting out the central 10-12” of that lower partial ring.  That would mean only having to clear the 1/4” tall lower ring - easy to do with 1” of headspace (and also no issue grabbing ahold of that lowest rack of ribs with tongs).

 

Can anyone think of a reason cutting the central portion out of that partial ring in the A/R is a bad idea?  Anyone rotated ribs from that lowest position (with an 18” grill in the middle position) without issue?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, fafrd said:

 

As I play around with more configurations, I’m coming to the conclusion that the partial ring 1/2” above the full ring at the bottom of the A/R is a problem.

 

if I place the A/R on a 20” grill and position the 18” grill in the middle position, as recommended for 3-layer rib smoking, the lower full ring represents a 1/4” barrier that has to be lifted over (no big deal) and the 1/4” partial ring positioned 1/2” above it represents a barrier totaling 1” above grill height.

 

I used a 2” thick ceramic post in this picture to illustrate the issue:

 

94A724E5-8DCB-4867-805A-F8D46144CA19.thumb.jpeg.fb5896b6e9624457ca08f3dfe3750906.jpeg

 

There is just barely 1” of clearance between the top of those 2” of ‘ribs’ and the bottom of the 18” grid above.

 

Reaching tongs in to grab that lowest rack will be problematic, and lifting it 1” to clear the partial ring is likely to result in contact with the front lower edge  of the 18” rack and some scraped-off rib rub.

 

That lower partial ring is only there to (partially) support a sliding oval rack in the lowest position and I don’t think that is a priority for me.

 

So I’m considering cutting out the central 10-12” of that lower partial ring.  That would mean only having to clear the 1/4” tall lower ring - easy to do with 1” of headspace (and also no issue grabbing ahold of that lowest rack of ribs with tongs).

 

Can anyone think of a reason cutting the central portion out of that partial ring in the A/R is a bad idea?  Anyone rotated ribs from that lowest position (with an 18” grill in the middle position) without issue?

 

Just got off of the phone with Tom at CGS and discussed this issue with him.

 

First thing I learned is that the partial lower ring in the Large A/R is not to support any features but merely for mechanical support.  He did not say that lower partial ring was added because they discovered a problem, merely that it was added out of prudence.

 

In fact, Tom mentioned that the XL A/R does not have that partial ring, but because it is manufactured of thicker stainless (3/8" rather than 1/4") tey had no concerns about mechanical strength without it.  He said the Large A/R will probably be fine with that partial ring removed but that the rig would be less structurally sound (looking at the design, I'm not too concerned about this).

 

He agreed that that lower partial ring will interfere with removing racks of ribs on a grate below the A/R but stated that his preferred set-up for smoking 3 racks of ribs is to trim them down so they fit side-by-side on the 20" grate on top of the A/R.

 

So aside from the 3-racks in vertical holders which I tested and rejected, I'm looking at 3 different configurations to smoke 3 racks and will probably test them all (eventually):

 

3 Flat: 3 racks trimmed to fit side-by-side on the 20" grate (I'm giessing I'll have to trim to 15-16" to fit 3 racks side-by-side without hitting the walls of the Kamado).

 

2+1 Flat Stacked: 2 racks on one level and the 3rd rack on a second level.  There are obviously many varients here including 2 on the lower level as well as 2 on the upper level, in addition to all of the different options of what height to position both levels.

 

3 Stacked: racks centered on 3 levels with lower partial ring cut out of the A/R.

 

Both of these second configurations will handle rib racks up to 18-19" in length (full length untrimmed).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a word on stacking ribs.  The stuff that oozes out of the bone ends during the cook is pretty nasty.  It is not like regular fat drippings coming down from the upper racks.  Unless accounted for, it tends to drip on, discolor and add an odd flavor to the ribs below.

 

YMMV of course.


Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, T_om said:

Just a word on stacking ribs.  The stuff that oozes out of the bone ends during the cook is pretty nasty.  It is not like regular fat drippings coming down from the upper racks.  Unless accounted for, it tends to drip on, discolor and add an odd flavor to the ribs below.

