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SeaBrisket

Suggestions to up my slicing game

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Looking for recommendations, let's say under $100, for better slicing of things like bacon or brisket. I have no room in my life for a meat slicer.

 

I've considered going the electric knife route and am looking at the Cuisinart CEK-40.

 

https://www.cuisinart.com/shopping/appliances/electric_knives/cek-40

 

I don't particularly want a gadget on my countertop but do people have a positive experience with these and do you make broad use of them?

 

Another option that came up searching this site is the Dalstrong Gladiator slicer. I think this is the correct model:

 

https://dalstrong.com/products/gs-12-in-slicer

 

Any other recommendations or strong opinions on the ones I'm considering? Your help is appreciated.

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10 minutes ago, KJTerp said:

I would get the dahlstrong

you can slice meat, bread, level a cake, even fend off a home invader with that thing

 

that being said, its BIG

 

Like, so big my small wife would hate it?

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9 minutes ago, SeaBrisket said:

 

Like, so big my small wife would hate it?

 

what size knife does she usually use? If she'll rock a 10" chefs knife then I think she would be fine with it, on the other hand if she uses a pairing knife for everything or will only use a 6" chefs knife, probably not

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4 minutes ago, Kamado Tom said:

 

what size knife does she usually use? If she'll rock a 10" chefs knife then I think she would be fine with it, on the other hand if she uses a pairing knife for everything or will only use a 6" chefs knife, probably not

 

Our main knives are 10" and 8" chefs knives. We both prefer the shorter but use both of them plenty.

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1 minute ago, Kamado Tom said:

then I think she'll be ok with the length, odds are she'll like the Fibrox for the handle and weight but the Dalstrong is purdier!!

 

 

I'm leaning toward the purdier :) My boning knife is the Victorinox and I like it quite a bit. I don't see either of us getting a ton of use out of a 12" slicer but it would be nice to have on hand and I need to do something about my current situation. 

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1 hour ago, Kamado Tom said:

 

I agree. Victorinox is high value. I don't own this one, but I do have the chef's knife, and have given some as gifts. Cook's Illustrated loves their knives. I have often thought about this one.

 So of slicing is what you are looking for, good choice.

 If you really want something utilitarian, a chef's knife is the way to go. Most celebrity chefs would recommend a chefs knife for a first knife, usually  high priced brand that they rep.

 I have many sets of knives I have bought over the years, and several I picked up for specific purposes. I usually buy them on some kind of closeout, as I already have all the basics. Latest set was something called a kamikoto, , I found them on an incredible deal. It was a chance to try something different for not much money. I even got a honing board/ strap and honing compound for Christmas. 

OK , I'm a sucker for knives.

 

 

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Most of the recommendations above are mediocre steel at best.  Victorinox is soft, cannot hold beyond a 1k edge and does not hold an edge very long.  If you want something that is reasonably easy to sharpen and takes an amazing edge it is tough to beat Hitachi steel.  Their Blue #2 is more forgiving than White #1 or #2. 

 

The Sujihiki is a symetrical bevel vs the Yanagiba which is asymetrical single bevel which will be harder for the novice to sharpen.  https://www.chefknivestogo.com/kobl2su27.html . It is clad in stainless so easier to care for.

 

This is an amazing White #2 Yanagiba- https://www.chefknivestogo.com/toshya27.html . These knives require good stones.  1000/6000 grits would be more than adequate for either of these.

 

With any high quality steel you also need a wooden end grain cutting board.  No plastic or bamboo which are tough on the edge.  And never ever use a good knife on a ceramic plate or marble counter top.

 

You want a long slicer so you can complete the cut in one stroke.  240mm min, 300mm better.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Family_cook said:

Most of the recommendations above are mediocre steel at best.  Victorinox is soft, cannot hold beyond a 1k edge and does not hold an edge very long.  If you want something that is reasonably easy to sharpen and takes an amazing edge it is tough to beat Hitachi steel.  Their Blue #2 is more forgiving than White #1 or #2. 

 

The Sujihiki is a symetrical bevel vs the Yanagiba which is asymetrical single bevel which will be harder for the novice to sharpen.  https://www.chefknivestogo.com/kobl2su27.html . It is clad in stainless so easier to care for.

 

This is an amazing White #2 Yanagiba- https://www.chefknivestogo.com/toshya27.html . These knives require good stones.  1000/6000 grits would be more than adequate for either of these.

 

With any high quality steel you also need a wooden end grain cutting board.  No plastic or bamboo which are tough on the edge.  And never ever use a good knife on a ceramic plate or marble counter top.

 

You want a long slicer so you can complete the cut in one stroke.  240mm min, 300mm better.

 

 

 

I have a smaller chef knife that is the same maker as the second one and made of the same steel.  I love it.

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I usually find discussions on knives rather humorous.

 

Many of our parents & grand-parents got along very well with knives of steel that many consider junk-steel today.  They butchered the hogs & chickens, etc., etc. & got along better than most of us!  But..............they learned to sharpen their instruments of use ( or got uncle Joe to do work on them when he came over).

 

I would recommend knives in relation to your sharpening skills, type of sharpening, or, perhaps you are planning on hiring out the sharpening.  Japanese knives are normally for those that are into knives as a hobby & are seriously into stone / hand knife sharpening.  I don't think anybody would recommend buying high quality knives & then sharpening them on an electric counter-top sharpener. 

 

Buy what you can afford & what you are willing to keep sharp.  Even inexpensive carbon steel knives can serve one well.  So called "mediocre" steel is a good choice for most people -- Dalstrong or Victorinox , or the 2 German knife manufacturers will serve the majority of people quite well.  You want to get into knives as a hobby, or hang them up on display (little everyday use), or have money to burn - go high-end knives.

 

[Also, find knife sharpening discussions rather humorous.  Do what works for you, & be pragmatic.  Everyone is not going to take the time to learn those time consuming methods, or if learned, use them.  And..............some of us old folks had parents that taught us how to hand sharpen when we were in grade school -- not common today.]

 

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