 

YMMV of course.


Tom

 

Absolutely aware of this (and it's the reason I tried vertical cooking in my first attempt rather than 2 on one layer and a third on a second layer.

 

Certainly want to avoid bone ends being over rib centers for exactly that reason.

 

I've done 2 levels of aligned ribs before and my sense is, if the bone ends are lined up above other bone ends, it's much less of an issue.  That's why if I try 2+1 I will treat it like a 2+2 with a 'ghost' (missing) rack.

 

And I suppose the other 'solution' would be to put a long narrow aluminum foil 'drip tray' in the middle position:

 

-2 racks side-by-side in the top position getting maximum smoke and minimum vapor/moisture

 

-DIY drip trey / rib protector in the middle position under the seam between the racks above to catch that nasty goop coming out of the bone ends

 

-3rd rack on the bottom position shielded from goop by the DIY drip trey getting maximum vapor and minimum smoke.

 

Or you could put 2 racks in the bottom position if you have a full drip trey under the 3rd rack on top...

 

Kamados seem well-suited to smoking 2 racks of ribs without compromise, but unfortunately smoking 3 racks involves making a trade-off somewhere...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, fafrd said:

 

Absolutely aware of this (and it's the reason I tried vertical cooking in my first attempt rather than 2 on one layer and a third on a second layer.

 

Certainly want to avoid bone ends being over rib centers for exactly that reason.

 

I've done 2 levels of aligned ribs before and my sense is, if the bone ends are lined up above other bone ends, it's much less of an issue.  That's why if I try 2+1 I will treat it like a 2+2 with a 'ghost' (missing) rack.

 

And I suppose the other 'solution' would be to put a long narrow aluminum foil 'drip tray' in the middle position:

 

-2 racks side-by-side in the top position getting maximum smoke and minimum vapor/moisture

 

-DIY drip trey / rib protector in the middle position under the seam between the racks above to catch that nasty goop coming out of the bone ends

 

-3rd rack on the bottom position shielded from goop by the DIY drip trey getting maximum vapor and minimum smoke.

 

Or you could put 2 racks in the bottom position if you have a full drip trey under the 3rd rack on top...

 

Kamados seem well-suited to smoking 2 racks of ribs without compromise, but unfortunately smoking 3 racks involves making a trade-off somewhere...

 

Wow, this has been such a valuable exchange.  It caused me to ‘think outside the box’ and I believe I’ve come up with the winning configuration.

 

Going to a full dual drip-pan + grilling rack set up still requires three levels on the A/R but fit the rig much better:

 

0A6B7C03-3687-4E1E-9C57-A847D1D9B18F.thumb.jpeg.8919c80965b3ea082e9889b2f00cb2fe.jpeg

 

 

 

It turns out that the PB24/LG24 will hold a standard baking sheet (which I use as a drip pan in my Fatboy).

 

This means the lowest A/R position can be used to hold the 18” grate above a first drip pan on the heat deflector, and the highest A/R position can be used to hold a second drip pan under the 20” top rack. 

 

East-peazy to remove racks from the lower position for rotation, no need to cut/modify the A/R, and you have the freedom to cook 3 racks in 2+1 or 1+2 configuration depending on whether you want more or less smoke (top 20” grid should get much more smoke than lower 18” grid).

 

This will be the setup I use next time I smoke 3 racks of ribs (and again, thanks to this exchange - the idea of using 2 drip pans had never occurred to me before you reinforced my concern about bone goop and got me thinking about alternative ways to avoid it in multi-layer cooking).

 

p.s. just for completeness, this set-up uses the CGS Spider to hold a 14” heat deflector and a 15” heat deflector in oblong orientation (so smoke only exits from the sides) followed by the place-setter in legs-up position (providing an air gap from the heat deflectors) which supports the lower drip pan and the A/R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...